What didnt you do in school?

  1. 0
    I'm getting close to graduation, and theres SO many things I've never done on a live patient! Stuff like, foley, IV's, injections, (all I really have done is some minor wound care and hygiene stuff) It makes me nervous, but hopefully I'll be blessed with a great orientation....SO.... What types of things had you never done on a live person til after you were licensed and working?

    Have you precepted a new grad and been surprised at the skills they hadn't had much practice with?

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  2. 75 Comments...

  3. 24
    Holy Crap. Get your money back.
  4. 8
    Skills were something I was worried about also. But after working I have learned that many "nursing" skills are taught to lay people. So don't worry to much about that. Your education and what others will rely on is your assessment skills, knowing when something isn't right, knowing this order is not safe or that K level needs action now etc..

    Skills will come in time, when you start working ask your preceptor to give you all the chances to master those skills but don't forget the other stuff.. Nursing is so much more than tasks
    nrsmndy, hiddencatRN, GrnTea, and 5 others like this.
  5. 6
    Injections we started in second semester, I was able to start my first IV in third, I inserted my first foley the last semester of nursing school.. Depending on your clinical sites, these tasks may not come up while you are their so yes, it can be difficult to do. I didn't drop my first NG or OG til I was in the working in the ICU. It was 3 years before I drew my own labs because lab techs were not used at my current facility..

    Never be scared to say, I need help I have never done that before..
    hiddencatRN, GrnTea, loriangel14, and 3 others like this.
  6. 1
    In school I put in 2 or 3 foleys. Never put in an IV. Never suctioned a trach. Never did anything with an NG tube. I worked med surge for 6 months after graduating and in all that time I put in ONE foley, used the IV team for all IV's, did nothing more than monitor NG output, never had a pt with a trach.
    SandraCVRN likes this.
  7. 2
    Sun0408, thanks, that actually makes me feel a lot better. I feel like knowledge wise I'm doing really well, if that makes sense. I have done SQ injections, mostly on myself so no biggie.

    I have done tons of stuff in lab, and I have my final term with my preceptorship coming up soon, so hopefully I'll get to do more of the hands on stuff. Thanks again, and Rizz too!
    jelite37RN and SandraCVRN like this.
  8. 5
    Quote from Sun0408
    Skills were something I was worried about also. But after working I have learned that many "nursing" skills are taught to lay people. So don't worry to much about that. Your education and what others will rely on is your assessment skills, knowing when something isn't right, knowing this order is not safe or that K level needs action now etc..

    Skills will come in time, when you start working ask your preceptor to give you all the chances to master those skills but don't forget the other stuff.. Nursing is so much more than tasks
    Exactly.

    I never did any of that on a live patient but nursing is more about assessment and knowing your stuff rather than starting IVs
    hiddencatRN, Surprised1, GrnTea, and 2 others like this.
  9. 4
    This is just how nursing school is these days, I guess. Mine was the same. I think nurses who went to school in earlier years had a different experience. But everything everyone has said is so right on - you will learn the procedures and that stuff as you go. Find a couple great coworker resources on your unit and never be afraid to ask for backup. Nursing really is learned on the job, not in school!
    SuesquatchRN, nikishere33, aachavez, and 1 other like this.
  10. 6
    During school clinical rotations I never had the chance to...

    1. Insert a Foley catheter
    2. Start a peripheral IV
    3. Insert a NG tube (I've still never done this in my 7 years of bedside nursing)
    4. Irrigate an indwelling urinary catheter
    5. Perform a real head-to-toe assessment
    6. Apply a wound vac
    7. Flush a PICC or central line
    8. Administer blood
    9. Perform intraosseous infusions (Still never done this)
    10. Assess for livor mortis or rigor mortis

    The ones I listed are the top ten, but there's still so much I never learned in nursing school. My nursing programs (LVN and RN) focused on passing NCLEX and not much else.
  11. 3
    Reading this makes me feel better.


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