Union hospital pays less than other hospitals in the same system..?

  1. Does anyone have a reasonable explanation for this? You're paying union dues to be paid less.
    I want to work at said hospital... But it seems like BS to me.

    I'd be taking a pay cut and be forced to pay union dues.
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  2. 11 Comments

  3. by   LadyFree28
    I don't know...most Union hospitals in my area (whether I can join or not) have higher wages than non-union hospitals.
  4. by   pixiestudent2
    Quote from LadyFree28
    I don't know...most Union hospitals in my area (whether I can join or not) have higher wages than non-union hospitals.
    That's honestly was my assumption was about unions... Was they negotiated higher pay... I really don't understand how the nurses are benefitted from being unionized if they are paid less than other nurses in the same health care system.
  5. by   LadyFree28
    Quote from pixiestudent2
    That's honestly was my assumption was about unions... Was they negotiated higher pay... I really don't understand how the nurses are benefitted from being unionized if they are paid less than other nurses in the same health care system.
    Depends on how strong the union is, as well as how well is your job protected, as well; this hospital may have sacrificed higher wages for better staffing ratios, mandatory breaks, and a better grievance process.
  6. by   joanna73
    Quite possibly this facility has a weak union. Wages are usually at the forefront of the bargaining agenda.
  7. by   NOADLS
    A few considerations here. The salary might not be on par, but what kind of benefits come with the unionized job? Do you have a better staffing ratio? How about health insurance? Shift differentials? Overtime pay? Subsidized meals? Employee wellness programs?

    There are many indirect compensation pieces that you might be missing out on which can add up rather quickly. You might be the type (like myself) who would rather work where the wage is higher and the indirect compensation is less. The place that is not unionized likely realizes the unionized place will offer many benefits and has opted to pay a higher hourly in order to appear as the employer of choice.
  8. by   windsurfer8
    Where i am we get paid very well. I am sticking Union. They force the hospital to provide us a living wage. Works for me!
  9. by   pixiestudent2
    Quote from NOADLS
    A few considerations here. The salary might not be on par, but what kind of benefits come with the unionized job? Do you have a better staffing ratio? How about health insurance? Shift differentials? Overtime pay? Subsidized meals? Employee wellness programs?

    There are many indirect compensation pieces that you might be missing out on which can add up rather quickly. You might be the type (like myself) who would rather work where the wage is higher and the indirect compensation is less. The place that is not unionized likely realizes the unionized place will offer many benefits and has opted to pay a higher hourly in order to appear as the employer of choice.
    I work for the same company, but a different hospital. We all go to orientation together, and I'm fairly certain benefits are exactly the same.
    It's baffling..

    Maybe it's the ratios...
  10. by   Anonymous865
    It is possible that they are paying better at the non-union facilities to prevent them from wanting to unionize. I know of a hospital system that had 6 non-union hospitals and acquired 1 union hospital. They worked very hard to keep the other facilities from wanting to unionize.

    It is possible the union negotiated a multi-year contract. The non-union hospitals may have recently had a wage increase and the union hospital may not get a wage increase until the contract expires and they renegotiate. In other words it may just be a timing issue.
  11. by   Ruby Vee
    Everything I wanted to mention has already been said, so I'll just second the notion of double checking to make sure that benefits, staffing ratios, policies re: breaks or floating or mandatory overtime, scheduling policies, etc. aren't better at the Union hospital. A union contract is about more than hourly pay -- mine negotiated a grievance policy, staffing policies, a policy regarding overtime and many other benefits that made it a more attractive place to work.
  12. by   Ladyscrubs
    My hospital is union. Pays the least amount in the area, yet the health insurance is great, and eat your heart out, they offer free GED classes, so as soon as I finish with my NP, I am going to take advantage of all the benefits my union offers!
  13. by   pixiestudent2
    Well as it turns out, I was wrong. The hospital itself is unionized. Except for the unit I applied to, the units that are unionized, don't post their pay scale in the job listings.
    Do you guys think it'd be appropriate thing to inquire about during an interview?

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