What is a the difference between RN I, II, III etc?

  1. 0
    I am currently a new grad RN. I think it is considered a RN I at where i work at? But I was wondering if anyone really knew what the numbers meant. What is a the difference between RN I, II, III etc? What do I have to do to get RN II. I hear you need 2 years experience as a nurse to get that and then you get the base rate pay for the job. Any clarification would help. Someone also told me to get RN III you have to do a project?

    again thanks in advance
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  4. 0
    Sounds like a clinical ladder that is specific to your facility. Have you asked HR?
  5. 0
    Those are local designations for your institution's clinical ladder. Ask for a copy.
  6. 4
    This might differ somewhat according to clinical ladders but IMO, basically, this kind of covers the designations:

    The RN 1 provides registered nursing care which involves nursing assessment and diagnosis, planning, implementation/intervention, and evaluation.
    An applicant will be reclassified to the next higher class in the series after successful completion of a mandatory one year training period.
    Education and Experience: Currently licensed as a Registered Nurse.


    The RN 2 provides registered nursing care which involves nursing assessment and diagnosis, nursing care planning, nursing care implementation/intervention, and nursing care evaluation. This class differs from that of Registered Nurse 1 in that an incumbent of the latter functions at the entry level.
    Education and Experience: Currently licensed as a Registered Nurse and experience equivalent to one year of registered nursing.


    The RN 3 provides registered nursing care which involves nursing assessment and diagnosis, planning, implementation/intervention, and evaluation. The RN 3 is a member of the management team and has clinical responsibility, including scheduling, motivation, discipline, employee evaluation, handling grievances, interviewing, and staff development.
    Education and Experience: Currently licensed as a Registered Nurse and experience equivalent to three years of registered nursing.



    The RN 4 is the managerial class in the Registered Nurse sub series and is responsible for managing nursing staff activities on all shifts, has twenty-four hour administrative responsibility or serves as an assistant director of nursing.
    Education and Experience: Currently licensed as a Registered Nurse and experience equivalent to four years of registered nursing.
    OR:
    Currently licensed as a Registered Nurse, education equivalent to a diploma in registered nursing from an accredited school of nursing or bachelor's degree in nursing from an accredited college or university, and experience equivalent to three years of registered nursing.


    The RN 5 is the highest class in the Registered Nurse series and provides nursing consulting and program management which involves developing, implementing, and evaluating registered nursing policies and procedures, determining staffing needs, budget development and monitoring, procurement and contract negotiation, and administrative reports.
    Education and Experience: Currently licensed as a Registered Nurse, education equivalent to a diploma in registered nursing from an accredited school of nursing or bachelor's degree in nursing from an accredited college or university, and experience equivalent to four years of registered nursing, of which one year must be nursing supervisory or consultation experience.
    OR:
    Currently licensed as a Registered Nurse, education equivalent to a graduate degree in nursing from an accredited college or university, and experience equivalent to three years of registered nursing, of which one year must be nursing supervisory or consultation experience.

    Hope the info. above helps you.
    reagansm, mzjennx, escapebigd, and 1 other like this.
  7. 1
    [quote=mizfradd;3975875]This might differ somewhat according to clinical ladders but IMO, basically, this kind of covers the designations:

    The RN 1 provides registered nursing care which involves nursing assessment and diagnosis, planning, implementation/intervention, and evaluation.
    An applicant will be reclassified to the next higher class in the series after successful completion of a mandatory one year training period.
    Education and Experience: Currently licensed as a Registered Nurse.


    The RN 2 provides registered nursing care which involves nursing assessment and diagnosis, nursing care planning, nursing care implementation/intervention, and nursing care evaluation. This class differs from that of Registered Nurse 1 in that an incumbent of the latter functions at the entry level.
    Education and Experience: Currently licensed as a Registered Nurse and experience equivalent to one year of registered nursing.


    The RN 3 provides registered nursing care which involves nursing assessment and diagnosis, planning, implementation/intervention, and evaluation. The RN 3 is a member of the management team and has clinical responsibility, including scheduling, motivation, discipline, employee evaluation, handling grievances, interviewing, and staff development.
    Education and Experience: Currently licensed as a Registered Nurse and experience equivalent to three years of registered nursing.


    Thanks for taking the time to explain how some hospitals classify the staff. At my previous job my badge read "Senior Nurse RN 3" and in my opinion this created friction with my co-workers from day one. The nurse that had been there the longest was a " RN 2" . All the other nurses had badges that said "Staff Nurse". They immediately asked how long I had been a nurse and what I was being paid. Although I had been a nurse for many more years than any of them I had no experience in my new department and they knew I was making significantly more than anyone there. After four months of being treated like dirt I resigned . Happy ending .....love my new job and everyone I work with . My badge says RN and so does my supervisors : )
    mzjennx likes this.
  8. 1
    You're welcome. It's a shame that your former co-workers were so nosy about your classification as well as your salary...that is just so rude!
    I'm glad to hear you are very happy at your new job!
    WarmBlanket likes this.
  9. 0
    [QUOTE=WarmBlanket;3976027]
    Quote from mizfradd
    They immediately asked how long I had been a nurse and what I was being paid. Although I had been a nurse for many more years than any of them I had no experience in my new department and they knew I was making significantly more than anyone there.
    In some facilities you can get fired for talking about how much you are paid.


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