two full time jobs for a new grad - page 3

Has anyone ever worked 2 fulltime jobs or is it possible? what are your experiences and how long did you last if ever you did work 2 full time jobs?... Read More

  1. by   PANurseRN1
    Quote from shyinla2004
    Thanks for the responses. I appreciate it. Well, the reason I asked the question is because I was sponsored by one hospital but the thing is they dont have a new grad program. I am really interested in having a good foundation to start my career by getting proper training. The first hospital is only a 160 bed hospital with only an urgent care dept instead of an ER. Then the one I am thinking of working has a new grad program in ER. plus they have very good benefits, so it is very attractive. it is just too difficult to pass on an opportunity for training with excellent benefits. Its not actually the per hour that i am concerned but the training and the other benefits that go with the job. So I am soliciting opinions to get an idea of what experinced nurses have to say. Thanks for taking the time te respond....
    Oh my God, ED no less. As someone who works prn in the ED, in addition to a regular job, don't even think about it. If you have to bail on the hospital that sponsored you and pay them back, do that and take the job at the hospital that has a new grad program.

    Absolutely, positive NO WAY!
  2. by   subee
    Quote from shyinla2004
    hey guys,
    thanks for shelling out your thoughts. I have no intention of not fulfilling my obligations to my sponsoring hospital, the thought just crossed my mind that since i will be only working 3 12-hour days a week, I still have 4 days off. I felt it might be good to take a second job especially one that offers training and good benefits. But I guess as a new grad, a lot has to be learned in one hospital alone.

    sorry, I misunderstood. If you're destined to be a great nurse, you're going to be incredibly stressed out the first year because there's so much to look up when you get home. Most people find 12's taxing enough. Give yourself a year or so to get on you feet and then decide if you can handle an extra shift. Part of the job is learning how to take care of yourself with you time off - get rest, exercise and eat well because you have to be in great physical shape just to come out without back or neck injury.
  3. by   kate1114
    Quote from shyinla2004
    hey guys,
    thanks for shelling out your thoughts. I have no intention of not fulfilling my obligations to my sponsoring hospital, the thought just crossed my mind that since i will be only working 3 12-hour days a week, I still have 4 days off. I felt it might be good to take a second job especially one that offers training and good benefits. But I guess as a new grad, a lot has to be learned in one hospital alone.
    I agree with most of the posters here. You will have so much to adjust to that you really should spend about the first year of employment adjusting to practicing as a nurse. During this time you will be studying for and taking (and passing!) the NCLEX, obtaining training, getting used to working your shifts, etc.

    I have worked with several people who have worked two full time jobs, and their performance always scared me. Not because they were bad nurses. On the contrary, they were wonderful at their jobs. But overwork, undersleep, and stress can really predispose you to serious problems like medication errors or falling asleep on the job.

    I had a dear friend who was working at multiple hospitals trying to make ends meet. She had a baby daughter she almost never saw in order to pay for her nice new house and luxury car. It got to the point where I hated working with her because I always had to pick up the slack when she went on "break" to go sleep. She eventually crashed and burned, had to give up the car (not sure about the house), and eventually went from a NICU job to a clinic job because of stress.

    Please think carefully about this, and take the first year to really work on positioning yourself for the ER. Take the time to learn different areas of the hospital so you can be the best nurse in the running for the ER job in the future.
  4. by   jjjoy
    "only three 12-hour shifts" - doesn't sound like much, huh? "And four days off" - what just sit there at home for most of the week? Working regular office hours makes taking a second full-time job next to impossible just due to scheduling even if one wanted to. But the scheduling of 12-hour shifts does make it look tempting to take two full-time jobs. A number of people do it, too - though I'd imagine most (not all!) people's health, quality of life and work performance suffer in the long run.

    The chances are that you won't be working your three shifts back to back or on the same days week to week. Trying to schedule between the two facilities without overlap would be challenging. You might end up having to schedule 8 days straight sometimes to make it work!

    Even if you could manage to work out a schedule between the two jobs, you'd probably want more than just one day off a week. Many people write off the first day off after several back to back shifts because they're recouperating. When working 12 hour shifts back to back you've barely got time to eat and sleep before you're back at work again. Coming off six straight 12 hour shifts (on your feet the entire time!) with just one day off before you start it all over again, when would you rest, mentally review your work performance and bone up on your nursing knowledge, do laundry, buy groceries, talk to friends and family...?

    Some people can do it, want to do it, have to do it... they're not you and you're not them. You've asked what other people think about the idea and you're getting lots of opinions on it. Ultimately, it's your choice. Let us know what you decide!
    Last edit by jjjoy on Nov 30, '06
  5. by   SmilingBluEyes
    There is reason there are "only three 12 hour shifts" in a week for an FTE. You need those other days to recup and relax. Nursing is so very stressful, especially that first year. If you can make do without the extra money a 2nd job would bring, you would be best off to keep it to just ONE job the first year. You can always pick up another per diem or part time position later on, if you need or want to . Just trust me, that first year will be tough enough without the stress of two full-time jobs on your back.

    Also be aware, some places require on-call shifts. So, in a given week, you may be scheduled 3 12's but required to sign up to be on call for a 4th. And what will you do, if your job schedules conflict?

    Just some things to think about. Good luck and take care.
  6. by   shyinla2004
    Its great to have a lot of different points of view. I am getting a better picture of what I may get myself into. Thanks for your advice. Makes me rethink things. :icon_biggrin:
  7. by   user9876
    i agree with everyone else, that it isn't a good idea, but i can't help but think of being a new grad, working at base pay, and between the 2 jobs, starting off making over 80-90k a year. that WOULD be awesome.....
  8. by   jjjoy
    ... and the very real possibility of quickly burning out, quitting/losing both jobs, and being physically and mentally wiped out with no income!!!!

    More realistically, get settled in a first job. Once you're comfortable there, if you feel you can take on more, seek out part time/per diem/agency work.
  9. by   rn/writer
    If you work two full-time jobs, you won't have time to come here to allnurses.com. How scary is that! :selfbonk: :smackingf :uhoh21:
  10. by   shyinla2004
    Hey,
    What if I am already settled after a year, and feel I have gained enough confidence in the my area of work (med/surg), if i decide I do for a part-timr job, which would you consider: a home health care job or a per diem at a hospital?
  11. by   mom23RN
    I'm wondering if it's possible for your to get the job at the other hospital and just "pay back" the hospital that sponsored you... or talk to the other hospital about "buying you out" of your other obligation. Sometimes they will. Personally, from the sounds of it I would go for the other hospital as you will get so much more experience if you're looking for ER. :spin: Urgent care and ER are really 2 different worlds.

    Good luck!
  12. by   SmilingBluEyes
    I recommend perdiem. That way, you can tell them when you are available or not. Also, there is often a differential that comes with PD positions. Mine is 15%. Significant, if you break it down!
  13. by   santhony44
    Quote from SmilingBluEyes
    I recommend perdiem. That way, you can tell them when you are available or not. Also, there is often a differential that comes with PD positions. Mine is 15%. Significant, if you break it down!
    :yeahthat:

    You will want to be able to set your own schedule for the second job. If you want to take a week or weekend off, etc. then it's not a problem. With per diem, you work when you want and don't work if you don't wish to.

close