Unionized workers?

  1. Its me again, I'm annoying sorry. But I'm exploring nursing ... there is no union with nursing? And is it because noone can reunite them? I"m surpirsed the ANA hasn't gotten up and done anything.

    As I read through these threads, I notice common complaints and bickering between everyone, but what can be done about it? Anything? If nurses unionized would that help? I know I am speaking without experience and therefore would speak out of ignorance, but many of you related nursing crisis to teaching crisis. Now teaching is turning around, salaries and benefits are up ... mostly unionized teachers. Same thing with skilled labor ... Doctors have the AMA ... what do nurses have?

    I guess this also goes with the benefits thread I started!!!
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  2. 4 Comments

  3. by   -jt
    <there is no union with nursing? And is it because noone can reunite them? I"m surpirsed the ANA hasn't gotten up and done anything.>

    To correct that misconception -

    100,000 unionized staff nurses in the ANA most certainly did get up & do something about that.

    They demanded a national union & made it happen -- Twenty-six unionized state associations of the ANA, (which is all of the ANA state assoc that have union services, except Hawaii - for now) - united and formed an RN national labor union, affiliated with the ANA. Its called the United American Nurses (UAN)/AFL-CIO.

    It was several years in the making & is brand new, up & running into its 3rd year. It consists of over 100,000 unionized ANA nurses from all over the country (including the South & "right-to-work" at-will states) - all of them working staff RNs and only working staff RNs (meaning direct-pt-care RNs in hospitals, nursing homes, surgical centers, dialyisis centers, clinics, schools, home care, etc - including full time, part time, and per diem RN staff).

    The UAN is run by & for the working staff RN. The union's president, leadership, and board of directors are all staff RN members who are elected by the other staff RN members. The UAN is the largest RN union in the nation. In 2001, it became the 3rd largest union of all unions within the AFL-CIO, and was elected by the other unions to hold a seat on the AFL-CIO Executive Board. That means that unionized staff RNs are in a position of political power in the house of labor in this country.

    The following state nurses assocs have union programs & are already part of the UAN:

    Alabama
    Alaska
    Colorado
    District of Columbia
    Florida
    Georgia
    Illinois
    Indiana
    Iowa
    Kansas
    Kentucky
    Michigan
    Minnesota
    Missouri
    Montana
    Nevada
    New Jersey
    New York
    North Carolina
    Ohio
    Oregon
    US Virgin Islands
    Utah
    Washington State
    West Virgina
    Wyoming...

    ...With over 100,000 UAN unionized working staff RNs throughout those states - all of them members of the ANA as well.

    Nurses in these states and even those who live in states that aren't on this list, can contact the UAN directly for more info.

    A new website is being constructed, but the old one is still up at www.UANnurse.org

    also, see http://www.UANnurse.org/uan/organize/
    Last edit by -jt on Jan 7, '03
  4. by   nur.bmb
    Our facility has had a nurses union for 13 years. We work in Ohio and are represented by the Lawyers and Organizing Specialists of the Ohio Nurses Association. We do not profess to have wonderful working conditions, but overall the situation is much better than before we organized. We survey our nursing staff to find out the issues that concern them most and then when we have contract negotiations, we work toward the best contract to help the most staff. We were the first local unit to have NO MANDATORY OT in our contract.
    Some states are 'right to work' states and do not support unions for any profession. Check with your state Nurses Association, or the above mentioned UAN (United American Nurse) site.
    Good Luck
    Organizing is difficult-you need to work together-but is definately worth the effort.
  5. by   -jt
    <Now teaching is turning around, salaries and benefits are up ... mostly unionized teachers. Same thing with skilled labor ... Doctors have the AMA ... what do nurses have?>

    some have exhaustion. some have a disbelief that they can change anything. and some still have fear.

    but some don't.

    for a quick glimpse at what unionized ANA RNs of the United American Nurses/AFL-CIO have been accomplishing at their workplaces around the country & in their state legislatures, see also:

    UAN News
    http://www.uannurse.org/uan/news.htm

    Nurses win improvements in staffing, working conditions
    http://allnurses.com/forums/showthre...threadid=25695

    Ohio Nurses Assoc & its members are a part of it.
    Last edit by -jt on Jan 7, '03
  6. by   -jt
    Nurses in every state have the right to be part of a union & have an equal say with their employer in the decision making that affects their working conditions, practice, & terms of employment. "Anti-union state" or not.

    I hope those posts help answer some of your questions.


    http://www.UANnurse.org/uan/organize/
    Last edit by -jt on Jan 8, '03

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