What contribution do YOU make to nursing?

  1. Is nursing just a money-making job for you? What contribution do you make to nursing? Why did you want to become a nurse and what continues to motivate you to show up to work each day?
    •  
  2. 19 Comments

  3. by   clemmm78
    I entered nursing because I knew that there would always be work, no matter where or when.

    While nursing is not my passion, I think I do a good job. I listen when my patients need to be listened to. I care when I need to care. I try to go the extra mile when it's called for.

    Am I a super nurse? No, there are many who are much better than I, but I feel that I am a good nurse.

    While I can't say that money is my sole motivator, it is a very strong one. Nurses in Quebec get nowhere near the salaries you do in many states, but it is a living and it pays the bills when my writing isn't full time.
  4. by   911fltrn
    The reason people go to work is for money!

    I like to help people and I am constantly helping my friends and family.

    I have saved and have helped save many lives. This is a wonderful thing.

    I have also helped comfort many dieing individuals and their families. This is also something I am honored to be able to do.


    But I go to work for money, its that simple.
  5. by   MomNRN
    To put my kids through college and myself into comfortable retirement!

    I like my job, but would quit in a heartbeat if I could!
  6. by   RNsRWe
    I wanted to contribute to my family income and still have flexibility in my schedule to allow me time with my children (so that they don't have daycare or a string of babysitters when not in school).

    I really like nursing. I chose this because I felt I would be good at it, I'm a do-gooder sort <grin> and others suggested I'd be good at it, too. So there I went, trudging off to school.

    I really dislike the short staffing and beaurocracy (leading to shorter staffing and heavier workloads).

    If I was wealthy, I would NOT be a nurse, but would certainly volunteer my time in various places of need. But money is the key motivator for my choosing to be an RN versus other do-gooder activities I might have gone for.
  7. by   IamRN2345
    Quote from 911fltrn
    The reason people go to work is for money!

    I like to help people and I am constantly helping my friends and family.

    I have saved and have helped save many lives. This is a wonderful thing.

    I have also helped comfort many dieing individuals and their families. This is also something I am honored to be able to do.


    But I go to work for money, its that simple.
    Do you think money motivates everybody to go to work?
  8. by   sissyboo
    I know some people who don't go to work solely for the money.

    I'm not a nurse yet, but it's always what I wanted to be. It's only been in the past few years that I've really researched nursing and learned how flexible schedules can be, not to mention the pay is awesome.

    I would still WANT to be a nurse regardless of pay and scheduling, whether I could actually achieve that and still provide the way I need to is a different story.
  9. by   clemmm78
    Quote from IamRN2345
    Do you think money motivates everybody to go to work?
    I think that for most of us, yes. After all, we need money to live. I think that people who are independantly wealthy, be it from shrewd investing, savings, hard work or inheritence have the luxury of deciding if they want to work or not, but most of us "little guys" don't.

    Some people do choose to take lower paying jobs - you see that in nursing too. Some people who leave high paying, high powered jobs to be a nurse, but they are still working for money. I've yet to meet a nurse who regards it as volunteer work.
  10. by   IamRN2345
    I think you are misunderstanding me. I'm not asking who views it as volunteer work. I am asking whether or not money is the motivator for choosing a nursing career.
  11. by   clemmm78
    Quote from IamRN2345
    I think you are misunderstanding me. I'm not asking who views it as volunteer work. I am asking whether or not money is the motivator for choosing a nursing career.
    Ah, that wasn't the original question. I was answering this one:
    Is nursing just a money-making job for you?

    No, I didn't go into nursing for money. In Canada, it is hardly as well paying as I've seen in many states. I'm in nursing because there are jobs and there is flexibility, which are both important to me.
  12. by   llg
    OK ... I'll take a shot at this one....

    I chose nursing as a career because I thought it was a good use of my talents -- and I wouldn't feel satisfied with my life if i weren't contributing something positive to society. Having a career that only "made me money" that did not do anything to help or improve society would make me feel as if I had not lived my life well and wisely. It would seem too selfish to me.

    If I were to suddenly become rich tomorrow, I would choose to continue making some sort of contribution to society through nursing. I would want to continue making some sort of contribution for the same personal reasons stated above ... and I would choose to do it through nursing because that is where my expertise lies now that I have all this education and experience. Nursing is/would be the most effective "vehicle" to use to make a worthwhile contribution to society for me.

    However, if I were to suddenly become rich ... I would probably quit my job and/or try to cut back my hours. The daily grind on a full time basis is stressful and I would seek opportunities to continue my nursing career in a different capacity -- a part time one that would give me more time for other aspects of life that are also important. I would seek a better balance.

    So ... I guess ... I work a "job" full time because I need money to support myself. However, I definitely don't do it just for the money.

    Over the years, I have contributed to society through nursing and contributed to the profession of nursing in many ways -- as a bedside nurse, charge nurse, preceptor, mentor, etc. I have done a little research and have had it published, thus contributing to our knowledge base. I have served as chairman of a committee of my clinical specialty's national organization. I have helped to educate students who have gone on to make contributions of their own. I have created and now run both a nursing student extern program and a nursing scholarship program that will continue to contribute to the education and financial support of nursing students long after I am gone. (We have established endowed charitable funds to financially support these programs in the long term.)

    I still have another 10 - 15 years of career years left. I hope to use that time wisely and continue to make positive contributions to society through nursing.
  13. by   llg
    I liked the way you phrased your original question and will probably use it (or something like it) in the future as I give presentations, engage in discussions, etc.

    Thanks for starting this thread.
  14. by   JBudd
    I chose nursing because I like people, and I wanted a job that made an essential difference (my jobs at restaurants and cashiering to get through school didn't really seem significant to the real world at the time and just about anybody could do them). I have a need to be needed. A great many people cannot do what we nurses do. I am happier nursing than in any other job. I have volunteered overseas as a nurse, using my own savings to live on.

    However, I expect to be compensated for my time, experience, knowledge and expertise. I trade my labor for other people's labor (through the exchange medium of money) just like everyone else. My mistakes may cost someone their life, or my expertise may catch a life threatening situation in time; so I expect that my labor is worth more than most jobs where mistakes are troublesome but not killers.

close