University of Utah Medical Center implements new dress code - page 2

As had been said here in the past, patients couldn't tell the housekeepers from the nurses. There is another link in the story to the Desert News article.... Read More

  1. Visit  Nurse Joey profile page
    0
    Though I don't like it, I agree with the color code system. Patients can get confused and knowing who's wearing what color can alieviate some of the problems. And legally speaking it simplifies things in a law suit or investigation (ex. the lady in green scrubs took my wallet, and let's say green is respiratory.) Btw what is *other* staff? Are they the ones that come out of the basement at night?
  2. Visit  Lisa, MA profile page
    0
    I prefer whites because bleach is cheap and easy to use! The colored scrubs hold the stains far worse if you ask me.
  3. Visit  cherrybreeze profile page
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    Quote from Paco386

    Oh, and PLEASE stay away from the BROWN and YELLOW, they are NOT pleasing colors for hospital scrubs at ALL!
    Hey now, I have a pair of brown scrubs that is actually a very beatiful color, and I would get a lot of compliments on them. They only stay in my closet now because I gained weight and they don't fit. If (when!) I lose those extra pounds, they'll be the first set I wear!
  4. Visit  Lisa, MA profile page
    0
    I like brown and yellow.
  5. Visit  Tait profile page
    0
    I actually enjoy having a dress code. (We recently went navy or white for RNs) Floating to a new floor and figuring out who to ask for a PIXIS witness is a heck of a lot easier!

    However I still don't understand why there are a crop of food service providers that wear navy blue as well...

    Tait
  6. Visit  cherrybreeze profile page
    0
    Quote from juliaann
    i like that my hospital's jobs are differentiated between by scrub color. nurses wear navy, cnas wear khaki, rt wears maroon, lab/phlebotomy is royal blue, radiography/sonography is teal, surgery/docs/housekeepers all wear the ceil hospital-issue scrubs, and sometimes docs will wear a non-assigned color, like black or orange scrubs - or business casual and a lab coat.

    it works well for us, and the patients catch on quick who they should ask for what.

    i find this funny. the goal of color coding per title to distinguish employees from each other, but then let's put the docs and housekeepers in the same thing.

    i don't mind the idea of color coding, as long as it isn't white!! bleach may be able to use, yes, but bleach doesn't keep you from being able to see most undergarments, etc, though it. i know there are ways around that, but it's not the easiest thing to do, and i much prefer just being able to get dressed and go.

    i also don't like childish patterns on nurses that work with the adult population. i am not a fan of patterns much in general, or bright and neon colors. i am pretty specific in my taste for the scrubs i buy myself...black or navy pants (and black or navy shoes and socks), dark or plain scrub tops (ie, red, navy, dark purple, gray, etc). i have a couple of patterns that i like, but they're not too loud, like a navy/red/dark green small plaid. some people look great in lighter/pastels, but they're not for me. in neon pink you'd see my arse coming from a mile away.
  7. Visit  nicole109 profile page
    2
    I personally think that the color coding is ridiculous! It reminds me of my days in Catholic school, and it makes me think that we don't have the ability to dress ourselves in the morning...what happened to introducing yourself before you touch your patient? You have to verify who they are before you give them meds or a treatment, don't you? Shouldn't you be telling them who you are and what you will be doing to them?
    Hoozdo and Faeriewand like this.
  8. Visit  cherrybreeze profile page
    1
    Quote from nicole109
    I personally think that the color coding is ridiculous! It reminds me of my days in Catholic school, and it makes me think that we don't have the ability to dress ourselves in the morning...what happened to introducing yourself before you touch your patient? You have to verify who they are before you give them meds or a treatment, don't you? Shouldn't you be telling them who you are and what you will be doing to them?
    I do agree with some of this, too. *Most* of us can dress ourselves appropriately for work, the problem is the few that can't seem to grasp the concept. They spoil it for all.

    We have big badges that fit under our name badges that say RN, LPN, or CNA on them in big letter. That seems to help, some. I agree that if we're identifying ourselves to our individual patients, that should suffice; I think the problem arises when a patient or visitor or whatever is seeing staff in the hallway...if they are looking for an RN, it's going to be hard to tell who's who. Our ER went to color coding...RN's in navy, CNA/techs in maroon, etc. I am not sure what the LPN color is, maybe dark green? The problem I see with THAT is, if you're not TOLD who is wearing each color, it doesn't mean much. Are they going to post a sign in all the ER rooms stating what each color means? Other depts, like lab, RT, and housekeeping, can wear whatever colors they want, so if they show up in one of the assigned colors, that is going to be confusing also. My facility was going to start this process in the ER and possibly implement it housewide. They haven't yet, but I wouldn't mind, I suppose...I like navy blue :heartbeat, in fact, I already have a set of all navy that I love wearing, it's one of my favorite colors.

    I would love to see depts/positions that don't need to be in scrubs stop wearing them. All but one of our HUC's wear scrubs. For the one that is also a CNA, I think it's fine...she'll leave the desk to help with a boost, a transfer, etc, if someone needs a hand. For the one that isn't also a CNA, why is she in scrubs? When RN's and she are at the desk, it's confusing to anyone coming up to the desk to ask a question. Housekeeping wears scrubs, too, and I think it's unnecessary. Our dietary staff wears black slacks and either a fuschia or orange polo with the facility logo on it, and I think that would be a good combo for housekeeping staff.
    Batman25 likes this.
  9. Visit  Batman25 profile page
    3
    US, dietary, housekeeping, janitorial, etc. don't need to be in scrubs. Don't have CNAs in the same color as nurses as it just increases the confusion. Put the nurses in one color, CNAs in another, RT in another etc.
  10. Visit  imintrouble profile page
    3
    Quote from nicole109
    I personally think that the color coding is ridiculous! It reminds me of my days in Catholic school, and it makes me think that we don't have the ability to dress ourselves in the morning...what happened to introducing yourself before you touch your patient? You have to verify who they are before you give them meds or a treatment, don't you? Shouldn't you be telling them who you are and what you will be doing to them?
    On any given day a pt may see...lab,dietary,respiratory therapy, PT,ST,OT, case management, nursing management, nursing, cna, MD, PA, NP, Xray, housekeeping, maintainance. I introduce myself and I know every one of the above does also. How many days in the hospital do you think it would take for the pt to keep the above straight? Especially if the pt has a different nurse, cna, etc...... every day. Where I work does not have a dress code, but if it did I'd comply without a complaint. I do not find uniforms insulting. If it is in the best interest of the pt, that makes my job easier.
  11. Visit  PacoUSA profile page
    0
    Quote from cherrybreeze
    Hey now, I have a pair of brown scrubs that is actually a very beatiful color, and I would get a lot of compliments on them. They only stay in my closet now because I gained weight and they don't fit. If (when!) I lose those extra pounds, they'll be the first set I wear!
    Quote from Lisa, MA
    I like brown and yellow.

    OK, I should explain that the reasoning for my distaste of brown and yellow scrubs in a hospital is more because they resemble the color of bodily excretions (there, I said it) and I guess as a patient I would prefer to have more pleasiing colors around me (blues, purples, even hunter green). Bright red for that matter might also be a no-no if you think about it. Maroon is nice, though ... like fine wine.

    OK, you may call me psychotic now ...
  12. Visit  cherrybreeze profile page
    0
    Quote from Paco386
    OK, I should explain that the reasoning for my distaste of brown and yellow scrubs in a hospital is more because they resemble the color of bodily excretions (there, I said it) and I guess as a patient I would prefer to have more pleasiing colors around me (blues, purples, even hunter green). Bright red for that matter might also be a no-no if you think about it. Maroon is nice, though ... like fine wine.

    OK, you may call me psychotic now ...
    I did know what you meant. The brown scrubs I have, though, are more of a rich, coffee/chocolate brown, not...poop brown.
    I do have a red top, though....
  13. Visit  Not_A_Hat_Person profile page
    0
    I think color-coding the staff is a good idea, as long as the nurses don't have to wear white. I can live with white tops, but not white bottoms. They show too much, and are very hard to keep clean, especially at certain times of the month.

    I volunteered in an ED where everyone but the nurses were color-coded. Housekeeping wore blue and white striped dresses or shirts and navy pants. Clerical staff wore maroon (later navy) polo shirts and khakis. Techs wore navy polo shirts and navy scrub pants. Transport wore black polo shirts and khaki pants. Volunteers had navy blazers. Researchers wore green tops (a few studies were going on). Doctors wore the traditional white jacket, with business casual. Nurses wore whatever they wanted, usually ciel blue scrubs. The only stood out because everyone else was color-coded.

    Hospitals should crack down on who wears scrubs. There's no need for janitors, unit secretaries, medical records, transport, or anyone else who doesn't do patient care to wear scrubs.
    Last edit by Not_A_Hat_Person on Mar 21, '10 : Reason: more information


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