Useless Hospital Committees - page 2

by Ayvah 5,953 Views | 19 Comments

So maybe its just me, but it seems that every hospital has committees focused on 'improving patient care'/customer service, who spend time creating their vision statements and lead hospital retreats about how we have to put the... Read More


  1. 3
    If I could like this a hundred times I would. I'm serving on one now that is about "responsiveness" in the HCAHPS scores. I feel like the attitude is that "if we have a committee, that shows we're working on it. We really don't HAVE to work on it, just say that we're working on it!" Much like their ideas about improving responsiveness scores. They don't actually want to be ABLE to respond more timely. They just want to implement a no-pass call light zone so that an employee merely sticks their head in the room and tells the patient that someone is GOING TO get them what they want, that way the time between request and fulfillment will SEEM shorter! Pure genius, no extra staff required!

    I saw the scores for one facility were in the 90% and asked "So what are they doing right?" The answer was "Ignore them, they have way too many people." Oh, they have more staff, I see. So, they have more staff, their scores are higher, but I'm supposed to "ignore them." Got it.
  2. 2
    I am sick of committees and sick of lame managers. My manager has thought of several innovations this year. The trouble is that these were brought to her by staff on some of the committees she has and ooops, she "forgot' to give credit to those who actually brought forth these ideas. So what is the use of being on one of these committees when you get nothing for it?
    nguyency77 and redhead_NURSE98! like this.
  3. 0
    I consider myself pretty lucky to work in a hospital that has effective committees. They are truly the movers and shakers and get things done. I will say to the op, the "patient satisfaction" committee has a purpose. Satisfaction scores drive reimbursement and it trickles down to employee satisfaction (i.e. bonuses) at least where I work. This is a non-profit hospital and yes we do receive bonuses if patient satisfaction is up.

    Our committees and members are agents of change and have made positive steps regarding patient and employee safety, customer satisfaction, reduction of infections and hospital stays, etc.

    If a committee is not working for you--are you working for it?
  4. 3
    Seems like pt care and safety would improve if the resources put into committees were instead put into an extra nurse each shift. Most of the RNs I know and work with would love to be able to be able to improve patient care and safety, but are just stretched too thin and so are forced to deprioritize some items to the bottom of the to do list.
  5. 1
    I just learned today that when our computer (from our assessments) show a patient is a falls risk we are to put on the bed alarm. We do if that person is confused and weak and at a real risk of falling. But our system puts a walking, talking, competent person with taking 4 meds a day as a falls risk, just the number, not the type of drug counts. If we do this we will be running into their rooms more to turn off the alarms than doing real patient care. And if e order set calls for SCDs we are to use them, which we do for total care pts, not ambulatory people! This is something that used to be our nursing judgment now we have to get them dc'd and have the patients refuse the SCDs when they are able and willing to get up and walk. Committees may have good intentions, but they are never the people that do the direct care - at least in my facilit. Totally useless unless you have bedside nurses and the administration is willing to listen.
    redhead_NURSE98! likes this.
  6. 0
    Too many people don't have common sense and that is why they need those committees. People can sound VERY rude on the phone and that is why people spend tons of time scripting things. Those little things make a big impact on patient satisfaction.
  7. 1
    IMHO - facility committees freq fall into the same bucket as 'mandatory' inservices and those 'mandatory' staff meetings.

    I'm reminded of the proverb - "the road to hell is lined with good intentions, but heaven is full of good works".

    As my mom used to say' "they meant well".

    If only I had a nickel...
    anotherone likes this.
  8. 1
    for the most part....as useful as teats on a bull....as we country folk are wont to say....
    amoLucia likes this.
  9. 0
    Quote from Pjking227
    I just learned today that when our computer (from our assessments) show a patient is a falls risk we are to put on the bed alarm. We do if that person is confused and weak and at a real risk of falling. But our system puts a walking, talking, competent person with taking 4 meds a day as a falls risk, just the number, not the type of drug counts. If we do this we will be running into their rooms more to turn off the alarms than doing real patient care. And if e order set calls for SCDs we are to use them, which we do for total care pts, not ambulatory people! This is something that used to be our nursing judgment now we have to get them dc'd and have the patients refuse the SCDs when they are able and willing to get up and walk. Committees may have good intentions, but they are never the people that do the direct care - at least in my facilit. Totally useless unless you have bedside nurses and the administration is willing to listen.
    Yyyyyyyyyep. CPOE has brought about doctors who lazily add an order set and every single thing in that order set, like daily weights, TEDS and SCD's for every patient, etc. Ridiculous.
  10. 0
    Oh my gosh. I couldn't agree more. I lost all faith in our committee process when they asked us for our anonymous suggestions, and then promptly ignored all of them.


Top