What can I do with my BSN that Assoc. RN's can't? - page 10

I just graduated with my BSN this spring. I'm working as a PCA2/Graduate Nurse at a local hospital until I take my boards... I am taking my HESI tomorrow at the college I graduated from. This is an... Read More

  1. by   Quickbeam
    I visited a family member in a hspital that did not allow the staff to ID themselves professionally (their badges daid "nursing" no RN, LPN, etc) at all unless you asked directly.

    I think that is terribly wrong. Just my opinion.
  2. by   LadyBugRN
    Quote from doodlebug914
    I just graduated with my BSN this spring. I'm working as a PCA2/Graduate Nurse at a local hospital until I take my boards... I am taking my HESI tomorrow at the college I graduated from. This is an 'exit' type of exam that we have to pass before taking our boards. I'm feeling down about not being able to pass and have this huge fear that I am not going to pass my boards!

    Amidst my fear, I am questioning taking a role as an RN on floor nursing. It seems like most of the RN's on my floor have an associates degree, and I am questioning if I should be doing something different since I have my bachelor's? The pay is the same for an Assoc. or BSN, which doesn't make any sense to me. Just wondering what else is available that I might not be looking for, or what your opinions are!?

    Another BSN student who just graduated as well was speaking with me, and said she wonders if the Assoc. degree RN's laugh thinking that we have wasted our time getting our BSN when we get the same pay/same responsibilities. Is this a big issue?

    Thanks!
    Miranda
    Congratulations. You have completed your BSN. Do not worry about what others will be thinking or saying about you about you, those people have nothing better to do but distract you (they are losers!). Get experienced as a floor nurse. Be good at it and do not have a negative attitude. I work with many nurses who hate their jobs but who are still working as a nurse (that's their problem). Be successful. Learn as much as you can. Don't let anybody push you. Have confidence be proficient as you start your career. Do not associate yourself with nurses who hate their job but still hanging on. Associate with nurses with positive attitude. Be a leader and not a follower. Respect people around you and they will respect you. Nurses who will not respect you do not respect themselves. Focus your energy on your patients. They need you. Be a good nurse. With your BSN, and your experience as a floor nurse, you can further yourself by applying to management positions in the future. If you do well, your employment evaluation will be good on your resume.
    Be organized. That comes from experience. It may take time but being organized is important now and and in your future = you will be able to manage your assignments smoothly. Always ask questions when you are not sure. Best wishes and good luck to you. BE PROUD THAT YOU ARE A NURSE!!!
    Last edit by LadyBugRN on Jul 13, '04
  3. by   RN4NICU
    Quote from Quickbeam
    I visited a family member in a hspital that did not allow the staff to ID themselves professionally (their badges daid "nursing" no RN, LPN, etc) at all unless you asked directly.

    I think that is terribly wrong. Just my opinion.
    I agree - I would not want to be a patient in a hospital that would conceal the credentials of the staff. That sounds scary, in addition to just plain wrong. Makes you wonder how bad the ratios were there.
  4. by   CSLee3
    An RN is an RN. Sorry, that is a fact. States boards and NCLEX doesn't care your educational background for licensure (excluding advance practice RNs) for a reason. If you want a broader ladder to climb, go for the BSN. IF you have no desire to manage stick with ADN, it is all subjective and personal. I personally would rather have a well experience med surg LPN or Diploma RN taking care of my sick butt in a hospital. How many of us have been trained or oriented by LPN, LVN, ADN, Diploma nurses. In my opinion, it is sad to see such demise of diploma programs in the country. Just my thoughts. Entry BSN would be great if all of us had: time, money, university in area, no wait list....on and on. Congrats to all who has done BSN , MSN.
  5. by   luvbug9956
    I graduated with my BSN. I did this because I thought I may want to teach eventually, and I also wanted the go-away-to-college thing, live in the dorms and what-not. You really cannot tell in clinical practice who has the ADN and who has the BSN! Both are adequately educated and skilled. The only thing I have noticed...I graduated from a state that has many nursing schools in a very small area. There are four 4-year colleges and many 2-year schools in a very small area. There are not enough positions for new-grads in this area to accomodate everyone and what they want. Therefore, we found that the BSN-prepared nurses had an easier time finding jobs due to the stiff competition. But I dont know if this is universally true...has anyone in other areas noticed this?
  6. by   suzy253
    I'm one of the lucky ones to be in the few of the diploma programs left. This is a great way to go.
  7. by   jenrninmi
    Quote from zenman
    In my opinion, the development of the ADN degree has been one of the worst things that another nurse could do to our profession. Many other healthcare "professionals" (PTs, OTs, Social workers, dietitians, etc.) have at least a BS or even Masters degree. (In fact, most professional occupations require 4 years of education.) Yet nurses, who must actually know more about the patient, can have less education. Is something wrong with this picture?

    I hear a lot of comments about how diploma and ADN graduates have more clinical (that translates to less "knowledge") than BSN graduates and can "hit the ground running." That's not the issue so drop that argument. No new graduate can function well. I know of no profession where new grads are expected to "hit the ground running." The question is "where are they down the road."

    In most professions more education translates to more money over a lifetime. Whether that does or does not do so for nursing is an internal problem of our profession.

    I'm not talking about any positive personality traits of any one individual, ie., one ADN nurse being far superior to another BSN nurse. I'm talking across the board. Any course a person takes in college increases your "knowledge" level, even if it is a liberal arts course. The person with the most knowledge wins. "Knowledge is power." Critical thinking skills are lacking in many nurses and is greatly improved by more education (knowledge).

    Some other benefits of education include:

    1. better health (for your children also)
    2. reduced crime
    3. wider knowledge gap
    4. more open-minded (oh,no, this seems to be a problem in nursing)
    5. less moralistic
    6. more rational thinking
    7. more cultured
    8. more integrated
    9. more consistent
    10. less authoritarian
    11. less materialistic
    12. less prejudice
    13. greater knowledge of world affairs
    14. greater social status
    15. more social activism

    I'm sure there are more and if I had more education I could think of them!
    Very well said from an educated person. I agree with everything you said!
  8. by   suzy253
    Quote from zenman
    I hear a lot of comments about how diploma and ADN graduates have more clinical (that translates to less "knowledge") Some other benefits of education include:

    1. better health (for your children also)
    2. reduced crime
    3. wider knowledge gap
    4. more open-minded (oh,no, this seems to be a problem in nursing)
    5. less moralistic
    6. more rational thinking
    7. more cultured
    8. more integrated
    9. more consistent
    10. less authoritarian
    11. less materialistic
    12. less prejudice
    13. greater knowledge of world affairs
    14. greater social status
    15. more social activism
    OK I'll bite. how does diploma educated nurses 'translate to less knowledge'
    and your list of 1-15? you're joking....aren't you?
  9. by   leslie :-D
    i questioned that one already suzy.....out there huh??? i never did receive an answer...no surprise there.
  10. by   suzy253
    Quote from earle58
    i questioned that one already suzy.....out there huh??? i never did receive an answer...no surprise there.
    somewhere out here...I think! Been off the boards most of the day and now just relaxing and getting some posts in here.
    Maybe I should add some lengthy explanation after my name, like, 2nd year student nurse, diploma educated and proud of it with more clinical hours than BSN's.
  11. by   zenman
    Posted by CSLee3: An RN is an RN. Sorry, that is a fact.
    Yes, by vertue of licensure. And a glaring example of why nursing is where it's at today.

    I personally would rather have a well experience med surg LPN or Diploma RN taking care of my sick butt in a hospital. How many of us have been trained or oriented by LPN, LVN, ADN, Diploma nurses.
    I also want the "best" person taking care of me. That person is one who has "skills" and "knowledge."
  12. by   zenman
    Posted by suzy253: OK I'll bite. how does diploma educated nurses 'translate to less knowledge' and your list of 1-15? you're joking....aren't you?
    That list was the results of studies. It's almost sad that I have to explain. Yes, diploma nurses can come out of school and "hit the ground running." That is a "trade" mentality and in many trades "clinical" goes on for 10 years before you are turned loose to function on your own. When ADN and diploma nurses brag about having more clinical, I'm going "oh, no, less knowledge base." It would be better for our profession if there was one professional level equal to other professions. Nurses are infighting all the time and the public remains confused about what a nurse is.
  13. by   leslie :-D
    zenman,

    i don't know what you're referring to in terms of the public's confusion, but any ambiguities re: the nursing profession i am sure, evolves from the internal discontent of nursing itself.....the current conditions, the horizontal violence....everyone's running around like a headless chicken. i disagree that the bsn (or lack thereof) has little to do with it.

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