What do you think a CEO or AHA think about pending legislation? - page 6

Is this a possible CEO or AHA perspective on pending legislation? The nurse recruitment legislation and the legislation to abolish mandatory OT are dream come through for the American Hospital... Read More

  1. by   wildtime88
    Nurses on strike in Oregon, one of their reasons is for better staffing.

    "OHSU nurses strike to improve staffing...."

    So if this legislation is so great why are they striking for better staffing. Don't they know that they are already gong to get it? Don't they know that the hospital they are striking against is going to penalized for non-compliance?

    http://www.oregonrn.org/index.php
  2. by   -jt
    <Nurse Staffing Legislations have been introduced in several states:>


    Legislation enacted PRIOR to 2001 (6 states: CA, KY, NH, NM, RI, VA)

    Legislation introduced in 2001 (12 states: AL, CT, FL, IL, ME, NJ, NM, NY, OH, PA, SC, WV)

    Legislation enacted in 2001 (1 state: OR)

    Legislation introduced in 2001 can be generally classified into 2 categories - those requiring adherence to a valid staffing plan to ensure safe patient care - and those bills setting specific nurse-to-patient ratios.

    Valid Staffing Plan legislation is in process in IL, ME, NY, OH, and PA.

    Specific nurse-to-patient ratio-setting legislation in CT, NJ, and OR calls for nurse to patient ratios in all health care facilities.

    Legislation introduced in AL, FL, NM, NY, OH, SC and WV also calls for specific school nurse to pupil ratios

    Background:
    Noting the decline in nurses on staff at many health care institutions and the substitution of cheaper, unlicensed personnel, ANA established the "Principles for Nurse Staffing." These Principles provide recommendations on appropriate staffing to reverse this trend and for reclaiming a safe environment for nurses and patients.

    1998 saw the first legislation passed by KY and VA to set appropriate staffing methodology.

    In 1999, CA passed legislation to require nurse-to-patient ratios in acute care hospitals. New Hamphire approved data collection on the rates of RNs per bed. New Mexico agreed to study the education and training mix necessary for personnel to meet state health care demands and RI adopted a House study on patient care and nurse staffing in acute care hospitals.

    Legislation enacted in 2001 in Oregon requires hospitals to develop and implement nurse staffing plans and establish internal review processes. Penalties will result for noncompliance.
    http://www.nursingworld.org


    <<Oregon Nurses Association's bill HB2800 on NURSE STAFFING Passes

    The Safe Nursing Care Act HB 2800 Becomes LAW
    First in the Nation!

    Elements of the new law include:

    Staffing Standards
    Staffing Plan Variances for Rural Facilities
    Mandatory Overtime Restrictions
    Patient Abandonment
    Whistleblower Protections
    Whistleblower Remedies - for nurses who have suffered retaliation by employers
    Posting of Whistleblower law in every facility
    Enforcement - penalties to the facility for violations of any element of this law >>
    http://www.oregonrn.org/hb2800law.php


    All achieved by the hard-fought efforts of nurses getting political & doing more than just sitting back & complaining.
    Last edit by -jt on Jan 2, '02
  3. by   wildtime88
    Nurses on strike in Oregon, one of their reasons is for better staffing.

    "OHSU nurses strike to improve staffing...."

    So if this legislation is so great why are they striking for better staffing. Don't they know that they are already gong to get it? Don't they know that the hospital they are striking against is going to penalized for non-compliance?

    http://www.oregonrn.org/index.php

    So why are these nurses in Oregon striking for better staffing then?
  4. by   Peeps Mcarthur
    They're striking because it's not over by any means.
    There are no specific numbers for staffing. In an apparent compromise, the hospital will have to justify the crappy working conditions. That won't happen until it's enforced by legal action somewhere down the road. They are'nt just going to change what they've been making millions on overnight. It's a step on the moon, not an exploration. It's a good step because it's at least in the right direction, but they won't give in without a fight.



    Mandatory Overtime Restrictions
    " This also reflects the compromises that were necessary to gather the political support necessary to pass the bill. An allowance for two hours of mandatory overtime is included in the bill while the hospital seeks to find a replacement nurse. However, there is a firm limit prohibiting mandatory overtime exceeding 16 hours in a 24-hour period"
    What kind of mandatory overtime statement is that? Why even bother to put that in? Couldn't they just work you doubles while they "try" to find replacements?
    I know it's not easy but to come all this way and not take away their magic wand of automatic staffing is a waste of the chance for change.
    I am refreshed by the fact that there does seem to be some progress and I'm very pleased that Oregon nurses are willing to try to make that happen. I hope that I'm wrong and this somehow makes their work enviroment bearable. They deserve it for their effort.

    They need to keep the unions in this country for bargaining power. The unions don't have to be radical. They could simply follow the same ground rules as hospitals and observe and enforce those laws that protect nurses by the threat of a strike and a negotiation of a new contract with more threatening language than the laws. No threat of government fines and penalties is going to impress the hospitals. Historically the government has offered big business a compromise in lieu of a financial penalty, so I think the unions are the only way to enforce it realisticly.

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What do you think a CEO or AHA think about pending legislation?