Treating the Muslim patient - page 7

by Inspired By Silence

26,347 Unique Views | 65 Comments

I'm still in my nursing prerequsite phase of college, but I have some concerns about treating Muslim patients and would like some clarification. I'm very eager to make sure my patients are comfortable with the level of care I... Read More


  1. 1
    Quote from Stephanita
    holy ignorance, batman!

    it has nothing to do with their views of gender roles, it is about their views of modesty.
    I'm not sure who that comment was aimed at, but there are certainly two issues here, modesty and the role of women in islamic society.Their role can vary for cultural reasons, for example, Iranian women are clearly property, while some more westernized cultures allow womem to work and go out alone.
    As I said, the city where I am is predominately muslim, and for that reason, the more traditional cultures remain. Chaperones are necessary even if going to the grocery store, they need to have a male relative with them at all times, and cannot speak directly to a male who is not a relative, (even if they are a nurse, doctor, or intepreter, which causes a lot of problems).

    Can I suggest two things for those who do not work in a muslim culture?
    Firstly,watch a movie called "Not without my daughter", its on youtube, and tells the story of an American woman who married an Iranian. They went Iran to se his relatives, and her role changed drastically, not even the US Embassy could over-ride the fact that she was his property.
    Second, find some books by a guy called Patrick Soodheko, (sp?), he is a convert from islam to Christianity, and describes from an 'insider' perspective what living under islam is like.
    Fiona59 likes this.
  2. 2
    There are plenty of other books too.
    'In the Land of Invisible Women' by Qanta Ahmed.
    'Nine Parts of Desire' by Geraldine Brooks
    'The Bread of Angels' by Stephanie Saldana
    'Tea with Hezbollah' by Carl Medearis and Ted Dekker

    You can find negative and positive in any culture. There is plenty to critique in American culture too.
    Fiona59 and sharpeimom like this.
  3. 0
    Check out "Daughters of Another Path" and "Easily Understanding Islam".
  4. 0
    Quote from giveface
    I think the complexities that have come up with providing culturally competent care are really just an outgrowth of this hole switch to a "customer focused" health care paradigm. The hole thing is nonsense really! I think wherever possible guide your actions with respect. But having said that, we are highly trained health care professionals providing life or death skills to patients; we are not diplomats.
    When would your actions ever not be guided with respect?

    I've dealt with violently psychotic individuals, and we did what we had to do, but were never disrespectful. Being brusque & leaping into action in an emergency is one thing, disrespect is another.

    And why is a "customer focus" wrong? People come in; sick, scared, angry, exhausted. We need to do the best we can to provide them the best experience that we can (yes, I do hands on care). It's not a hotel, not a spa, but why wouldn't we want to create as positive experience. Don't forget, health care is competitive, and in most cases people have choices in where to go for their care. If you want your institution to stay open, you want to continue to be employed in a facility you can be proud of, you need to treat your customers as adults who participate in their care, not passive patients.
  5. 3
    Quote from MrChicagoRN
    When would your actions ever not be guided with respect?

    I've dealt with violently psychotic individuals, and we did what we had to do, but were never disrespectful. Being brusque & leaping into action in an emergency is one thing, disrespect is another.

    And why is a "customer focus" wrong? People come in; sick, scared, angry, exhausted. We need to do the best we can to provide them the best experience that we can (yes, I do hands on care). It's not a hotel, not a spa, but why wouldn't we want to create as positive experience. Don't forget, health care is competitive, and in most cases people have choices in where to go for their care. If you want your institution to stay open, you want to continue to be employed in a facility you can be proud of, you need to treat your customers as adults who participate in their care, not passive patients.

    Your final paragraph summed up what is wrong with healthcare. Americans see it as a moneymaking business.

    Canadians and Europeans see it as a basic human right.
    VanLpn, talaxandra, and wooh like this.
  6. 0
    "Your final paragraph summed up what is wrong with healthcare. Americans see it as a moneymaking business. Canadians and Europeans see it as a basic human right."

    Very true. But what's happening in health care is part of a much bigger picture. Corporate culture, the "for profit" culture, now dominates. It's always been there. America is a capitalist country. But big business now has taken over all aspects of our lives. It was President Eisenhower who first used the phrase, the "Military Industrial Complex." We now have the "Medical Industrial Complex," the "Media Industrial Complex," the "Banking Industrial Complex," the "Educational Industrial Complex," etc. Use a flow chart. You can trace every profit making venture in all these areas back to a very few major corporations who control everything. Follow the money.


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