What can I do with my BSN that Assoc. RN's can't? - page 9

I just graduated with my BSN this spring. I'm working as a PCA2/Graduate Nurse at a local hospital until I take my boards... I am taking my HESI tomorrow at the college I graduated from. This is an... Read More

  1. by   bsnecu99
    Quote from RN4NICU
    They are not feigning education that they do not have. By calling themselves professional nurses, the LPNs in question are pretending to be something they are not and to the lay public who does not know the difference, this is misleading - "false advertising" if you will - and implying that you have credentials that you DO NOT HAVE is ILLEGAL!

    By the way, my registration certificate that I received from my BON says
    PROFESSIONAL NURSE right across the center of it, so it not only implies, but flat out states that I have earned this title - these LPNs have not.
    I think you meant to say they ARE feigning education they do not have. Well, if an LPN is not a professional, I guess we can safely extrapolate that they aren't professional. Oh Lawdy, don't let an unprofessional nurse touch me, Oh Lawdy! I was looking on my license and no where does it say PROFESSIONAL. It just says "Licensed as a Registered Nurse in (state).
  2. by   RN4NICU
    Quote from bsnecu99
    I think you meant to say they ARE feigning education they do not have. Well, if an LPN is not a professional, I guess we can safely extrapolate that they aren't professional. Oh Lawdy, don't let an unprofessional nurse touch me, Oh Lawdy! I was looking on my license and no where does it say PROFESSIONAL. It just says "Licensed as a Registered Nurse in (state).
    NO...actually I meant that the CNA's that are called PCT's (or whatever) that you referred to are not feigning education that they do not have.
  3. by   bsnecu99
    Quote from RN4NICU
    NO...actually I meant that the CNA's that are called PCT's (or whatever) that you referred to are not feigning education that they do not have.
    Hon, I guess you are a foreign nurse. ALL nurses on ALL levels require not only an education, but licensure. I had a license as a cosmetologist which meant I passed a written and a practical exam. When I passed, I became professional vs someone doing perms in the kitchen. When the CNA recieves his or her license, it specially states, CNAI or CNAII, NOT care partner, or whatever. That might imply they are on the same level as a nurse, MD or other ancillary staff. Now, is THAT what you meant to say? BTW I would rather be called by my education, MSN or PhD, whatever, than registered nurse. But, unfortunately my name tag only says my name, and RN!
  4. by   Hellllllo Nurse
    Quote from bsnecu99
    I think you meant to say they ARE feigning education they do not have. Well, if an LPN is not a professional, I guess we can safely extrapolate that they aren't professional. Oh Lawdy, don't let an unprofessional nurse touch me, Oh Lawdy! I was looking on my license and no where does it say PROFESSIONAL. It just says "Licensed as a Registered Nurse in (state).
    In all their writings, my BON refers to RNs as "professional" nurses and LPNs as "technical" nurses.

    However, my point was not to try and start a debate on whether or not LPNs are professionals.

    My point was in how the DON is trying to pull one over on the public, and how she is implying by her actions that being "just" a licensed practical nurse is apparently not good enough in her eyes.
    I am incredulous as to why the LPNs working for her do not feel that by changing their titles, the DON is in fact, insulting.


    Here's an example to illustrate my point-

    How would you feel about it if an RN's boss told her "If pts and families incorrectly refer to you as a nurse practitioner, don't correct them. It will make you and us look like a bigger deal in their eyes. In fact, let me give you this badge with a misleading title on it, so that they will assume you are more than just an RN."

    ????

    See my point?
  5. by   bsnecu99
    Quote from Hellllllo Nurse
    In all their writings, my BON refers to RNs as "professional" nurses and LPNs as "technical" nurses.

    However, my point was not to try and start a debate on whether or not LPNs are professionals.

    My point was in how the DON is trying to pull one over on the public, and how she is implying by her actions that being "just" a licensed practical nurse is apparently not good enough in her eyes.
    I am incredulous as to why the LPNs working for her do not feel that by changing their titles, the DON is in fact, insulting.


    Here's an example to illustrate my point-

    How would you feel about it if an RN's boss told her "If pts and families incorrectly refer to you as a nurse practitioner, don't correct them. It will make you and us look like a bigger deal in their eyes. In fact, let me give you this badge with a misleading title on it, so that they will assume you are more than just an RN."

    ????

    See my point?
    What point? The only thing a patient's family wants a nurse to do is wipe the patient's bottom anyway. Or boost them in bed/Get them a pain pill/
    Fill the water jug/Crank up or down the head of bed. All which can be done by staff other than nurses. They don't care! They don't give two toots what you call yourself, actually. Yes, yes, I am not starting an argument about whether a LPN is professional, I am just showing how stupid the entire argument sounds. Our BON licenses anybody. Teens with 10 weeks of night school are called "certified med techs," what point?
  6. by   kids
    just a reminder, the question raised by the title of the thred is: "what can i do with my bsn that assoc. rn's can't?". lets keep all discussion respectful and on topic.

    thank you
  7. by   zenman
    Posted by bsnecu99: Well, I believe there will come a time when EVERY nurse will be required to have a PhD to provide even minimal incontinent care.
    No, we just need the BSN as entry level so that we will be on par with other professions and eliminate the infighting...I mean some of the infighting...among nurses.
  8. by   TexasPoodleMix
    All of this talk about making Bsn standard makes me uneasy. I want to start an ADN program in F05 and of course in time get a BSN after I have worked for a year or two. I already have a BS and an MA and simply don't have the $$ for the tuition or commute for a BSN at this time. There are some great ADN programs around here and I know many people who have graduated from them and gainfully employed , etc. (I am in the houston area, btw) ... soooooo my worry is... in the next 2-3 yrs will bsn be standard ???

    I would like to work in LTC someday.
  9. by   All_Smiles_RN
    Quote from zenman
    No, we just need the BSN as entry level so that we will be on par with other professions and eliminate the infighting...I mean some of the infighting...among nurses.
    Why do we have to be on par with other professions? Nursing is its own profession. I don't see the need to be part of the stereotypical ideal of what a professional "is". All nurses are professionals. Period.
    ...Jennifer...
  10. by   Hellllllo Nurse
    Quote from TexasPoodleMix
    All of this talk about making Bsn standard makes me uneasy. I want to start an ADN program in F05 and of course in time get a BSN after I have worked for a year or two. I already have a BS and an MA and simply don't have the $$ for the tuition or commute for a BSN at this time. There are some great ADN programs around here and I know many people who have graduated from them and gainfully employed , etc. (I am in the houston area, btw) ... soooooo my worry is... in the next 2-3 yrs will bsn be standard ???

    I would like to work in LTC someday.
    Not to worry, this debate has been going on for decades. In fact, North Dakota, for many years, would only allow BSN RNs to be licensed in their state. N.D. recently recinded this law, and ADNs can now be licensed RNS there. New York State, on the other hand, wants to mandate that all new grads in their state must be BSNs to sit for RN boards, but will "grandfather" in current ADNs and ADNs form other states.

    There has been talk of eliminating LPNs altogether for 50 years. Some areas are utilizing LPNs less, other areas are using them more than ever.

    This whole debate is almost as old as Florence Nightingale.
  11. by   TexasPoodleMix
    Thanks, helllo nurse.

    At the moment, I just want to work as a nurse. I have already (what I feel) wasted my time pursuing other fields because of what others in my life wanted me to do or advised me to do, and I always wanted to do nursing. However, I CONSTANTLY heard "You will hate it" "you will not be able to handle it" etc. etc. or "how do you want to bathe old men" etc. etc and I just didn't pursue it. Don't know why , I guess I didn't feel like listening to the static. So now after 7 yrs of schooling and HATING counseling/psychology I am finally pursuing what I have always "felt" was right for me, for a whole plethora of reasons. I will just **croak** if I get my ADN and they say "Oh , you have to have a BSN in the state of TX to be a nurse now, surprise!" uuugh...

    Thanks though, your post eased my mind somewhat !
  12. by   nursemike
    Quote from kids-r-fun
    just a reminder, the question raised by the title of the thred is: "what can i do with my bsn that assoc. rn's can't?". lets keep all discussion respectful and on topic.

    thank you
    very good point--is that how you get to be a moderator?

    a diploma nurse i work with was rather offended, recently, to learn that she can't be the official preceptor for our new gn's, so that's one potential "benefit" of a bsn, even though nobody--including the offended nurse--actually wants to be a preceptor.

    in response to the op, i don't think many of my classmates in adn school are laughing at you--many of us fully intend to continue, though some, like me, will go at our own pace. but it seems clear from many of these posts that adn's won't accept being looked down on. on the other hand, i think the few who dismiss the value of a bsn are mistaken.
    i'm guessing, here, but it seems likely to me that all novice nurses are novices, and all expert nurses are experts. but in that broad area between novice and expert, the additional education could make you a better nurse than you would otherwise be (and might help you become an expert sooner).
  13. by   zenman
    Posted by jenniferhelene: Why do we have to be on par with other professions? Nursing is its own profession. I don't see the need to be part of the stereotypical ideal of what a professional "is". All nurses are professionals. Period.
    I'll tell you why...everyone else laughs at you and we need to be looked upon by the world as professionals. Nursing is a demanding profession where we take care of the complex human body. If most other professions require a four year degree and their work is not as complicated...something is wrong with this picture. "Professional" PTs supervise 2 yr. PT assistants.
    "Professional" OTs supervise 2 yr OT assistants. Our work, which deals with the entire patient, can be done by 2 yr grads. My wife, a school teacher, just suggested that perhaps we should have 2 year grads teaching in the public schools! They could probably perform most of the "skills" that other teachers could.

close