Venting and Advice Needed...Just Can't Do This Anymore! - page 2

OK...this is going to be long, so get comfortable! I was hired for nights...and worked nights for the first three months I was at my new job. There was an occasional day shift thrown in here and... Read More

  1. by   banditrn
    Cotjockey - read your posts as tho someone else were posting them, and imagine what you would tell them.

    It took me over a year to leave a poisoned atmophere at a hospital, but I'd been there for 16 years.
    The first LTC wasn't what I wanted, so I didn't beat myself up over it, and left after 6 months.
    The one I just started at seems better run, and regulated, and better staffed, too, but if things go downhill, I'm outta there. Nothing is worth what the stress I put myself thru, before leaving that hospital, did to my health, and I won't do it again.

    It's worth talking to your management about, but don't let them beat you up.
  2. by   caroladybelle
    If they hired agency - why are the agency nurses doing the CNA work instead of you, or working the odd shifts. Surely, you as the staffer take priority.

    (PS, I am an agency/traveler nurse)
  3. by   NurseCard
    All I can say is, WOW. Sorry you are going through this.

    You know, there was an article in Reader's Digest about the crisis of poor care in nursing homes throughout the country. It featured a nursing home 15 minutes from where I live, that got sued over a man who was neglected, suffered through a bowel impaction and laid in his bed and screamed for relief, and finally suffered a heart attack related to the impaction and died.

    Heck, here's a link to the article:

    Deadly Neglect in U.S. Nursing Homes: Caregiver Neglect

    Anyway, there is a nursing home that is in perfect walking distance from my home that I have actually thought about getting a job at, because gas is so expensive and we would save SO much money. But... I just don't think I can ever do it.
  4. by   jojotoo
    Don't waste your breath talking to your DON. I think you already know how much respect she has for you. Move on.
  5. by   flashpoint
    As soon as I can find another job, I am out of there. I will give two weeks notice but that is is...I think they want 30 days from licensed staff, but I wouldn't know because I still don't have a policy manual and there isn't one available on the floor. I've asked for one several times, but it doesn't appear that they want me to have one. I've sent out some applications, but haven't heard anything yet...I work night shift Monday, have a final exam for a class Tuesday, and work day shift Wednesday. Thursday, I am going to make some phone calls and see what happens.

    This really bites because it could be a really nice job if scheduling were different.
  6. by   RN BSN 2009
    Those are unhumanly hours!!
  7. by   chenoaspirit
    Well, its understandable, due to their attitude, why their staffing is so short! No one could work under those circumstances. I would request a meeting and firmly, but nicely, state that this type of scheduling is affecting your health and your life. If they truly are short staffed, they will try to accomodate you better. If they are going to change schedules, they need to discuss it with you FIRST. It sounds like they expect you to run to their every beckon call. They need to have more respect for you and all their workers if they plan to keep their staff. My family comes FIRST, then my job. I was looking for a job when I found the one I have, I can certainly find another one. My schedule was like yours for a while, My marriage was suffering and my daughter cried everytime I left for work. I couldnt stand myself. I finally told my nurse manager that I just couldnt work like that. I was nice about it, but I let her know I was serious. My schedules now allow me time with my family. If your boss doesnt understand, then she clearly isnt thinking how she/he would feel if in your shoes. I hope it gets better. There are thousands of jobs out there. You may like it on good days, but how many good days do you have and how many days do you have to enjoy other things. Is this job worth it.
  8. by   Dalzac
    There is noway I would ever, ever work those kind of hours,not ever. It is abusive.My advise is quit, working at walmart would be better than that. Find another job.
  9. by   spookygirl
    This sounds terrible to me. I applaud you for sticking it out a lot longer than i would have. :angryfire I would be furious if I were to be treated that way. I agree with many of the other posters when they say it is time for a serious discussion with your DON. I also agree that you should attend your daughter's md appt. I would call off if needed...... and if they wanted to terminate me then so be it. Just remember to always protect your patients and your license at all times. ALSO an interesting side note....... I live in Illinois and we have a law that states we are held to our highest degree. In other words it is ILLEGAL for me to work as a CNA if I have an RN license. funny huh. Well best of luck to you, and you and all the rest of us new grads are in my prayers.
  10. by   rach_nc_03
    Quote from cotjockey
    As soon as I can find another job, I am out of there. I will give two weeks notice but that is is...I think they want 30 days from licensed staff, but I wouldn't know because I still don't have a policy manual and there isn't one available on the floor. I've asked for one several times, but it doesn't appear that they want me to have one. I've sent out some applications, but haven't heard anything yet...I work night shift Monday, have a final exam for a class Tuesday, and work day shift Wednesday. Thursday, I am going to make some phone calls and see what happens.

    This really bites because it could be a really nice job if scheduling were different.
    They are obligated to show you a copy of the policy manual, period. Even without the other horrid crap you're going through with them, it's absolutely insane that they think they can prevent you from seeing the policy manual!! WTH?

    Read up on labor laws for your state. I'm almost positive they're breaking laws. And here's the awful part- if you ended up making an error because of the exhaustion they're causing for you, you'd still end up holding the bag legally. The threat of terminating you for calling out won't matter a whit- you'll be seen as working when it was unsafe for you to do so, of your own volition.

    No matter what, don't miss your daughter's appointment for these people. Seriously, I can't see them firing you- imagine all the shifts they'd have to cover, since you're there nearly all the time!

    Do get out of there as soon as humanly possible. This is a bad situation that is only going to get worse- and they only reason they're continuing to pile it on you is that you haven't quit yet.

    That sucks so much. I'm so sorry you're stuck in this mess.
  11. by   outcomesfirst
    Quote from spookygirl
    This sounds terrible to me. I applaud you for sticking it out a lot longer than i would have. :angryfire I would be furious if I were to be treated that way. I agree with many of the other posters when they say it is time for a serious discussion with your DON. I also agree that you should attend your daughter's md appt. I would call off if needed...... and if they wanted to terminate me then so be it. Just remember to always protect your patients and your license at all times. ALSO an interesting side note....... I live in Illinois and we have a law that states we are held to our highest degree. In other words it is ILLEGAL for me to work as a CNA if I have an RN license. funny huh. Well best of luck to you, and you and all the rest of us new grads are in my prayers.
    Actually, it is not illegal for you to work as a CNA - that said, you will still be held to the standard of RN while performing CNA tasks. For example, instead of reporting to an RN that you think a patient is in acute distress, you would be expected to act in the patients best interest immediately.

    Cotjockey, please get a new job ASAP, you are in a no win situation. While interviewing, say you are changing jobs because you are looking for a new challenge, do not disparage your current assignment schedule - say nothing about it - employers will already know what is going on. You will not be the first they have seen coming from this facility. When they ask for references, give previous employers. List your current employer, but do not permit reference check. If you are asked about this (doubtful - they will already 'know' that you don't want current employer to know you are leaving) As soon as you have a start date - the sooner the better, resign your position. Tell your new employer you have a flexible schedule and can start when they are ready - this is 'code' in hiring, your new employer will know you want out of your job and they will be ok with this. Unless you want to use your current employer as a reference (which they wil probably burn you anyway), do not worry about giving notice - leave them off your resume. Another poster mentioned that you are doing yourself and others a disservice by staying with this employer - I cannot agree more - they will not change as long as they people who 'care so much' about the patients that they will sacrifice themselves. Frankly, if 'everyone' cared so much, we would not have the challenges facing nursing today. Good luck!

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