Weight loss for nurses - page 4

I will be a newly graduated nurse come May and am probably 100 lbs overweight. I was hoping to be working out and eating healthier and have lost some weight by the time I start my career but nursing... Read More

  1. by   mmc51264
    Regarding bariatric surgery, come on people. You want to change your anatomy because you can't lose weight through diet and exercise. This is an extreme solution.
    There seem to be more than just me that have issues with you fat shaming us. Live MY life, walk in MY shoes before you JUDGE me. I worked with endos for 2 years (I take synthroid and controlled DM2), dietitians, orthopedists for my OA related to injury, physical therapy, personal trainer and psychotherapy. I even participated in a research study.

    Nothing worked. Then it was another 2 years working with my weight loss surgery team to get the surgery. I was 2 years post-op last month and am still working with a dietitian, see my surgeon quarterly, under the care of an endocrinologist. I ran a half marathon last year and am now training for a triathlon. Would not be able to do this w/o the surgery. it is not a "fast, easy way out" I did what I needed to do to be healthy now. I am still on synthroid, and metformin but my A1c is 6.1, not that it would impress you. I cannot make the diabetes go into remission. I started this process when I was diagnosed with it in 2010. I do not smoke, drink, do drugs, I exercise and I eat healthy.
    I needed the WLS to reset my metabolism.

    Please do not generalize. You don't know everyone's story. I certainly hope you are not this self-righteous and judgmental of your patients.
  2. by   RegularNurse
    Quote from mmc51264
    There seem to be more than just me that have issues with you fat shaming us. Live MY life, walk in MY shoes before you JUDGE me. I worked with endos for 2 years (I take synthroid and controlled DM2), dietitians, orthopedists for my OA related to injury, physical therapy, personal trainer and psychotherapy. I even participated in a research study.

    Nothing worked. Then it was another 2 years working with my weight loss surgery team to get the surgery. I was 2 years post-op last month and am still working with a dietitian, see my surgeon quarterly, under the care of an endocrinologist. I ran a half marathon last year and am now training for a triathlon. Would not be able to do this w/o the surgery. it is not a "fast, easy way out" I did what I needed to do to be healthy now. I am still on synthroid, and metformin but my A1c is 6.1, not that it would impress you. I cannot make the diabetes go into remission. I started this process when I was diagnosed with it in 2010. I do not smoke, drink, do drugs, I exercise and I eat healthy.
    I needed the WLS to reset my metabolism.

    Please do not generalize. You don't know everyone's story. I certainly hope you are not this self-righteous and judgmental of your patients.
    I'm sorry if I offended you with my post. I am happy that you are doing better after your procedure. I wish you health and happiness in all things :-)
  3. by   newmail445
    "Additionally, for others overweight, do you notice patients question your education or work ethic and if so how do you overcome that?"

    Try this: The Fat Doctor: Can You Trust Out of Shape Health Workers?

    Regarding losing weight: You have to do what you love. Because consistency is key here and it's much easier and effective to be consistent with something you enjoy. It takes lots of trial and error to find what you love, but it's immensely worth it. For me it is Muay Thai.

    Also. be wary of what you eat and drink during a 12 hour hospital shift. Often nurses are shoving sodas, coffee, and snacks down their throats. My dental hygenist says nurses have some of the worst teeth she sees.
  4. by   martymoose
    I haven't lost any weight as a nurse for 10 plus years . You think I would , since I dont have time to eat much, and I am so exhausted after a shift that I go straight to bed.

    I carry all my weight in my gut. I had a pt ask me if I was pregnant. I laughed, and said no, i'm just fat. And I don't really care. My coworker laughed out loud at my reply. Pt obviously must have had bad sight as I am too old to be PG. But I made light of it, so the pt didnt feel bad( she was elderly) she meant well.

    I wonder if I wasnt under so much stress, and had normal hours, if i would lose weight by eating normal. My knees are shot, so not sure about exercise. MDs wont do a uni replacement, so I suffer in pain everyday.

    Good luck OP . maybe you'll do ok.
  5. by   newmail445
    Quote from martymoose
    I haven't lost any weight as a nurse for 10 plus years . You think I would , since I dont have time to eat much, and I am so exhausted after a shift that I go straight to bed.

    I carry all my weight in my gut. I had a pt ask me if I was pregnant. I laughed, and said no, i'm just fat. And I don't really care. My coworker laughed out loud at my reply. Pt obviously must have had bad sight as I am too old to be PG. But I made light of it, so the pt didnt feel bad( she was elderly) she meant well.

    I wonder if I wasnt under so much stress, and had normal hours, if i would lose weight by eating normal. My knees are shot, so not sure about exercise. MDs wont do a uni replacement, so I suffer in pain everyday.

    Good luck OP . maybe you'll do ok.
    Have you considered stem cell therapy? Apparently it works instant wonders.
  6. by   dirtyhippiegirl
    Quote from calivianya
    Cooking from scratch is always a good idea... if you have the time. Full time work and school means I don't have any free time, so I don't cook.

    Prepackaged foods are not always the devil as far as weight loss goes. Just make sure whatever you eat, you eat fewer calories than you need. Figure out what your BMR is and eat pretty close to that - you'll lose weight. I try to eat around 1200 calories per day when I'm serious about losing weight... and sometimes, that intake looks like a slice of cake, three beers, and then some mostly water vegetable soup the rest of the day.
    We demonize pre-packaged food but purely from a calorie perspective, home made is not always lower calorie (or even necessarily healthier depending on what you're making...)

    Baby steps. Most people can't count calories. They don't actually know what a serving size of anything is and they underestimate basic calorie counts. Using a food scale can be intimidating or tedious, depending on how you feel about it. Same goes with a lot of trendy healthy, low-cal recipes that often involve a lot of prep/steps and even more ingredients.

    It also removes the "but I don't have time" excuse.

    My sister does this from time to time. Gets convinced that the only way she's going to lose weight is through healthy, home cooked meals. It fizzles out because she loses interest. She'd rather be doing other things. You put in all the effort and a kalecabbagequinoa salad just doesn't taste as good as a hamburger. So she swings back to relying heavily on fast food. It's convenient and she's already embraced the black/white notion of good food vs bad food...

    Or she could invest in a few Lean Cuisines and some prepackaged salads...
  7. by   newmail445
    Quote from dirtyhippiegirl
    We demonize pre-packaged food but purely from a calorie perspective, home made is not always lower calorie (or even necessarily healthier depending on what you're making...)

    Baby steps. Most people can't count calories. They don't actually know what a serving size of anything is and they underestimate basic calorie counts. Using a food scale can be intimidating or tedious, depending on how you feel about it. Same goes with a lot of trendy healthy, low-cal recipes that often involve a lot of prep/steps and even more ingredients.

    It also removes the "but I don't have time" excuse.

    My sister does this from time to time. Gets convinced that the only way she's going to lose weight is through healthy, home cooked meals. It fizzles out because she loses interest. She'd rather be doing other things. You put in all the effort and a kalecabbagequinoa salad just doesn't taste as good as a hamburger. So she swings back to relying heavily on fast food. It's convenient and she's already embraced the black/white notion of good food vs bad food...

    Or she could invest in a few Lean Cuisines and some prepackaged salads...
    Try the meal delivery services where they cook food and deliver it to your door. Calories are counted and it's explicitly written what is for breakfast, lunch, and dinner. This cuts down on prep, shopping, and cleaning up time, money, and energy. All of that is important is consistency, which is a defining factor in losing weight. Your sister's experience with fizzling out proves this.
  8. by   calivianya
    Quote from dirtyhippiegirl
    Baby steps. Most people can't count calories. They don't actually know what a serving size of anything is and they underestimate basic calorie counts. Using a food scale can be intimidating or tedious, depending on how you feel about it. Same goes with a lot of trendy healthy, low-cal recipes that often involve a lot of prep/steps and even more ingredients.
    It's hard to count calories with home cooked meals. The only way it really works is if you sit there, measure every single ingredient you put in the recipe exactly, and then when the recipe is done immediately portion it into food containers, making sure they have exactly equal portions, and divide the total calories in the recipe by your number of equal portions.

    If you don't want to recalculate every single time you make something, you have to make it the exact same way with the exact same amount of ingredients. None of this a pinch of this or a pinch of that stuff. Exact measurements only. And what if you need to swap out butter for olive oil because you ran out of butter? If you want to be precise, that's going to involve recalculating the whole recipe.

    Weight Watchers, My Fitness Pal, and others remember your recipe once you save it, so at least it's in there once you've made it once, but again - if there's any slight change, the saved recipe isn't going to be right.

    Whew. What a pain in the butt.

    I have a food scale and I use it occasionally (I fall in the "this is obnoxious and tedious" camp), but I do know exactly how many calories are in that frozen dinner/protein bar/breakfast sandwich, and accounting for that is so much easier.

    I don't know how people cook complex meals and count calories consistently. It's hugely time consuming.
  9. by   newmail445
    Quote from calivianya
    It's hard to count calories with home cooked meals. The only way it really works is if you sit there, measure every single ingredient you put in the recipe exactly, and then when the recipe is done immediately portion it into food containers, making sure they have exactly equal portions, and divide the total calories in the recipe by your number of equal portions.

    If you don't want to recalculate every single time you make something, you have to make it the exact same way with the exact same amount of ingredients. None of this a pinch of this or a pinch of that stuff. Exact measurements only. And what if you need to swap out butter for olive oil because you ran out of butter? If you want to be precise, that's going to involve recalculating the whole recipe.

    Weight Watchers, My Fitness Pal, and others remember your recipe once you save it, so at least it's in there once you've made it once, but again - if there's any slight change, the saved recipe isn't going to be right.

    Whew. What a pain in the butt.

    I have a food scale and I use it occasionally (I fall in the "this is obnoxious and tedious" camp), but I do know exactly how many calories are in that frozen dinner/protein bar/breakfast sandwich, and accounting for that is so much easier.

    I don't know how people cook complex meals and count calories consistently. It's hugely time consuming.
    You're making this unreasonably difficult.

    Close approximations of calories will suffice. For example, in a consistent diet the effect of being 200 calories over each day will have little impact in the grand scheme of exercising, sleeping well, reducing stress, changing food beliefs and habits, reducing calories in, increasing calories out, having a support system, and so on. And losing weight and keeping it off is just that: a complex, long term, consistent act.

    And regarding the example of swapping butter and olive oil, you don't need to "recalculate the whole recipe". Just change the calories from butter with the calories from olive oil.
  10. by   Party_of_five
    I am a huge fan of the 21 Day Fix. It is a workout and nutrition plan. It's not a quick fix like the name implies but rather it teaches you how to eat the right foods in the right portions and you do a daily 30 minute workout. There are 7 different workouts (cardio, yoga, pilates, weight training ect) so you don't get bored. It really works too. Google it.
  11. by   dirtyhippiegirl
    Quote from newmail445
    You're making this unreasonably difficult.

    Close approximations of calories will suffice. For example, in a consistent diet the effect of being 200 calories over each day will have little impact in the grand scheme of exercising, sleeping well, reducing stress, changing food beliefs and habits, reducing calories in, increasing calories out, having a support system, and so on. And losing weight and keeping it off is just that: a complex, long term, consistent act.
    Purely from a mathematical perspective, you're going to gain weight as long as you eat more calories than your body needs to maintain weight. Reducing stress, sleeping well, having a support system, etc probably help with the mental component of keeping weight off but 200 x 365 = 73,000 extra calories a year which if you aren't somehow burning them off unintentionally, adds up to about 20 lbs in weight a year.

    I know plenty of skinny people who don't rigidly count calories, for what it's worth. If they eat a large lunch out, they'll eat a small dinner. If they go on vacation and eat whatever for a week, they cut back on what they eat for the next few weeks. There does need to be an in/out balance.
  12. by   newmail445
    Quote from dirtyhippiegirl
    Purely from a mathematical perspective, you're going to gain weight as long as you eat more calories than your body needs to maintain weight. Reducing stress, sleeping well, having a support system, etc probably help with the mental component of keeping weight off but 200 x 365 = 73,000 extra calories a year which if you aren't somehow burning them off unintentionally, adds up to about 20 lbs in weight a year...
    I should have clarified. ..."being 200 calories over each day..." (over what you planned for that day; not over the amount of calories you lost). Yes, calories in need to be less than calories out.
  13. by   rfmeyer
    The calories in/calories out idea is great, except it is completely false except in extreme conditions. There are vast studies looking at increase and decrease in calories leading to small changes, and then system compensation for homeostasis. I used to believe this same idea until I really became educated on nutrition/DM/obesity. Take a look at the work of Dr Jason Fung on youtube....

    R

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Weight loss for nurses