VIP rooms - page 3

I have been to a few hospitals for clinical rotations and each of them has what are called VIP rooms. In one hosp it was basically a private room, all the other rooms had 2 beds. In the other two,... Read More

  1. by   CountrifiedRN
    Originally posted by sjoe
    "IMO, every pt should be treated the same, regardless of economical status. "

    On what do you base this attitude?

    If people are willing to pay the extra money, as they might for their automobile, home, or lunch, why is this a problem for you or for anyone else?

    If this is the way these people choose to spend their money, so what?

    Isn't it obvious that the extra income/profit can be very useful for the hospital, many of which are in tight financial situations these days?

    In my experience, these VIPs often can and do hire their own private nurses as well, which lessens the workload of the floor nurses AND provides another opportunity for nurses who want to work privately.

    It has been a win-win situation for me when I was a staff nurse.
    I base this attitude on my own personal standards for patient care.

    I don't have a problem with someone who has the money who does want to hire a private nurse, but this is not always the case. In one of the places I mentioned I have seen a DON tell the nurse to pay "extra special attention" to Mr Moneybags in the VIP room, and no, he didn't have a personal nurse. The staff was expected to put priority on him and his family for what ever they needed, over other patients needs. (except in an emergency, I assume) The staff was not too happy about this either, but no one spoke up to the DON about it.

    Call me crazy, but I happen to think that the one place that should have an equal playing field is the hospital. A person should not receive better treatment just because of their social or economic status. It is a problem to me if any other patient is made to feel less worthy because they do not have extra money to fork out for an already outrageously high hospital bill.

    I can understand the allure of VIP rooms for certain people, but why not seperate the VIP rooms from the regular rooms?
  2. by   nimbex
    we don't have VIP rooms, all are private. I just don't see why care would differ here. Take any hall of patients and some naturally try to demand private nursing care while others appreciative for any efforts, we all deal with this daily.

    My problem, loosly linked to this thread is VIP's getting better treatment due to their status. We had a county commissioner in, and the CEO had the hospital provide steak dinners for him and wife with all the thrills through his stay, all at hospital expense.

    I feel that it is unjust situations like this, that can give the perception that VIP rooms equal unfair VIP treatment, and it never itended to be this way.
  3. by   OrthoNutter
    We have isolation rooms....no such thing as private or VIP rooms....if we get a staffer in or such, we will do our best to slot them in an iso room, simply because they're our colleagues and we know we would want the same treatment in return. However everyone knows that infections get priority in those rooms. We have private-share patients and they get the same treatment as everyone else. I don't care how much they or their fund is paying for them to be treated at my hospital, they will get the same treatment as the public patient in the very next bed.
  4. by   semstr
    We have VIP-hospitals here and in the general hospitals there are private rooms of course.
    These VIP-hospitals are being used by people, who pay either cash or have extra insurances for these hospitals/ hotels.
    A lot of famous, beautiful people go there, to become even more beautiful! (have to love these botox-faces!NOT)
  5. by   debRNo1
    Originally posted by OrthoNutter
    We have isolation rooms....no such thing as private or VIP rooms.....
    DITTO here..........

    Private room = Isolation room

    By virtue of how my unit is set up we do have more "one bedded rooms" than the rest of the hospital. Of course we get the infections transferred from other units and the occasional VIP

    I had a VIP over the weekend and it was pure MISERY

    However I did have 7 others to care for and had one CNA for 24 patients, not to mention NO ward clerk.

    Dont know who or how they managed the "private" room but they were soooo demanding and there were sooo many visitors that I couldn't even get in the room. They appeared to be offended when I asked them to exuse themselves while we performed care. There were so many FLOWERS I could smell them down the hall. The dialogue seemed rehearsed and presented loudly in my presence. Everyone was a doctor or a nurse and I summoned the surgeon (at their request) who came RUNNING numerous times and wrote kooky orders, whatever they wanted-they got.

    My w/e ended with one of the doctor daughters interupting report
    to say, " I know your in the middle of report BUT..................
    (blah blah blah )"

    It made for a very tense w/e on the unit and Ill take the MRSA and VRE over a VIP any day.
  6. by   toodky
    At the hospital I work at, there is an entire floor like a "penthouse" for VIP's. They have amenities such as Gourmet chefs, inroom massage, inroom pedicure/manicures. They get robes and houseshoes and have the nices furniture and private bath. The rooms look like a 5 star hotel. It makes me ill!!!!!!!!
  7. by   hogan4736
    Originally posted by sjoe
    "IMO, every pt should be treated the same, regardless of economical status. "

    On what do you base this attitude?

    If people are willing to pay the extra money, as they might for their automobile, home, or lunch, why is this a problem for you or for anyone else?

    If this is the way these people choose to spend their money, so what?

    Isn't it obvious that the extra income/profit can be very useful for the hospital, many of which are in tight financial situations these days?

    In my experience, these VIPs often can and do hire their own private nurses as well, which lessens the workload of the floor nurses AND provides another opportunity for nurses who want to work privately.

    It has been a win-win situation for me when I was a staff nurse.

    If they hire their own private nurses, then do it at home and use the "extra money" to get your admitting doc to round at your house...Think about it, less hospital acquired infection, no one leering into your room, no code blue overhead pages at 0200, etc...

    And "the extra profit being useful for the hospital" I doubt that's what it's used for joe...

    get out of my hospital w/ your VIP room and it's accompanying arrogance...

    sean
  8. by   hogan4736
    Originally posted by fab4fan

    And I have had the misfortune of being in the hosp. and having a roommate find out that I was a nurse...good grief! You get bugged for everything when that happens.

    just a question...how did the patient find out you were a nurse?

    did you mention it to someone...

    now, this is just me, but I've been hospitalized 2wice since I've been an RN, and I told anyone who asked that I was a web page designer each time...I'll only speak up (w/ the RN card) when I see bad nursing care (have done it once, when my wife was giving birth)...Otherwise being an RN (and stating it), (I'll get flamed for this) is IRRELEVANT, as a patient...
  9. by   KevinN
    If the patient has the money, and hospital is providing the accommodations . Why not! I am not going to dictate how people should spend their money. Yes in a perfect world every person would have their own private VIP room. However, until that day comes let us just accept that people with money usually get special privileges and I don't see that changing anytime soon.

    Kevin
  10. by   sjoe
    "get out of my hospital w/ your VIP room and it's accompanying arrogance... "

    That POV is termed "envy."
  11. by   fab4fan
    Originally posted by hogan4736
    just a question...how did the patient find out you were a nurse?

    did you mention it to someone...

    now, this is just me, but I've been hospitalized 2wice since I've been an RN, and I told anyone who asked that I was a web page designer each time...I'll only speak up (w/ the RN card) when I see bad nursing care (have done it once, when my wife was giving birth)...Otherwise being an RN (and stating it), (I'll get flamed for this) is IRRELEVANT, as a patient...
    No...I was in the hosp where I worked, and some of my co-workers came to visit. It's not like I announced it to get attention.

    Sheesh! Anything else you want to pick apart about me?
  12. by   hogan4736
    whoa fab4...just a question and fodder for debate...

    sorry

    I do think that many nurses announce it, and have always wondered why it matters...

    I have been hospitalized where I work, and instructed any visitors to not bring up I was a nurse in an attempt to avoid what you went through.
    Last edit by hogan4736 on Mar 18, '03
  13. by   hogan4736
    "It has been a win-win situation for me when I was a staff nurse."

    That POV is termed "forgetting what nursing is about"

    and WAS a staff nurse being the operative term

    I have had a "VIP" in the hospital, and the idea that management falls over themselves while kissing a** is not only hilarious, but embarassing as a fellow human.

    No one deserves better treatment and care than the next, and the only reason they get it is people like you allowing a caste system within a hospital, the one place that it should not exist.

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