Venting about a new CNA...this is really, really long! - page 3

We have a new CNA that just started working night shift and she is going to drive me crazy. In the first place, she has been there for a total of five days and she is an expert on every resident in... Read More

  1. by   firstaiddave907
    Sounds like this CNA needs a wake up call
  2. by   DoubleblessedRN
    Quote from cotjockey
    so she called 911 on her cell phone, told them she was going to be stung by wasps
    Was she expecting EMS/fire to stand by?! Boy, she is a piece of work! I read your entire post Cotjockey cuz I know what it's like to work with a difficult partner. I worked with someone like that about a year ago, but only for a few weeks, fortunately. It doesn't sound like she'll last even if she isn't fired. I'll bet she always goes from one job to the next.
  3. by   KellieNurse06
    Quote from Pepper The Cat
    One of her "bright" ideas to make work better was she thought we should tie baggies over the trachs to collect secretions, instead of having to clean the pts when their secretions got too much!:uhoh21: Luckily, she only mentioned this,- never did it!
    She's gone on to another hospital now, good for us, bad for them!
    Are you kidding me??????????????? That is SCARY!!! Ya, lets suffocate people with trachs!!! My daughter has a trach and I nearly spit out my drink right here on my keyboard reading that one...............this person has absolutely no common sense..........that is scary...........:uhoh21:
  4. by   flashpoint
    Quote from medic2ernurse2b
    Was she expecting EMS/fire to stand by?! Boy, she is a piece of work! I read your entire post Cotjockey cuz I know what it's like to work with a difficult partner. I worked with someone like that about a year ago, but only for a few weeks, fortunately. It doesn't sound like she'll last even if she isn't fired. I'll bet she always goes from one job to the next.
    Well, duh! If she got stung, she would die instantly...she wouldn't even be able to flip open the flip phone before her cold dead body hit the ground.

    That wasn't very nice of me to say...sorry.

    The other night nurse has been on vacation for two weeks...tonight was her first night back and she just called me to ask if the new CNA drives me crazy too. I don't think she will last long...she told the other nurse that she is not going to work holidays, she is not going to work when the weather is bad, she is not going to work if her daughter sneezes even once...
  5. by   IMustBeCrazy
    Simple. She is in her probationary period which means she can be terminated WITH NO EXPLANATION. I would pitch this to HR citing the problems you have been having....if they are breathing/have half a brain they should understand this with little explanation.
  6. by   luvkitties
    Quote from IMustBeCrazy
    Simple. She is in her probationary period which means she can be terminated WITH NO EXPLANATION. I would pitch this to HR citing the problems you have been having....if they are breathing/have half a brain they should understand this with little explanation.

    :yeahthat:


    ~Lori
  7. by   Daytonite
    cotjockey. . .please don't misunderstand my intentions here but after I read the initial post something was very clear to me. You are permitting this CNA to suck you into the little games that she plays. And, she is playing quite a few in order to make herself feel and look good among all of you. Once you recognize that this is a good deal of what she is doing with all her talk, don't respond to her. She is looking for these responses, especially with the shocking stories. That is how she knows that she "gotcha". That is her way of getting some kind of control and attention. She is also very insubordinate. She talks so much that it has been difficult for you to distinguish her insubordination from her fast talking. Example: she told you she called the dietary manager at home after you had told her you were going to take care of getting snacks for a patient. She disobeyed your direction. With people like this CNA who are so pleased with listening to themselves talking you have to be very clear when you give them direction. When you are giving direction, particularly with someone like her, you also need to let her know the consequences of any actions that she takes. I would have told her, "You are not to call anyone in the dietary department about this, is that clear? If you do, you will get into trouble for violating the chain of command." Then, the next night after she told me she had called the dietary manager I would have taken her aside and very bluntly told her, "I told you not to call anyone in the dietary department. You were wrong to do this and I have no choice but to write you up and tell the DON about it. You'll probably have to explain to her why you went out of the chain of command to do what you did. When I give you an instruction I expect you to obey it. Don't ever do this again." Second example of insubordination: you told her not to go and make rounds on a group of patients again and wake them up, yet she did it anyway while you were in the restroom. Upon discovery of this I would have taken her aside immediately and told her, "I just told you not to make rounds on those patients or wake them up and you disobeyed me and did it anyway. I'm writing you up again for insubordination. I've told you before that when I tell you to do something I expect you to do it. In this case you unnecessarily disturbed patients" If these two write-ups don't burst her bubble and make her think about either shaping up or quitting I am sure she'll error again. It's in her nature. As for all the jibber-jabber coming out of her mouth. . .there's not much you can do about that except ignore and don't respond to it. Then, you won't get so aggravated. Let her find someone else to talk to or give her some work to do. Surely, there must be cupboards, wheelchairs or something that needs cleaning during the wee hours of the night to get her out of your hair. Ask the DON what needs cleaning around the facility and put her on it. Don't give her a chance to be sitting around shooting off her mouth.
  8. by   canoehead
    That woman is a walking floor show. That is the only way I'd be able to cope with her. Giggle into your sleeve as much as possible, but be sure to write up any patient care issues. I hope you have someone at work to vent with.
  9. by   catlady
    Quote from Daytonite
    cotjockey. . .please don't misunderstand my intentions here but after I read the initial post something was very clear to me. You are permitting this CNA to suck you into the little games that she plays. And, she is playing quite a few in order to make herself feel and look good among all of you. Once you recognize that this is a good deal of what she is doing with all her talk, don't respond to her. She is looking for these responses, especially with the shocking stories. That is how she knows that she "gotcha". That is her way of getting some kind of control and attention. She is also very insubordinate. She talks so much that it has been difficult for you to distinguish her insubordination from her fast talking. Example: she told you she called the dietary manager at home after you had told her you were going to take care of getting snacks for a patient. She disobeyed your direction. With people like this CNA who are so pleased with listening to themselves talking you have to be very clear when you give them direction. When you are giving direction, particularly with someone like her, you also need to let her know the consequences of any actions that she takes. I would have told her, "You are not to call anyone in the dietary department about this, is that clear? If you do, you will get into trouble for violating the chain of command." Then, the next night after she told me she had called the dietary manager I would have taken her aside and very bluntly told her, "I told you not to call anyone in the dietary department. You were wrong to do this and I have no choice but to write you up and tell the DON about it. You'll probably have to explain to her why you went out of the chain of command to do what you did. When I give you an instruction I expect you to obey it. Don't ever do this again." Second example of insubordination: you told her not to go and make rounds on a group of patients again and wake them up, yet she did it anyway while you were in the restroom. Upon discovery of this I would have taken her aside immediately and told her, "I just told you not to make rounds on those patients or wake them up and you disobeyed me and did it anyway. I'm writing you up again for insubordination. I've told you before that when I tell you to do something I expect you to do it. In this case you unnecessarily disturbed patients" If these two write-ups don't burst her bubble and make her think about either shaping up or quitting I am sure she'll error again. It's in her nature. As for all the jibber-jabber coming out of her mouth. . .there's not much you can do about that except ignore and don't respond to it. Then, you won't get so aggravated. Let her find someone else to talk to or give her some work to do. Surely, there must be cupboards, wheelchairs or something that needs cleaning during the wee hours of the night to get her out of your hair. Ask the DON what needs cleaning around the facility and put her on it. Don't give her a chance to be sitting around shooting off her mouth.
    Excellent, excellent advice!
  10. by   hija de dios
    WOA!!! Evidently sounds like you both have major issues , don't let her get to you like that. Now I am sure you are not glued to her all day. Obviously she is what the Dr. ordered! Remember your their for the patients at times it may seem difficult to work in such an ENVIROMENT...But don't take it personal you are proably better than that so why don't you flip the script? Try some reverse psychology on her let her,hear and vent and tell her something nice, Remember we should all try to stay professional.Stay on a mature level, believe me I have been there and done that and then some so people can't aggravate me NOW!Believe That! You take care and please give it a try,o.k.
  11. by   htrn
    I have read every post on this thread with great interest. I work with a CNA on nocs in the hospital that has the same attitude and plays the same games. She has even cornered me and tried to argue with me about my care of patients. She insists on going into pt rooms twice a night to empty garbage and give them ice water despite my specific instructions not to enter a room. I should clarify, I am talking about very stable post-partum mothers - not critical, unstable and scary cardiac patients.

    Unfortunately reporting her and writing her up has not done any good - except get me locked in a room with her by my NM and told not to come out until we worked it out:angryfire :angryfire :angryfire :angryfire

    I am back to working up the gumption to go thru the effort of writing her up again for every infraction. I know she is walking on thin ice due to absenteeism, but she is also going to retire next year. I am tired of hearing how much better things will be when she retires - she needed to go years ago.

    Anyway - I feel for you. Good luck. At least yours is still on probation and hasn't been bounced from department to department for years just to get her to retirement.
  12. by   nursejohio
    Quote from luvkitties
    Wait...just re-read your post...were you implying that since cotjockey was the Charge, she would take the heat if they were soiled/unrepo'd? I'm not sure how to interpret what you mean.
    ~Lori
    From my 3 years as a CNA and almost 2 as an RN, I can attest the the responsibility of the nurses for the actions (or inactions) of the CNA. While what the OP did on one hall may technically be the realm of the aide, the responsibility for it falls squarely on the shoulders of the nurse. If the residents get skin breakdown, the nurse is going to be the one questioned about it, mainly "why didn't you make sure they were turned and dry?" It is the nurses responsibility to make sure the CNAs are doing the things they're supposed to (vitals, turns, baths, accuchecks etc) not the other way around. As an aide, I had to deal with a nurse who'd sit at the desk, reading Cosmo, yelling, "Is anyone gonna get all these lights!?!?!?!" When she said she'd changed someone, I just documented it on the rounds sheet as "Changed per M Lazy, LPN" I wasn't going back around and waking up a patient who had supposedly been changed, but I wasn't going to catch heat when day shift came on and found them soaked either.
  13. by   vampiregirl
    I too agree that Daytonite's advice is excellent- obviously very clear communication (blunt!) and directions are necessary. I've worked with a couple of CNA's who have some of the behaviors/ characteristics as cotjockey's CNA. Most either seem to get their act together quickly or end up leaving... a few stay forever and try to make everyone's life miserable. Maybe having someone who isn't intimitated by her, won't put up with her antics/ attention seeking behavior and is willing to work with her will help her get her act together. I think it is very admirable of cotjockey to be putting the effort to resolving this situation. It sounds like she has the basic skills necessary to do a good job as a CNA. However, it will be her attitude that stands in her way. Good luck!

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