What CNAs need to tell the nurse - page 6

in a postop, i want to hear about: pain level (could indicate compartment syndrome or that dose needs adjusting) c/o nausea/vomiting (could indicate an ileus) bp over 140/80 or under... Read More

  1. by   rgroyer1RNBSN
    Quote from kurosawa
    Yeah. So you collect the big bucks for assessment, care planning, and delegation--and you expect the CNA to do it for you.

    Get a grip.

    You know why you don't get abnormal data ASAP in the middle of the CNA taking vitals?

    Because it takes 15 minutes to find you which she can't afford even when she's only vitaling half the floor, let alone the whole floor by herself, and you're not helping by not carrying your pager.

    Because every other RN on the floor is hollering for (1) their vitals and (2) come here NOW and help me/do this/do that.

    Because she's WAY overloaded before anyone starts hollering: if you took total care of your pts, you'd find yourself spending half your night on changing, cleaning, and bathing, yet with 5 RNs for 1 aide, you expect all that done "and where are my vitals and I's and O's?"

    Because she knows what normal is, and not only that but what floor policy is, but so many times she's gone hunting for an RN with data that's out of limits and been told, oh I don't worry until it's X or Y or Z, or, did you really have to wake up the pt for a BP and anyway that's normal for him -or- leave him alone, he's dying.

    But mostly she doesn't do your assessments, plan your care, do critical thinking, and do your delegations because she doesn't have RN training.


    Like marie said that was rude, assumptive, and uncalled for I used to be an CNA and then an LPN then an RN and I didnt mind helping my LPN's and RN's gee weez I would hate for you to be my aide sounds like some ones got a little lazy in her geez some one outta talk to you that way.:angryfire

    Just mention any color changes and smells in stuff such as urine or feces or vomiting.
  2. by   twotrees2
    Quote from Marie_LPN
    None of our orthopods will do that (bilateral TKAs), weight-bearing issues being one reason.
    dont know for sure - had a friend who did this - she swears it was the best way to do it. dont know its how i would do it but she did ok at 65 so guess it cant be all bad.
  3. by   chadash
    With one knee replacement, just keep the knee extended and bear most of the weight on the non operative leg, but what I was wondering was how that is done when both knees are done. They do that sometimes, but I have not seen how they handle first time up.
  4. by   Simplepleasures
    How about telling you when your patient is dead?This is the honest to God truth, I had a CNA once who wrote on the TPR sheet that she gave me that she was unable to do TPR on patient "due to death".How about reporting this little detail right away?:uhoh21:
  5. by   chadash
    Quote from ingelein
    How about telling you when your patient is dead?This is the honest to God truth, I had a CNA once who wrote on the TPR sheet that she gave me that she was unable to do TPR on patient "due to death".How about reporting this little detail right away?:uhoh21:
    At least she had a good solid reason. Ive seen worse!
  6. by   UM Review RN
    Quote from ingelein
    How about telling you when your patient is dead?This is the honest to God truth, I had a CNA once who wrote on the TPR sheet that she gave me that she was unable to do TPR on patient "due to death".How about reporting this little detail right away?:uhoh21:
    Now I just got home from work and I have a mouthful of ice cream and then I read THAT.




    And I can't stop laughing long enough to clean off my monitor.
  7. by   Va rebelnurse
    I worked as a nursing assistant the whole time I was in LPN school. I felt like the experience was invaluable to me after I graduated and began working. Since then I have completed the bridge class to get my RN. I work with a really great bunch of aides. I have often though of coming up with a list of things to give new aides on orientation. The original posters list was a good one. A lot of the problem I see is the aide vs nurse mentality. Our jobs are both the same- to care for patients- we just do different things to complete our jobs. I recently heard a new RN who just passed boards make the comment that she was glad she had passed so that she wouldn't have to clean up s**t anymore. Boy she is in for a rude awakening isn't she?!! That is a sure fire way to tick off the aides working with you!
  8. by   lauries sister
    Hello to all the great nurses that serve humanity, A great big HUG to each and everyone of you, Thank you, for all that you give and do for others!!! I've been a CNA for 20 years, and just beginning my journey to become a nurse. I have learned so much as a nurses aide from the caring nurses that I have worked with,so much more than I could ever know from a book, my life has been so richly blessed, because someone took the time to teach me nursing, or to make me laugh, when I wanted to cry,cos the job stress became too unbearable, a kind word and a loving heart can lift our spirits up beyond measure!! So nurses, If you have an aide that is not performing too well, tell them so, and also tell them what they are doing right, may I suggest the buddy system, partner them with a mentor, a CNA that can be a good example, we are never too old to learn!! I send you abundance of LOVE and heartfelt Thank you to all of you for being NURSES. FLO BORTELL,CNA
  9. by   chadash
    Here is a new twist on this helpful topic: how to tell the nurses. Sometimes we ( the cna's ) are running pretty fast, and the nurses are very busy, but we might need to communicate some little variation or suspicious sign or symptom. Is it appropriate to give notes to the nurse, instead of interupting them to speak?
  10. by   all4schwa
    i used to do this in the nursing home. i can see their med cart in the hall, but they are in a room with a patient and i'm on my way to do something, i just tuck a not in the mar (somewhere they would see it, but not sharing the info with the world). unless it's something important. if so and so wants pain meds, chances are she's on her way there now. in the hospital now (and now i'm a nurse) my techs and i all have phones, so we just call each other.
  11. by   chadash
    I really appreciate that. I think I will start doing this. I don't want to drive my nurses crazy!
  12. by   all4schwa
    well, also...if i knew they were smoking i leave a note on the desk b/c i know they will come back there first. and if they are on the phone with the doc and i've got recent vitals ( or similiar situation ) i'll slip them a note.
  13. by   chadash
    Thanks! This may help!

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