Weird situation in clinical...advice needed! - page 2

My patient from last week is still in the hospital this week. He was assigned to a different student so I was still able to go check up on him and see his progress. He is a retired Catholic priest... Read More

  1. by   hapeewendy
    two words
    SOCIAL WORK
    two more
    RIGHT NOW!

    kudos to you for bringing this up ... now pass it on to someone who can do something about it , its not your problem ! wow like nurses dont have enough to worry about ...... dont get me wrong , I also feel somewhat sorry for this character but really the priest is your patient, this cannot be good for him ...
  2. by   GPatty
    I would have thought the staff would have done something about that by now, but good for you or bringing it up and to their attention!
  3. by   Mkue
    Oh my, I agree with the others
  4. by   nursedawn67
    Time to go freeloading sponge lady...no more living off of the poor ailing priest. He has put his time in serving people and now it is time for his rest and recovery...It is no longer about you! Bye bye...cya later...adios!
  5. by   emily_mom
    I would definitely get social services involved. She is only there for the free food and someone to talk to.
  6. by   sanakruz
    This woman's in need of help.I wont even speculate why she is there, never mind pass judgement on her. This behavior however should not be allowed to continue. I think you are a sharp girl for catching on ....
  7. by   memphispanda
    Ok, update! She got the boot. It took a few days longer than usual for them to catch on to her because there have been some unusual staffing patterns this week (people getting married, someone was sick, etc) so the continuity of care wasn't there. She got the ole heave ho from the priest's room. I don't know if they just sent her away or if they tried to get any help for her. After talking to several people who work there, I found that it isn't a totally uncommon thing to have happen. I feel bad for the woman because she needed help, but at the same time she needs to get help through the proper channels. Thanks for the input from everyone!
  8. by   mario_ragucci
    Either it's good or bad. Yall sound so quick to punches pilot this person. Maybe the person just wants to scavange food, or is at the bottom of maslow's scale and needs base. Some consideration is given to policy of the place He's at. The bible says "blessed is He who sheppards the weak through the valley of darkness." notify the charge nurse and make a log entry of your objective perceptions and judge not, lest ye be judged. Amen (I'm sorry)
  9. by   Dr. Kate
    Mario may you remain as kind as caring as you are today. Sincerely, I really mean that.
    One of the things you learn as you go along in nursing is that you can't fix everyone's problems. You also have to learn to get the appropriate resources in place as soon as possible.
    What you were hearing in this was the need to first care for and protect the patient. Whatever clinical setting you find yourself in, that will always be your primary focus. Next comes the family or significant other. We can't always help them but we can head them toward appropriate resources. Not knowing the woman's relationship, if any, to the patient was the first issue. Once that was determined then decisions had to be made based on that information. But always the patient comes first.
  10. by   ktwlpn
    Originally posted by memphispanda
    Ok, update! She got the boot. It took a few days longer than usual for them to catch on to her because there have been some unusual staffing patterns this week (people getting married, someone was sick, etc) so the continuity of care wasn't there. She got the ole heave ho from the priest's room. I don't know if they just sent her away or if they tried to get any help for her. After talking to several people who work there, I found that it isn't a totally uncommon thing to have happen. I feel bad for the woman because she needed help, but at the same time she needs to get help through the proper channels. Thanks for the input from everyone!
    >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>Oh my LORDY!!! Not totally an uncommon thing? Where in the heck do you live? I can just imagine homeless people wandering the halls of the hospital- casing the joint for non-verbal patients so they can move into their room....This just strikes me as FUNNY! (black humour-I know) I keep picturing that Michael Jackson video Thriller-all of these ghoulish looking people ...crowding the halls....O my...And the icing on the cake--- Mario!!! Quoting scriptures!! It's a freakin' hospital-not a SOUP kitchen...I can not wait until he is out on the floor as a nurse dealing with some scum of the earth families and patients (not that they all are-but the really bad ones sure make an impression) Just when you think you've seen it all....along comes some bag lady camping out next to a comatose patient's bed....Something that I see now on a regular basis just left me speechless when I first encountered it-in my LTC facility we have family memebrs that request re-imbursment for every gift they bring their loved one...including birthday cakes....Every Xmas or birthday gift...I would NEVER have though of it...(we have many that are more then happy to supply any of their loved ones needs) O my O my.....I need a glass of wine..or 2 ....
  11. by   hapeewendy
    its not about being judged or judging , its about the fact that this person was not helping the patient, who is the priority here
    I suggested social work cuz they might have been able to hook her up with some support services or something, in this case memphis as a student had no recourse to help and had to act in the best interest of the patient.
  12. by   rebelwaclause
    Originally posted by Dr. Kate
    One of the things you learn as you go along in nursing is that you can't fix everyone's problems. You also have to learn to get the appropriate resources in place as soon as possible.
    ^5 and AMEN!
  13. by   rncountry
    Curious, did this happen in Baptist Memorial Hospital? I know you may not want to say but I can't help but be curious about it because this is the hospital that my dad was in shortly before he died a couple years ago, and I found the staffing to be pitiful. The staff itself was very good and competant, but one can only do so much when you have too many patients. And the too many patients per nurse is what I saw there. The whole situation of what took place with my dad's care is the reason I became an activist for my profession.
    I do hope that this lady was at least given some referrels for assistance.

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