Union is in

  1. Well the Union is in. I did vote No, but I had my reasons. The problem is that there is a division between the NO, and YES nurses, and thats a shame. I went into work the other night and congrats my co-workers on their victory. I stated lets move on and work together on our new support system. I personally don't have any problems with my co-workers, yet you have the pettys out there who create the tension and inbalance the work place. My concern is..... What nurses are going to take the time out to advocate for the contract and see that the needs of the nurses , patient, and Hospital are balanced and prudent. I told one co-worker that I would want to be involved, eventhough I voted NO, I feel that I am honest and I would want to be apart of the Implementation process. It would be a great learnig experience. What are some of your opinions on this idea of mine?
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  2. 7 Comments

  3. by   Louie18
    Listen to me please.
    The direction the profession is travelling is one requiring strong, firm representation.
    Not bunches of little unions, (but even that is better than none)
    If not you will all be as segregated among yourselves than any could realize.
    Unionism is fair (as long as you keep tight rein on your elected leaders I mean TIGHT now!)
  4. by   Navy Nurse
    Good luck. I only have a little experience with unions and most were non productive. Now you even have less money because you are paying your union dues and just think your money is making someone at the top of the union very rich.
  5. by   -jt
    Originally posted by Navy Nurse:
    [B]Good luck. I only have a little experience with unions and most were non productive. Now you even have less money because you are paying your union dues and just think your money is making someone at the top of the union very rich
    yet another misconception & untrue blanket statement. FYI, the nursing reps at the union which is now representing the nurses at her hospital (my union, incidentally) do not even earn the same high salaries that they negotiate & win for the RNs they represent. And our union dues are just 1% of our salaries. In our association, the latest hospital to conclude their contract negotiations has their nurses earning a 22% raise. So whats 1% in union dues??? Well worth it in my book.

    Anyway, congratulations on choosing the best collective bargaining representative for Rns in the Northeast and welcome to the club! Its a great organization. Please consider becoming involved on all levels. Especially important will be the labor/management committee & the negotiating committee, as well as the executive council at your facility. Its a lot of work & responsibility. You are It. The strength of your unit lies within each of you. Stop by & get to know the rest of us... http://www.NYSNA.org

    >Date Set for Shore Memorial Union Election - Somers Point, New Jersey
    >The hospital's 400 registered nurses are seeking to establish the New York>State Nurses Association (NYSNA) as their collective bargaining representative >

    NYSNA Elected by RNs at Shore Memorial Hospital in New Jersey !NYSNAs First Collective Bargaining Unit Outside of New York State
    SOMERS POINT, NJ, APRIL 5, 2001 - The New York State Nurses Association (NYSNA) has been elected by the 400 registered nurses at Shore Memorial Hospital to be their collective bargaing representative because of:
    Low staffing - which has caused the frustrated nurses to work excessive overtime and care for more patients than they feel is
    safe.
    An inequitable salary structure - that did little to reward veteran nurses for years of dedicated service and was not competitive with other area hospitals.
    A health benefit plan - that was not up to the industry standard and required RNs to cover the cost of their own insurance.
    And most importantly:
    their desire to have a voice in the decisions that affect their own practice and their ability to care for their patients.

    "Management has been working these nurses until they're ready to drop. That's not a good environment for safe patient care," said Marvin Moschel, lead organizer for NYSNA. "The nurses wanted someone to stand up with them, someone to help them fight for better working conditions.""The nurses
    chose NYSNA because it is a union that is run by registered nurses," Moschel said. "This means NYSNA's representatives have a better understanding of the specific problems nurses encounter on a daily basis in their practice."The next step will be to draw up a set of rules for the bargaining unit, elect officers, form committees, and develop proposals for a first contract. Negotiations for new bargaining units usually
    start within three months after the election.Shore Memorial is the first facility the 100-year old Nurses Association will represent outside of New York state. NYSNA will provide collective bargaining services with the permission of and-through an agreement with-the New Jersey State Nurses Association. Throughout New York state, NYSNA has been working to make an RN's workplace safer and economically
    secure. It has been fighting attempts by hospital administrators to cut costs by cutting corners on nursing care and lobbying for legislation to protect nurses who speak out against poor patient care. Its four-year "Ask for a Real Nurse" campaign helped to make the public aware of the dangers of health care restructuring. NYSNA nurses continue to lead the fight patient as well as nurse safety. With more than 33,000 members, NYSNA
    is the leading organization for registered nurses in New York state and is one of the largest representatives of RNs for collective bargaining in the nation. A multi-purpose organization, NYSNA fosters high standards for nursing education and practice and works to advance the profession through legislative activity...." http://www.nysna.org

  6. by   OC_An Khe
    By all means take part, especially the negotiating committee. It will be excellent expirience. A local is only as good as its members participation, not just at the time of voting but on a day to day basis.
    Good Luck
  7. by   Tiara
    Truthfully, I cannot imagine anyone at that hospital being opposed to change. They have been top-heavy at the management level for years and if the staffing is good now, that's something new. Nurses who worked there for years have become very disillusioned, so maybe the union will help.
  8. by   lsmo
    I think if you now have a union to work with that you are smart to get on board and help to shape the agenda at your workplace. Good for you for keeping an open mind and for honestly voting your conscience--even if it is misguided--HAHA justmessin'...There will always be nay-sayers with ANY change so expect a rough start with your new union. Don't let your disgruntled nurses bury their heads in the sand---use your newfound representation to get what you need at your workplace. Hang in there. Best wishes...


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    L.Smo RN
  9. by   pickledpepperRN
    Good for you!
    Sometimes the best patient advocates vote "no" for various reasons.
    Your fellow nurses need to hear your opinion, so try to get elected to the team. If not attend meetings, stay informed, and vote for what you think is best for nurses and patient care.
    Oh, and you are invited to visit www.calnurse.org

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