'Unhealthy' nurses...bad examples? - page 3

I hope this post doesn't offend anyone,but I have noticed a lot of the nurses I know are overweight,smokers or both. Obviously people become nurses because they completed school,and are qualified to... Read More

  1. by   mercyteapot
    Quote from Josh L.Ac.
    I agree, but what is defined as professional competency [in any healthcare job] may include "healthy lifestyle", especially now with the obesity epidemic.


    On the other hand (following your lead), I think Clinton did a much better job than Bush Sr, although the later did work with increasing exercise awareness and was in great shape, while the former would jog to McDonalds.
    Who would get to dictate what comprised a healthy lifestyle? Would nurses who aren't overweight but are bulimic be considered incompetent? What about a thin nurse who is ill? Or people who control their weight by smoking or pills? Would nurses who are overweight because of a medical condition be ''exempt'' from the healthy weight requirement, or are we just going to go ahead and run afoul of the ADA while we're at? I don't really remember Bush Sr. promoting exercise, I must have repressed his presidency, too, even though I didn't hate him anywhere near as much as I hate his son. Not that it has anything to do with the price of tea in China, though, lol....
  2. by   rn/writer
    Much more important to me than a person's size is their level of internal peace and happiness. I'm overweight, but I'm also in an excellent marriage with cool kids and live a life that's pretty fulfilling. I have family and friends who enrich my days, a job I actually enjoy most of the time, a call to write that gives me purpose, and feeling of gratitude and satisfaction for the many blessings I have been given.

    Dh and I don't smoke, rarely drink, don't gamble or go to clubs. We spend quiet evenings at home over a nice dinner or we go out to eat. That's our vice. That and we don't exercise like we should.

    I would hope that when I am taking care of a patient, she can look past the extra pounds and see a happy heart and a contented spirit. That's one area where I can set a darn fine example.
  3. by   madwife2002
    Quote from rn/writer
    Much more important to me than a person's size is their level of internal peace and happiness. I'm overweight, but I'm also in an excellent marriage with cool kids and live a life that's pretty fulfilling. I have family and friends who enrich my days, a job I actually enjoy most of the time, a call to write that gives me purpose, and feeling of gratitude and satisfaction for the many blessings I have been given.

    Dh and I don't smoke, rarely drink, don't gamble or go to clubs. We spend quiet evenings at home over a nice dinner or we go out to eat. That's our vice. That and we don't exercise like we should.

    I would hope that when I am taking care of a patient, she can look past the extra pounds and see a happy heart and a contented spirit. That's one area where I can set a darn fine example.
    :yeahthat:
  4. by   Otessa
    I'm sure they know what they are doing-we are a well-educated society-choices are made every day by people in ALL jobs in this country and these same choices are being made in the community as well.
  5. by   fifi2323
    I'm sorry to have caused controversy..I was just curious since I will be going in to nursing and I am overweight,and I was wondering what peoples experiences were.I tend to be a worrier,and was concerned how it would be for me. Of course it is not right to discriminate,and being heavy or a smoker doesn't make a bad nurse or bad person. How you care for someone is most important. Everyone is human and are allowed their vices.I also think we are all here for the same reason and we shouldn't attack one another..just my two cents. Anyway, my post was meant an innocent question and I'm sorry if it was taken as anything else.
  6. by   bagladyrn
    On a lighter note - some of my patients seem downright positive about my extra weight - Those under about 10 lbs. tend to snuggle right in to the cushioning!
  7. by   Katnip
    Quote from cookielady,rn
    I've worked with nurses who can barely walk they've neglected themselves so long. I hate to see it, and I hate seeing them as patients because I know how embarassing it is for them.

    I personally take offense to the comment that a skinny nurse would be incompetent. One can have beauty and brains.

    I didn't see anyone who said skinny nurses are incompetent. It was stated that it would be better to have a competent overweight nurse rather than one who is not overweight but incompetent. Nowhere does it imply all non-overweight nurses are incompetent.
  8. by   leslie :-D
    my goodness, i don't understand the knee-jerk reactions myself.
    furthermore, i would never let someone judge me.
    of course, i cannot stop what one thinks.
    but that's on them, not me.
    no one said skinny nurses are competent or incompetent.
    same for overweight.
    i think true health comes from the inside out.
    if one thinks that overweight nurses are unhealthy r/t some residual childhood trauma, why not think that thin nurses are high strung and neurotic r/t unachieved goals of barbie-doll perfection.
    the entire concept is just silly.
    we are human, first and foremost.
    it is my experiences as a child, a teen, a mother, a friend, an eccentric renegade, that have enabled me to be the nurse i am today.
    it doesn't matter if and why i am over or underweight.
    just let me continue to do my job, aspiring to be my personal and professional best.
    what more could a patient want?

    leslie
  9. by   Pompom
    A personal pet peeve is nurses, respiratory therapists, doctors who reek of smoke ! Disgusting!
  10. by   MereSanity
    I don't smoke or drink. I am overweight but exercise 3 times a week. I also eat tons of veggies/fruits/whole grains, I am just fat. However, I know many "skinny" nurses that smoke or drink A LOT...are they better than me? How do you tell? I'm healthier than they are. Can we say that just because they are skinny they are healthy? Hmmmmm.
  11. by   Elisheva
    In life, there are:

    1. Accountants who don't balance their own checkbooks
    2. Preachers who commit adultery
    3. Beauticians who have bad hairdos
    4. Millionaires who drive 1968 orange pick-up trucks
    5. Chefs who eat fast food
    6. Mary Kay ladies who wear Clinque

    Humans are full of contradictions.
  12. by   middleageNP
    Nurses are people with the same problems as everyone else. As long as we are knowledged, caring and dedicated to our patients and our profession, aesthetic appearance is unimportant IMO....
  13. by   VivaLasViejas
    Quote from rn/writer
    Much more important to me than a person's size is their level of internal peace and happiness. I'm overweight, but I'm also in an excellent marriage with cool kids and live a life that's pretty fulfilling. I have family and friends who enrich my days, a job I actually enjoy most of the time, a call to write that gives me purpose, and feeling of gratitude and satisfaction for the many blessings I have been given.

    Dh and I don't smoke, rarely drink, don't gamble or go to clubs. We spend quiet evenings at home over a nice dinner or we go out to eat. That's our vice. That and we don't exercise like we should.

    I would hope that when I am taking care of a patient, she can look past the extra pounds and see a happy heart and a contented spirit. That's one area where I can set a darn fine example.
    I could have written this exact post........except I don't drink either:wink2:

    What Miranda said is where it's at as far as I'm concerned, and if living a life that's useful, fulfilling, and contented isn't the definition of healthy, I don't know what is!

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