what do you think of this?

  1. In my state we get a quarterly newsletter from the board of nursing and in it it has a list of all the nurses who received diciplinary action against their license for that quarter. It includes their names, their license no. , the violation and action taken against their license. I find it informational and a learning tool so i dont make the same mistakes but at the same time i dont think i would ever want my name posted like that . How do you feel? Couldnt they just put the license no. instead of the name?
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  2. 10 Comments

  3. by   Altra
    My state does the same. The BON is a governmental agency and as such its actions are matters of public record.

    My husband is another licensed professional and receives a similar semiannual newsletter, also with a section on license infractions and disciplinary actions taken against licensed individuals.
  4. by   nightingale
    New Mexico used to do this (posting the information). I did find it interesting.

    I would think it is there, only as public record, not to intimidate. It is enough, IMHO, to know that any mark against your license puts you at employment risk and would end your career (as you know of it today).

    Many of the positions, certifications, and memberships I am involved in are R/T an unblemished and active license.
  5. by   P_RN
    My BON does this. I see no problem. They also post any dismissals of charges.
  6. by   skipaway
    I also think it's ok to do but I'd not want my license number published. People who are unethical may be able to use this number in many ways...I'm thinking identity theft here.
  7. by   catlady
    I think it's great. Employers need to be able to see who's been disciplined. They may have done an initial check on their employees and everything's fine, and not be notified when something pops up later. I've seen names of people I know listed on these newsletters, and I'd want to know if somebody I work with has a history of disciplinary issues. You have to be able to trust your coworkers. Perhaps it would be an incentive to some not to do things that will get their name published.
  8. by   puggymae
    I think it is great. The first day of school I always pass some old ones around the class for them to look at. I tell them "this is what happens when you do dumb stuff like stealing narcotics. If you don't want me and 10,000 other people to see your name in here do not be unethical."
  9. by   purplemania
    Texas does this also. As for your license number, it too is part of the public record, just like the electrician's or plumber's license.
  10. by   TazziRN
    CA used to publish it in a newsletter, now it's available online. I never thought about it one way or the other until I knew my own name was going to show up. For months I had my husband look at it first, if he saw my name he was to black it out so I couldn't see how the complaint was worded. The issue that would have had my name was never printed; that's when they started putting the info on the website. It doesn't have a list anymore, you have to type in individual names.

    In spite of the humiliation, I see nothing wrong with it. It is public information and if we've done something to warrant discipline, then the public has the right to know that.
  11. by   MelRN13
    In Michigan, your license # is public information and lists if you've had any disiplinary action. All you need to do is type in someone's name and it lists everyone with that name, what license they have (MD, DO, RN, social worker, etc.), when it was issued, when it expires, and any formal complaints or disiplinary action.

    The michigan.gov website also lists disiplinary action on its website monthly.
  12. by   cleo
    The New Hampshire SBON used to publish the names of nurses license's being revoked,or nurses being reprimaned in the quarterly news letter. Now just the license number is published along with the disaplinary action. However we can still log into the website and put in the license number and know the name of the nurse. Again I agree it is public information and see nothing wrong with knowing; we the public have a right to know.
    cleo

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