upset about title - page 2

I recently took a job at a local hospital as an intern and spoke with a new grad who told me that her title for her first year (as stated on her name badge) is not RN, but CNR-clinical nurse... Read More

  1. by   rninme
    Quote from traumaRUs
    I would not work for this institution.
    :yeahthat:
  2. by   gauge14iv
    In some states, that would not even be legal - you might check with your BNE/BON
  3. by   Antikigirl
    Yeah, this doesn't seem to be a good identifier for patients to be able to know what your title/job is.

    Now for me, I have my name and RN...but since I am new with this company I have a sticker on my badge saying "new team member"...that seems to be a nicer way of doing that! I keep that till my 3 month review.
  4. by   mydesygn
    Quote from TriageRN_34
    Yeah, this doesn't seem to be a good identifier for patients to be able to know what your title/job is.

    Now for me, I have my name and RN...but since I am new with this company I have a sticker on my badge saying "new team member"...that seems to be a nicer way of doing that! I keep that till my 3 month review.

    I find it really sad that the existing nursing staff at that facility allowed this practice to start and did nothing to stop it.
  5. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    Quote from GooeyRN
    I dont like it. You earned the title! If they want to add something after the title, or before it, thats fine. But you earned the RN title!
    :yeahthat:
  6. by   CaseManager1947
    From my understanding, and remember I graduated a few (!!!??? ha) years back, our licenscing examination is administered by the State, BON grants title of RN, LPN, LVN, ARNP, whatever, after having met certain requirements which arise out of each state's nurse practice act. I 'd check with your BON, as others have suggested. Please keep us posted on the progress of your journey down this career bump. And welcome to nursing and All Nurses.

    Morghan, ARNP Kansas
  7. by   HeartsOpenWide
    I would think that they would legally have to put RN....if you passed the boards you are legally a RN....Its not like it is the supermarket and you need a button that says "In training"...hello you went to nursing school and graduated your not a resident...IMO
  8. by   ZASHAGALKA
    I wouldn't work there.

    From the Texas 2005 NPA, in the Introduction:

    "Once licensed, you are authorized to use the title "RN" or "LVN" and are required to wear a name tag identifying yourself as a RN or LVN while providing patient care."

    ~faith,
    Timothy.
  9. by   TiffyRN
    The hospital I worked for several years ago was going to try this with the LPN's. What they were doing was redesigning their care model and getting rid of dozens of LVN positions replacing them with "patient care assistants". They were going to allow the LPN's to remain employed there are PCA's but they would not have that title.

    It didn't go over. The union came to town (we were non-union) stirred up some ruckus and all of a sudden the LPN's were no longer losing their positions and titles. Oh, and the union wound up not establishing there but it worked to scare some sense into that hospital at least temporarily. I left the state a few months after. Don't miss them.

    I bed your state BON would defend your right to wear a big pin that says "RN". I thought that was being strongly advocated by all the big nursing organizations.

    The ANA has a sanctioned RN pin as they feel all RN's should be clearly identified to promote public awareness. I would post the link but I'm not sure it's ok to link to a site that sells items. Anyway, it's easy enough to look up on ANA's official site.
  10. by   max1x
    As others have said, once you pass the boards you have every right to identify yourself as an RN. No employer has the right to prevent you from doing this. The RN title is granted by state law. Employers can't mess with that.
    Some employers try to make titles ambiguous so that patients won't find out how few real RNs they have; and how much care is provided by ancillary staff.
  11. by   angel337
    how can they legally do that?? i would be upset too and probably would not take the job for that reason alone. little things like this is what makes nursing so hard to rise as a profession and get the respect that we deserve.
  12. by   Elisheva
    I'd ask for the hospital for the state nursing guidelines for safe practice for those holding the title of "clinical nurse resident". Are you covered under your license as a "CNR" - whatever the heck that is?

    I wouldn't let the hospital get away with that. You have a legal responsibility and legal standards of practice as an RN. Has someone else defined the standards of the CNR?

    BS.
  13. by   RNsRWe
    Hopefully, after reading all these responses to your query, you're taking this issue further up the food chain.

    I am an RN licensed and registered in the State of New York. You want me to wear a (smaller) button in addition to my properly designated name badge that says I'm in their residency program? Sure. You want me to replace MY legal credentials with a made-up term the hospital likes? Stick it.

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