What can I do with my BSN that Assoc. RN's can't? - page 11

I just graduated with my BSN this spring. I'm working as a PCA2/Graduate Nurse at a local hospital until I take my boards... I am taking my HESI tomorrow at the college I graduated from. This is an... Read More

  1. by   zenman
    Posted by earle58: i questioned that one already suzy.....out there huh??? i never did receive an answer...no surprise there.
    You are aware that I don't back down from any question. It's just sad that some can't realize the answers. If you restate your particular question and give me your educational level, I'll try to explain it to you. I'm not trying to offend you, but one reason you ask patients their educational level is so you know how to respond to their level when providing patient teaching, for example.
  2. by   zenman
    Posted by suzy253: Maybe I should add some lengthy explanation after my name, like, 2nd year student nurse, diploma educated and proud of it with more clinical hours than BSN's.
    Oh, no...less knowledge base but more OJT! If I were to go back into the Army, I would want a commanding officer who not only was skilled (which comes from experience) but who also had "knowledge" gained from more education...and who knew the history and strategy of every battle ever fought!
    Last edit by zenman on Jul 13, '04
  3. by   zenman
    Posted by earle58: zenman,

    i don't know what you're referring to in terms of the public's confusion, but any ambiguities re: the nursing profession i am sure, evolves from the internal discontent of nursing itself.....the current conditions, the horizontal violence....everyone's running around like a headless chicken. i disagree that the bsn (or lack thereof) has little to do with it.
    The public is confused about what/who a nurse is...but then so are we! Yes, we have many internal problems. If nursing was a company, our stock would really be low...penny stocks perhaps.
  4. by   leslie :-D
    sadly and no i am not laughing, but i think we are losing much of our credibility but even if we all had bsns, do you really think all of this warfare from within would vanish???? no it would not. it would take nurses believing in their power and speaking up to the powers that be, rather than taking it out on each other.
  5. by   Soonstudent
    Quote from LadyBugRN
    Congratulations. You have completed your BSN. Do not worry about what others will be thinking or saying about you about you, those people have nothing better to do but distract you (they are losers!). Get experienced as a floor nurse. Be good at it and do not have a negative attitude. I work with many nurses who hate their jobs but who are still working as a nurse (that's their problem). Be successful. Learn as much as you can. Don't let anybody push you. Have confidence be proficient as you start your career. Do not associate yourself with nurses who hate their job but still hanging on. Associate with nurses with positive attitude. Be a leader and not a follower. Respect people around you and they will respect you. Nurses who will not respect you do not respect themselves. Focus your energy on your patients. They need you. Be a good nurse. With your BSN, and your experience as a floor nurse, you can further yourself by applying to management positions in the future. If you do well, your employment evaluation will be good on your resume.
    Be organized. That comes from experience. It may take time but being organized is important now and and in your future = you will be able to manage your assignments smoothly. Always ask questions when you are not sure. Best wishes and good luck to you. BE PROUD THAT YOU ARE A NURSE!!!
    That's a great attitude ladybug! I don't have a lot of knowledge about nursing because I haven't graduated yet, so I try to keep my opinion to myself. However I really enjoyed reading your post and I totally agree with you. As for ADN/BSN, if I personally just wanted to be an RN, and not in a management position, then I'd just go for an ADN. If not, I'd get a BSN. You could always get your ADN first then go for your BSN. That's the good thing about nursing, it's so versatile. I agree that more knowledge can't hurt, but as I've seen in other fields nothing can replace good hands on experience. No new grad will be able to compete with a seasoned nurse. I also believe it has more to do with the individual than there level of education.
    Brandon
  6. by   suzy253
    Quote from zenman
    I also want the "best" person taking care of me. That person is one who has "skills" and "knowledge."
    That would be a diploma RN.
  7. by   leslie :-D
    Quote from zenman
    You are aware that I don't back down from any question. It's just sad that some can't realize the answers. If you restate your particular question and give me your educational level, I'll try to explain it to you. I'm not trying to offend you, but one reason you ask patients their educational level is so you know how to respond to their level when providing patient teaching, for example.
    you question your patients' educational level before teaching them?????????????????????????

    i asked you for your sources regarding the 15 proclamations of more educated nurses. it sounds falsely reported, or certainly not a source of anything legitimate. please, i eagerly await your response.
  8. by   leslie :-D
    Quote from zenman
    That list was the results of studies.
    again, please provide these references. seeing is believing.
  9. by   Tweety
    Quote from earle58
    you question your patients' educational level before teaching them?????????????????????????
    No, but you certainly assess their cognitive ability, etc. do you not? That's what I think this poster meant. Perhaps he just wanted to know if you were a student or a nurse.
  10. by   leslie :-D
    Quote from 3rdShiftGuy
    No, but you certainly assess their cognitive ability, etc. do you not? That's what I think this poster meant. Perhaps he just wanted to know if you were a student or a nurse.
    cognition is far different from one's education. it's not even comparing apples to apples. and even if i was a student, it would not impair my ability to comprehend zenman's answer to a very simple question, e.g., what were his specific sources for his list of 15? very simple, straightforward question.
  11. by   Tweety
    Quote from earle58
    cognition is far different from one's education. it's not even comparing apples to apples. and even if i was a student, it would not impair my ability to comprehend zenman's answer to a very simple question, e.g., what were his specific sources for his list of 15? very simple, straightforward question.

    Agree. Obviously we are on a nursing related board and the question was unnecessary.

    But assessing a patients education is important. They might not read. But that's off topic. It is apples and oranges, just because we assess patients doesn't mean he needed to assess your education to answer the question.
    Last edit by Tweety on Jul 14, '04
  12. by   angel337
    Quote from luvbug9956
    I graduated with my BSN. I did this because I thought I may want to teach eventually, and I also wanted the go-away-to-college thing, live in the dorms and what-not. You really cannot tell in clinical practice who has the ADN and who has the BSN! Both are adequately educated and skilled. The only thing I have noticed...I graduated from a state that has many nursing schools in a very small area. There are four 4-year colleges and many 2-year schools in a very small area. There are not enough positions for new-grads in this area to accomodate everyone and what they want. Therefore, we found that the BSN-prepared nurses had an easier time finding jobs due to the stiff competition. But I dont know if this is universally true...has anyone in other areas noticed this?
    in chicago, more and more hospitals are advertsing for bsn nurses. however, as a new nurse, if you want to venture away from bedside nursing, no one will take you serious with less than a year of acute care experience, no matter what your education level is. i do know a few bsn new grad nurses that were hired for non-traditional 9-5 nursing jobs just because they have the bsn. so apparently it counts for something. the most important thing about nursing is to continue your education, and that does not neccesarily mean a higher degree. keep up certifications, gain new certifications and attend inservices. be interested and active in your chosen specialty. don't become stagnant, because there is always room for growth. the knowledge you hold does not stop with your degree, how "well rounded" you become is entirely up to you. good luck with your career
  13. by   jnette
    Are we STILL riding this old merry-go-round? :chuckle

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