What can I do with my BSN that Assoc. RN's can't? - page 8

I just graduated with my BSN this spring. I'm working as a PCA2/Graduate Nurse at a local hospital until I take my boards... I am taking my HESI tomorrow at the college I graduated from. This is an... Read More

  1. by   RN4NICU
    Quote from zenman
    I was talking with a nurse the other day and she brought up a point. She sees physicians "discussing" with PTs, RTs, social workers, dietitians, etc. how to treat a patient, but they usually just tell nurses what to do. This doesn't apply to "wet behind the ears" residents who have to ask anybody what to do!
    Sad thing is, it's been this way for so long that if the entry level to professional nursing was changed to the BSN tomorrow, I don't think this would change.
  2. by   grnbug2000
    I am a newis BSN grad-IMHO if you are looking to go ino mgmt get your BSN right away If you think that you will be happy as a floor nurse go for your ADN. At my current hospital there is no difference in pay between ADN and BSN prepared nurses, but in the city where I went to school there was a differential for educational level. I decided early on that I wanted management and more admin. oppertunities so the BSN was a necessity for my grad school admissions (which I start in a few weeks!!) Always remember to value your education it is something that can never be taken away from you!(even if you go broke getting that knowledge!!) Good luck with your HESI and NCLEX!!
  3. by   rollingstone
    Who cares who's laughing at who? Use your imagination and you'll find you can do whatever you set your mind to.
  4. by   RN4NICU
    Quote from grnbug2000
    I am a newis BSN grad-IMHO if you are looking to go ino mgmt get your BSN right away If you think that you will be happy as a floor nurse go for your ADN. At my current hospital there is no difference in pay between ADN and BSN prepared nurses, but in the city where I went to school there was a differential for educational level. I decided early on that I wanted management and more admin. oppertunities so the BSN was a necessity for my grad school admissions (which I start in a few weeks!!) Always remember to value your education it is something that can never be taken away from you!(even if you go broke getting that knowledge!!) Good luck with your HESI and NCLEX!!
    And it may come in very handy when your back decides its had enough.
  5. by   bsnecu99
    Quote from zenman
    If two high school grads both go to nursing school, one to an ADN program and one to a BSN program, the BSN grad will have more of a knowledge base. You can't argue that fact.



    Most professions consider the four year degree as entry level. Why should we lower our standards in the complex healthcare field?



    Think of the nursing "license" as a driver's "license." The license has nothing to do with professionalism. It's a piece of paper saying you can work as a nurse.



    These kind of arguments have to stop as they are way off base and not logical. If brought to the ED, I want the nurse with the highest possible knowledge base...period. Perhaps you want the physician treating your major emergency to have half the education...do you...do you?

    Well, I believe there will come a time when EVERY nurse will be required to have a PhD to provide even minimal incontinent care. That is as it should be? It would end the fighting over whether an ADN, RN, BSN or PhD is more prestigious and who has the MOST knowlege, 'cause that is what it is all about! My son was treated by a doctor at DUKE and I started out being utterly impressed until this doc couldn't even put in a few stitches in my kid's chin! When I first started my nursing education, I saw a Canadian nurse doing something that I was thought was incorrect. When I asked her why she was doing it that why she replied, "if you have sound rationale for what your are doing, then it's correct." So, therefore, why not require every nurse to have a PhD? I don't know how Florence Nightengale ever performed her duties without one! Or Clara Barton, or others. The name for this philosophy is called "degree inflation." You can read up on this phenomenon in any good college level sociology text. Now even secretaries are required to have a minimal four year degree. Once everyone has a PhD, then what? Will universities put an entirely new higher degree in place like a FaPS? Which means forever a professional student? If your state board of nursing or your local hospital megachain has a list of nursing practice levels, please read them. Yes, level thee where you are pulling chest tubes and the like does require advance practice. However, if we are ALL advance practice, who will do the bedside nursing? And are hospitals, clinics, doctor's offices, and the like prepared to pay for all PhD level nurses? Thanks for the challenging forum.
  6. by   Darlene K.
    Quote from Hellllllo Nurse

    At one facility, the LPN DON decided she didn't like the title "licensed practical nurse." So, she got badges made for all her LPNs that say "LPN- Licensed Professional Nurse."
    :uhoh21: I wonder how she got away with that?
  7. by   po po
    Bah, it's not worth arguing about. Experience helps but I'm not sure BSN experience counts as much as floor time. A good nurse is a good nurse is a good nurse.

    I suggest everyone lighten up and cruise over to hippocritis.com for some medical related humor and enter their July submisison contest to win $100 bucks like I did. They're making fun of medical students this month too!

    http://www.hippocritis.com/july04/contest.htm

    po po
  8. by   bsnecu99
    Quote from Darlene K.
    :uhoh21: I wonder how she got away with that?
    Probably because the state board of nursing there did not care, they just wanted their money. Shoot, they could have called themselves, lovely princess nurses and the BON wouldn't care!
  9. by   Hellllllo Nurse
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Hellllllo Nurse


    At one facility, the LPN DON decided she didn't like the title "licensed practical nurse." So, she got badges made for all her LPNs that say "LPN- Licensed Professional Nurse."


    I wonder how she got away with that?
    __________________
    Darlene


    Darlene, I am wondering the same thing. My friend tells me that all the LPNs were pleased with their new "titles".
    They did not even realize that besides being illegal, it is an insult.

    What the nurse who came up with the new badges is essenially saying is that being an Licensed Practical Nurse is not good enough. So, she created a new title that is more to her liking. The word "professional" sounds a lot more powerful and prestigous than the word "practical".
    She is misleading the public, and shaming her LPNs.
  10. by   RN4NICU
    Quote from bsnecu99
    Probably because the state board of nursing there did not care, they just wanted their money. Shoot, they could have called themselves, lovely princess nurses and the BON wouldn't care!
    At least that wouldn't be misleading the public by implying they have education that they do not have.
    I would bet the BON did not have any knowledge of this. It is quite illegal. I think I would make an anonymous call to the BON "to see if this practice was legit".
    Last edit by RN4NICU on Jul 11, '04 : Reason: typo
  11. by   bsnecu99
    Quote from RN4NICU
    At least that wouldn't be misleading the public by implying they have education that they do not have.
    I would bet the BON did not have any knowledge of this. It is quite illegal. I think I would make an anonymous call to the BON "to see if this practice was legit".
    Here we go again! Nurses ratting out other nurses! God, stop this madness! I really don't have any opinion about someone calling themselves whatever they want as long as they can walk the walk. Licensed Practical means exactly what? Practically what? Registered nurse does NOT imply anything professional except that you paid your BON seventy bucks and passed the NCLEX. How about this one? Nursing Assistants, that what their license says but here in NC they are called care partners, patient care specialists, nursing support team members, and other nonsensical terms for the same thing. You wanna call on them, too? Sheesh!
  12. by   RN4NICU
    Quote from bsnecu99
    Here we go again! Nurses ratting out other nurses! God, stop this madness! I really don't have any opinion about someone calling themselves whatever they want as long as they can walk the walk. Licensed Practical means exactly what? Practically what? Registered nurse does NOT imply anything professional except that you paid your BON seventy bucks and passed the NCLEX. How about this one? Nursing Assistants, that what their license says but here in NC they are called care partners, patient care specialists, nursing support team members, and other nonsensical terms for the same thing. You wanna call on them, too? Sheesh!
    They are not feigning education that they do not have. By calling themselves professional nurses, the LPNs in question are pretending to be something they are not and to the lay public who does not know the difference, this is misleading - "false advertising" if you will - and implying that you have credentials that you DO NOT HAVE is ILLEGAL!

    By the way, my registration certificate that I received from my BON says
    PROFESSIONAL NURSE right across the center of it, so it not only implies, but flat out states that I have earned this title - these LPNs have not.
    Last edit by RN4NICU on Jul 11, '04
  13. by   Tweety
    Quote from bsnecu99
    Here we go again! Nurses ratting out other nurses! God, stop this madness! I really don't have any opinion about someone calling themselves whatever they want as long as they can walk the walk. Licensed Practical means exactly what? Practically what? Registered nurse does NOT imply anything professional except that you paid your BON seventy bucks and passed the NCLEX. How about this one? Nursing Assistants, that what their license says but here in NC they are called care partners, patient care specialists, nursing support team members, and other nonsensical terms for the same thing. You wanna call on them, too? Sheesh!

    I can definately see RN4NICU's point. You wouldn't want a dental assistant calling themselves a hygenists or a CRNA calling themselves an anesthesiologist.

    But I agree with you here. What matters to me is not whether I've got BSN RNs, ADN RNs, or LPNs on "my" unit. What matters to me most is can you walk the walk.

    I'm all for making the BSN the standard. I could care less what you call me with my ADN. Call me an associate nurse, and the BSN nurses RNs. That wouldn't bother me a bit. (Of course, then give them an NCLEX commiserate (sp?) with their education).

    Just give me nurses that work hard and are safe, observants, etc. etc.

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