Unexpierienced New Nurses

  1. What are the your thoughts of new graduating RN's that have never worked as a CNA, LPN, or any other area of health care? Do they give proper or adequate patient care?
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  2. 8 Comments

  3. by   purplemania
    Depends on the individual. Most grads focus on tasks, which are easily learned. The harder, more subtle, learning takes place when the grad has to identify and solve (or preven) problems which interacting with patient, family and other disciplines. I have seen new grads give great care while others freeze. I have also seen seasoned nurses give lousy or great care.
  4. by   *PICURN*
    I worked as a CNA type position during school and I still feel retarded as a new grad

    Yeah the experience helped somewhat, I got the BP, bath, linen change down....but still the RN role is so different I feel like I am in the same boat as the other new grads
  5. by   UM Review RN
    Quote from chrda
    What are the your thoughts of new graduating RN's that have never worked as a CNA, LPN, or any other area of health care? Do they give proper or adequate patient care?
    Ours do, without exception. We joke that it's because we only hire the best, but I frankly can't imagine a new grad NOT wanting to do their best, can you?
  6. by   sharann
    If they can't take vital sign or give a bed bath then they wouldn't have made it out of clinicals. There is always a learning curve. Many generic MSN students have never been a nurse or aide and can still call themselves NP's after certification. The most important thing is for a nurse(new or not) to give the best care and to learn fast!
  7. by   HappyNurse2005
    Well, I'm going to be a new grad RN soon, and I've never been a CNA, LPN, or any type of health care experience. Considering the vast differences in the job requirements, I don't suppose being a CNA would have much impact on a new grad RN"s practice. Now, if the new grad RN had been an LPN, sure, that would benefit him/her, having had that nursing practice before.
    Either way, I'm going to try my hardest, and be the best RN I can, and I doubt that my not being a CNA will affect that.
    I also agree with below poster. It is all individual.

    Depends on the individual. Most grads focus on tasks, which are easily learned. The harder, more subtle, learning takes place when the grad has to identify and solve (or preven) problems which interacting with patient, family and other disciplines.
  8. by   fooRN
    I was a CNA and a nurse tech during the time I have been in nursing school. I feel that it had huge benefits for me. Even though I wasn't practicing the same skills RNs do, I was able to build communication skills, see how the unit works, and observe the RNs and learn a lot from them. I felt much more comfortable in my clinicals after I worked as a CNA and I think that it will also help you appreciate all the hard work the CNAs do when you are the RN delgating to them someday. Overall, I feel that getting the experience in the hospital before you graduate is very beneficial, and I would definitely recommend it.
  9. by   grimmy
    Quote from rninmay2005
    well, i'm going to be a new grad rn soon, and i've never been a cna, lpn, or any type of health care experience. considering the vast differences in the job requirements, i don't suppose being a cna would have much impact on a new grad rn"s practice. now, if the new grad rn had been an lpn, sure, that would benefit him/her, having had that nursing practice before.
    either way, i'm going to try my hardest, and be the best rn i can, and i doubt that my not being a cna will affect that.
    i also agree with below poster. it is all individual.

    [font=book antiqua]i think that anytime a nursing student actively works at patient care their graduate nursing experience will be improved. i was a pct for the last 2 years of nursing school, and it really helped me through nursing school (i picked up on a lot of things my fellow non-working students did not), and my graduate nurse experience has been greatly enhanced because i know how to effectively relate to the pcts i supervise. i know what their job is, how to do it, and how to teach it. i also am keenly aware of what tasks i can safely delegate to them. another thing that being a pct showed me was what type of nursing i was suited to...i was a float pct in a small community hospital, and i went through just about every dept in that hospital. that was an education in itself. working with nurses who knew i was a nursing student, they called me in to see interesting cases, allowed me to make assessments and ask questions...it was super. not always easy, by any means, but really educational.
  10. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Quote from chrda
    What are the your thoughts of new graduating RN's that have never worked as a CNA, LPN, or any other area of health care? Do they give proper or adequate patient care?
    The answer is "yes". I did as a new RN grad w/out prior LPN/CNA experience. ALL new nurses need orientation anyhow, no one graduates independently capable and ready to "take on the unit".

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