'Uniform' Dress Code - page 3

I was prompted to join a nursing forum today so I could research what my employer is implementing as far as a new dress code. Although the committee who drafted this new policy stated that this was... Read More

  1. by   fromtheheartRN
    Thank you for your responses.
    Please keep them coming!!!!
  2. by   jojotoo
    Quote from swtooth
    I am a nursing student who must wear wine colored scrubs and a white jacket, which I have no problem with.

    The problem is that when you go through one vender to provide scrubs it seems to give them permission to charge an arm and a leg for them. We have to go through a particular vender because they are the only ones who have the school patch. It is very hard to get through nursing school as just a torso, as I had to give up my other arm and leg for my books.

    Swtooth
    With that attitude, I bet your instructors just love you!!
  3. by   NursePhish
    The facility I work for very recently decided to implement a dress code where each area wears a specific color. All nurses in Midnight blue, CNA/techs in sage green, etc.
    The only problem I am finding with being forced (yes i said forced) to wear their dictated uniforms, is that we are being required to order them through a specific company so that the scrubs can be embroidered with the hospital logo. The hospital is only paying for our first two sets of scrubs. Beyond that we are required to order them through this company and pay for not only the scrubs but for the custom embroidery. So what happens when maybe sometime down the line, I choose to change facilities?? I am then stuck with a closet full of midnight blue scrubs embroidered with another facilities logo on them. It's possible if I change jobs, the new place i would be going might be wearing the same color, but what are the chances they would be open to me wearing scrubs with another facilites name embroidered on them?
    If we are being required to order additional scrubs with the hospital logo on them, doesn't that become a facility specific uniform that the company should pay for?
    Just another little added note about uniform fairness....the dietary staff at our facility were recent required to change uniforms to a more "chef" looking uniform. Not only are they charged for the "rental" of these uniforms but they are also charged a cleaning fee. Crazy isn't it?
  4. by   SuesquatchRN
    I choose to wear white. I don't find laundering them to be any more of a problem that anything else.

    Patients and families love it. They can spot me a mile away and call me by my name - Nurse.
  5. by   Retired R.N.
    Quote from Suesquatch
    I choose to wear white. I don't find laundering them to be any more of a problem that anything else.

    Patients and families love it. They can spot me a mile away and call me by my name - Nurse.
    Not only do your patients and families like the white uniform, they probably are very glad you are happy to be recognized as a nurse.

    As for laundering the white uniforms, I was usually able to find a good professional laundry that did beautiful work at very reasonable prices, and I considered it a worthwhile investment in my mental health.
  6. by   SuesquatchRN
    Quote from Retired R.N.
    Not only do your patients and families like the white uniform, they probably are very glad you are happy to be recognized as a nurse.
    They also view it as respectful. And really, when one has sick people with sometimes limited cognitive abilities, it doesn't matter how fried they are, the recognize the iconic nurse figure.

    Oh, I wear dresses and white hose sometimes, esp on holidays. That really tickles people!

  7. by   RGN1
    In the UK hospital (& often community setting too) we all wear a uniform determined (& paid for - with a possible deposit requirement) by the hospital where we work. Sometimes the hospital even launders the uniform too.

    Personally I think it's a good thing because everyone knows who you are & what you do. It doesn't bother me & it helps patients identify who they are talking to.
  8. by   nservice
    As a new graduate, I worked in a hospital with this uniform policy. I personally liked it. I was able to tell who was who. More professional? I don't know. The one problem that we keps experiencing was that every time our hospital picked 2 or 3 official patterns that each specialty could wear, the uniform companies would quit making those patterns. the hospital eventually gave up.
  9. by   rnin02
    We do not have a "uniform" dress code for nurses and RT yet, but I think they have said that housekeeping will have one. I personally would hate it! I do not like wearing solid tops, I just feel like a look like a big blob of green/burgandy/whatever color I'm wearing coming down the hall. And as far as printed "cartoony" tops go, I recieve nothing but compliments from my patients and they frequently help to start converstations with the quieter patients. There maybe patients and families who don't like my tops, but I've never heard a word about it. I think introducing myself as a nurse, taking care of my patients in a professional manner, and wearing clean, unwrinkled scrubs shows that I am a professional, I don't need to match my coworkers to get the point across. Oh, and I also think housekeeping should be allowed to wear scrubs. They get exposed to many nasty disgusting things during the day, and scrubs are fairly easy to clean, durable, and worst case scenario not that expensive if they have to be thrown away!
  10. by   SCRN1
    Oh, get this! Not only are we going to be forced to wear a certain color (with no prints in that color allowed) and certain shoes, but the techs will still be able to wear whatever uniforms they want.:angryfire All others...nurses, RT, housekeeping, transport, etc have certain solid colored scrubs they will have to wear. Maybe we can sell all our "old" uniforms to the techs at a good price, lol.
  11. by   RN BSN 2009
    No, dont do it!!
  12. by   tgb3rn
    I for one would have to quit my job at the hospital and just do home health if they forced me to wear some of the uniforms you have described.
    What I am about to say next is NOT meant as an insult to anyone, just how I feel about it good or bad. I am a male nurse. It was hard enough for me to get past all of the sterotypes out there about male nurses. I have nothing against anyone that is gay, I just don't like for people to assume that I am, any yes they do. I work in a small, very rural area in Nebraska. There have been SEVERAL comments made to me and to other staff(even to my wife that works there as well) that Pt's just thought I was gay because I was a nurse--stupid? Yes but still they thought it. If I had to wear white, or any other light flowery girlie color---I'm out.
    Just my 2cents
    Tom
  13. by   BSNtobe2009
    Quote from tgb3rn
    I for one would have to quit my job at the hospital and just do home health if they forced me to wear some of the uniforms you have described.
    What I am about to say next is NOT meant as an insult to anyone, just how I feel about it good or bad. I am a male nurse. It was hard enough for me to get past all of the sterotypes out there about male nurses. I have nothing against anyone that is gay, I just don't like for people to assume that I am, any yes they do. I work in a small, very rural area in Nebraska. There have been SEVERAL comments made to me and to other staff(even to my wife that works there as well) that Pt's just thought I was gay because I was a nurse--stupid? Yes but still they thought it. If I had to wear white, or any other light flowery girlie color---I'm out.
    Just my 2cents
    Tom
    It is so, so sad that it is a stereotype of male nurses, and I wouldn't blame any guy for being upset about that. There are so few male nurses, and it's hard to figure out where it came from.

    I don't think that male nurses should be forced to wear "girlie" colors. THAT is unprofessional. A guy is a guy and they need to come up with a male-oriented uniform if they want to have "pink" as the primary color in a department.

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