UGH dumb people - page 2

Sorry, I just want to vent. The other day at my daughters school, her best friend had a seizure, I went to help (It is a small private school, where more freedom is allowed to parents). The school... Read More

  1. by   ebear
    P RN !
    GREAT JOB!!!!!:spin:
  2. by   jojotoo
    Quote from P_RN
    At headstart I had a little boy who was reported to have "seizures" and they told me to let him squat as that was what his mom told them to do.

    It didn't sound right to me but after seeing him have a "seizure" I realized he had tetralogy of fallot not epilepsy. He'd been there 2 years and no one had questioned it. One of my prouder moments was when my dx was confirmed and he had his repair. He was a fragile child and now a fragile adult...but with a college degree no less.

    Can you give more explanation please. I'm sure this is something that I should know, but I'm missing it. Thanks.
  3. by   jojotoo
    Quote from santhony44
    Nothing short of meds will stop a seizure in progress.


    ???? I've seen many seizures stop without meds.
  4. by   sharona97
    Was this even reported to the school, the history of this poor girl, and if so....the nurse (commen sense people). I'd have a t alk with that nurse whoever or whatever her titles are.
  5. by   jmgrn65
    It amazing how some people passed NCLEX!
  6. by   canoehead
    Quote from jojotoo
    Can you give more explanation please. I'm sure this is something that I should know, but I'm missing it. Thanks.

    Tetrology of Fallot is a congenital heart condition, and predisposes kids to CHF, fluid on the lungs. They decrease their circulating blood volume by squatting- decreasing venous return from the legs. Their heart can then "catch up" with less blood to pump around, and clear the pulmonary fluid, helping the patient feel better. Any increase in cardiac demand can overshoot the heart's ability to keep up- eating, walking, etc.
  7. by   santhony44
    Quote from jojotoo
    ???? I've seen many seizures stop without meds.

    I wasn't making myself clear. The seizure will stop on its own without meds most of the time. What I meant was, you can't do anything to the person to cause it to stop other than medicate. Walking someone, throwing cold water on them, etc. won't stop a seizure.
  8. by   Kidrn911
    Thank you all very much for your responses.

    The girl has a known history of multiple seizures, the school knows this, so does the nurse.

    As for her walking, this is a 12 year old girl, she was leaning back on my adult friend (who is not medical) and basically being forced to walk, her legs were being kicked out to move, as she was trying to collapse (I hope this makes sense). The school RN was walking along side her

    She did stop seizing on her own. The school nurse said she is supposed to take medicine orally when she starts to seize. That is what is written in the card. The problem was that day, they didn't have her medicine, I was actually thankful, because I could see that as an aspiration issue. I wouldn't have been comfortable giving PO to a actively seizng person.

    I know this girl quite well, my daughter is her best friend and I also pick up her experimental seizure drugs at my place of employment so her parents don't have to drive over an hour to get there. She is on a clinical trial because they have not been able to find any seizure meds that work that don't completely snow her.
    Last edit by Kidrn911 on Sep 24, '07
  9. by   bigsyis
    I never heard of such a thing. How in the world in a true tonic-clonic seizure was it possible for her to walk in the first place? The school RN must be one BIG woman to be able to support that child and walk her while she is having a seizure. BUT-you did say that somebody was nearly carrying her, right? That is because it isn't possible for someone having a true seizure like that to ambulate. Pseudoseizures are another thing, but then, that is another thread.
  10. by   SuesquatchRN
    Quote from P_RN
    At headstart I had a little boy who was reported to have "seizures" and they told me to let him squat as that was what his mom told them to do.

    It didn't sound right to me but after seeing him have a "seizure" I realized he had tetralogy of fallot not epilepsy. He'd been there 2 years and no one had questioned it. One of my prouder moments was when my dx was confirmed and he had his repair. He was a fragile child and now a fragile adult...but with a college degree no less.
    That must have been sweet!
  11. by   RN1989
    Aahhh - yet another person who deserves their very own yellow sign reading "I'm stoooopid"! I am so tempted to print some up and keep them in my car as emergency equipment!
  12. by   Kidrn911
    Quote from bigsyis
    I never heard of such a thing. How in the world in a true tonic-clonic seizure was it possible for her to walk in the first place? The school RN must be one BIG woman to be able to support that child and walk her while she is having a seizure. BUT-you did say that somebody was nearly carrying her, right? That is because it isn't possible for someone having a true seizure like that to ambulate. Pseudoseizures are another thing, but then, that is another thread.
    This was no pseudo seizure
  13. by   MrsMommaRN
    How horrible is that situation. Is that how the seizures are dealt with at home walk em off.
    Never ever have I heard or been taught to ambulate anyone any age while seizing.
    I hope you are able to get some info to the mom and the family so they can prevent future harm to this poor girl.

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