wearing perfume to work - page 8

thought this would be interesting. what's your policy? i wear a light body splash if any.... Read More

  1. by   Tweety
    It happened to me again yesterday. A patient claimed she went into an asthma attack from the "loud perfume" of my tech and refused to let her in the room. Nothing a bit of ativan didn't fix.
  2. by   caroladybelle
    Quote from Jerico

    What IF, now what IF mouth wash were to cause allergies in patients?

    Does this mean we nurses should also avoid mouthwash? Maybe we should just NOT drink coffee or use breath mints, etc....so we don't have a 1 in a million chance of causing some 1 in a MILLION sensitivity to be triggered!
    Actually since most mouthwashes contain alcohol, they are not good for anyone to use. They are barred for use by patients on many Onco/Hemo floors for that very reason, as they actually cause more damage than anything else.

    Research has demonstrated that oral care with a mild saline rinse, or saline/baking soda rinse to be safer, and quite effective.

    Plus covering up bad breath with mint usually just gives one the minty bad smell aroma...not much of an improvement.
  3. by   sjrn85
    Quote from RoxanRN2003
    Let me hit you with a sledge hammer and then we can talk about sensitivity! cause that's what my head feels like after some self-absorbed 'flowerpot' wafts/walks by. :angryfire Pure and simple, perfume (amongst other obnoxious odors) causes difficulty to some people.
    Uhm, I was being sarcastic. If you read my other posts, you'd know that I don't feel that way at all.
  4. by   sjrn85
    Quote from Tweety
    It happened to me again yesterday. A patient claimed she went into an asthma attack from the "loud perfume" of my tech and refused to let her in the room. Nothing a bit of ativan didn't fix.
    So the pt. was medicted because she complained about someone's perfume? Please tell me I am misreading this!
  5. by   Jessy_RN
    Quote from sjrn85
    So the pt. was medicted because she complained about someone's perfume? Please tell me I am misreading this!
    The patient went into an asthma attack
  6. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    I love the insinuation of hypochondria (or wild imagination) when someone says they wheeze (or their asthma flares up) from strong perfume. It HAPPENS.


    Later.
  7. by   mandana
    Quote from Marie_LPN
    I love the insinuation of hypochondria (or wild imagination) when someone says they wheeze (or their asthma flares up) from strong perfume. It HAPPENS.
    so my mother was just visiting for a week and for a week my rescue inhaler and I were quite intimate. I never use it, except when she visits. Of course, she says, 'Darling, it's Chanel. You couldn't possibly be allergic." The wheezing, sneezing and excruitiating migraines are all in my head!!!! I've begged, I've pleaded, and it's all in my head.

    The selfishness of some people, especially over something so truly inconsequential is astounding!

    Amanda
  8. by   sjrn85
    Quote from Future_RN_Jess
    The patient went into an asthma attack
    She was medicated with Ativan...not an asthma drug, but a mild tranquilizer, giving the impression that her response was "all in her head."
  9. by   Jerico
    Quote from Tweety
    It happened to me again yesterday. A patient claimed she went into an asthma attack from the "loud perfume" of my tech and refused to let her in the room. Nothing a bit of ativan didn't fix.
    Just because someone THINKS it is the perfume, does not mean it actually is.
    There are MANY people (USUALLY WOMEN) who do the "perfume makes me wheeze, etc...) I am NOT saying all, but this happens when it IS a psychological THING.

    I think it is a good idea to use the ativan...to make them RELAX.

    There are many women out there (and yes, I am saying women) who are hypersensitive to EVERYTHING or CERTAIN things...and it is a psychologically INDUCED "idea".

    I'd LOVE to do a study on this to find out "actual sensitivity" vs "psychosensitivity".

    I am not trying to be harsh here - but over the years I have heard so MUCH of this sensitivity thing and to be honest I see it develop and fluxuate. It is almost as if the "sensitive" to perfume person is being over dramatic or something.

    Not to say there are not REAL cases of true sensitivity - but I've seen more NOT than ARE.
  10. by   2002MissRN
    Quote from Tweety
    It happened to me again yesterday. A patient claimed she went into an asthma attack from the "loud perfume" of my tech and refused to let her in the room. Nothing a bit of ativan didn't fix.
    Why on earth would you medicate someone with Ativan who complained of not being able to breathe because your staff wore a "loud perfume"? You should have talked with the patient to "calm" her down and asked the tech not to wear it again, esp if it is hospital policy, or at least just a DAB!!! As a psych nurse I find medicating unnecessarily is just plain wrong. Even on my unit we always try to handle the problem verbally first and meds are always a last resort.
  11. by   TechieNurse
    my 2 cents:
    i suffer from migraines and certain scents can be the trigger.
    i may even like the scent, but there's something in it that causes the reaction; my stomach rolls, my head explodes.

    we have a 'no scent' policy at my hospital, but it's nearly impossible to exclude all scents from your household: deodorant, hair spray, soap, shampoo/conditioner, laundry detergent, fabric softener, dryer sheets etc.

    if i tell someone that they're causing me a reaction, i have a right to refuse them to enter my room & treat me.
    i would find it insulting if i refused someone entering my room based on their 'loud perfume' and my perceived reaction to it (asthma attack) and i was offerend an ativan.
    i might even refuse that nurse if my perception was that she was unconcerned with my issue

    i find it supremely interesting that some people here are attributing 'sensitivity' to 'being all in your head'
    and it is perceived that women have a higher incidence of these 'sensitivities'
    and women are the ones who most often have to fight against the labels of 'hypochondria' or 'dramatic'.
  12. by   gr8rnpjt
    Quote from Jerico
    Just because someone THINKS it is the perfume, does not mean it actually is.
    There are MANY people (USUALLY WOMEN) who do the "perfume makes me wheeze, etc...) I am NOT saying all, but this happens when it IS a psychological THING.

    I think it is a good idea to use the ativan...to make them RELAX.

    There are many women out there (and yes, I am saying women) who are hypersensitive to EVERYTHING or CERTAIN things...and it is a psychologically INDUCED "idea".

    I'd LOVE to do a study on this to find out "actual sensitivity" vs "psychosensitivity".

    I am not trying to be harsh here - but over the years I have heard so MUCH of this sensitivity thing and to be honest I see it develop and fluxuate. It is almost as if the "sensitive" to perfume person is being over dramatic or something.

    Not to say there are not REAL cases of true sensitivity - but I've seen more NOT than ARE.

    Jerico, you brought up such a valid point. At one hospital where I worked, there was a woman with a "sensetivity" to perfume. she was very selective with which perfumes she had a problem with depending on the person wearing the perfume. She ran around hounding me and another woman whom I believe she saw as more her "equal" in the looks department. I had my suspicions about this for months and when she attacked the other woman it kind of sealed the deal for me.
    This "allergic" woman was so territorial about the bathroom, the elevators, the stairwell near her office, she would literally follow us around to make sure we did not use her facilities due to our perfume. If I happened to walk down the hallway by her office, she would yell loudly, "she stinks!"
    I do not wear a heavy perfume. I wear one that I receive a number of complements on. It fits well with my body chemistry. This woman singled me and another woman out because I believe it was a primal, alpha female type thing she had against us, because we had more prestigious jobs, and it made her feel inferior. I am not kidding. And I spoke to a psychologist about this once and was told that there are women out there who feel that the scent of another woman in their particular "territory" makes them crazy.
    The way I handled it, was to picture miss 'allergic" marking her territory as a dog would, and take other hallways and elevators in order to avoid her craziness.
  13. by   mandana
    Quote from Jerico
    I am not trying to be harsh here - but over the years I have heard so MUCH of this sensitivity thing and to be honest I see it develop and fluxuate. It is almost as if the "sensitive" to perfume person is being over dramatic or something.

    Not to say there are not REAL cases of true sensitivity - but I've seen more NOT than ARE.
    OK, so I'm one of those "sensitive" people. Call me dramatic if you wish, I really couldn't care less. BUT, as a nurse, I have to ask you, so what if it is psychological? How is that any different than a "real" sensitivity?? I mean, really. If you are causing someone discomfort, be it "real" or "psychological" what is the difference? You're still causing discomfort and for what reason?

    OR, what if I'm saying that I'm sensitive to it because I think it smells terrible and I don't really want to tell you that?

    C'mon...that's not really the attitude of a healer and it's not even a little bit caring.

    Amanda

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