Treated like gold

  1. I read this BB today and shake my head. I recently transferred from ER to ICU, hoping for tolerance of a new RN. They treat me like gold. They offer help 3-4 x's a day. It's infectious. I now find time to ask if I can help them. We are an 8 pt pod. We take a maximum of 3 pts each. When I got my first new pt, the other 2 nurses came in the room and tag-teamed the pt with me until it was done. I wish I could give you the recipe to their success. I know there has to be units like this out there. Anyone want to share?
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  2. 10 Comments

  3. by   live4today
    Hi midwest RN....don't know what city/state of the midwest you are in, but I'm looking for a nursing job, so if your hospital is hiring.....I would sure like to apply! :kiss
  4. by   BadBird
    I work in a few different ICU's as agency, we always jump on the new patients, with everyone in there it takes no time at all to get the patient settled. ICU nurses seem to have figured out that if you help you will be helped. It is contagious thank goodness for something positive.
  5. by   Orca
    I advise hanging onto that job for as long as the supportive atmosphere exists. For every unit like yours, there are probably 50 in which administration cuts staff to the bare bones, fraying nerves and cutting down on the time staff have to support one another (and care for patients). It is good to hear that there are a few places out there that have a clue. Now, if they could just convince the rest of the administrators out there that cost means more than just the bottom line.

    I saw a recent estimate that every RN lost by a hospital represents a loss of $40,000 to the facility. Since this cost never directly shows up in the budget, administrators instead congratulate themselves for all the money they have saved by leaving the position vacant.
  6. by   midwestRN
    Oklahoma. And like all hospitals, they're hiring. But like all Oklahoma hospitals, they pay is poor, the benefits are bad, and they have trouble keeping staff. You would probably laugh at my paycheck. But, I don't dread going to work.
  7. by   live4today
    Originally posted by midwestRN
    Oklahoma. And like all hospitals, they're hiring. But like all Oklahoma hospitals, they pay is poor, the benefits are bad, and they have trouble keeping staff. You would probably laugh at my paycheck. But, I don't dread going to work.
    I would never laugh at a paycheck that brings a nurse happiness due to where he/she collects that paycheck. So, if the place you work at brings you happiness, then I don't blame you for smiling everytime you earn a paycheck signed by them. Money isn't suppose to RULE or MASTER us....it is there to work FOR us. Keep on doing what you are doing, and working where you work as long as you can go home with an easy heart, peace of mind for having done a great job with the support of a great staff beside you, and a smile on your face after work. Those are benefits that all the money in the world cannot buy. :kiss
  8. by   Brownms46
    I have posted about an ICU/CCU I did contracts in a while back in S. C.. Great bunch of people....and I ended up doing 3 or 4 contract there...until they realized I was never going to come on full-time perm.. They were very much like a family...and I had much respect, and still do for all of those who worked in the unit. The fact that I signed at least 3 13 weeks contracts there...should say it all!

    The ICU was a 7 pt bed area...and the CCU was 6 I think. The units were seperated by a wall...and it didn't matter where the nurse was that needed help. If someone was free in either area...they came to help! We did the baths each nite the same way. We started on one end...and continued until everyone was done. If someone who was helping had to run back to their pt...then someone else jumped in. I love the tag teaming...that was the norm when we got admits!

    I really miss those people...and if it wasn't in S. C....I would probably go back. But I'm tired of the heat and humidity....and looking forward to CA..by the beginning of next year. Glad to hear that you have found a good place to work MidwestRN Money doesn't always say it all....
    Last edit by Brownms46 on Aug 30, '02
  9. by   nrsjo
    I work in a large ICU in a very busy teaching hospital, which serves a large indigent population. My hospital has the same problems every other hospital has. I am not well paid, the benefits are fair at best.

    However, what makes my job tolerable is my co-workers. We get along well. We work as a team. People help each other. They help you if you're busy. They never just let someone sink. You frequently hear people say that we are a family. In addition, I have a nurse manager that truely cares about her nurses. She accomodates people as best she can. She helps out on the unit, she knows the patients, she knows her staff. She's up to date in her skills and her practice. And she goes to bat for us when she needs to. In exchange, we do anything we can to make her life as a manager easier. She is a rare one in the world of nurse managers.

    That's what helps makes my job tolerable.
  10. by   fedupnurse
    If it wasn't for most of my colleagues I would have bailed from my facility years ago. I don't have an issue with probably 80% of my colleagues. The 20% of my colleagues not included are the ones who are incompetent and never should have made it through orientation. Very nice people but totally unsafe. I have serious issues with management and administration. I work in a large, poorly laid out, high acutiy ICU/CCU. It is set up like a med surg floor because that is what it used to be. The suits have set up other floors, like Tele, so that the staff cannot work together. All of this was by design-divide and conquer. I am glad to hear that isn't the mentality of your colleagues. ICU tends to have a team attitude. We have recently had a couple of people leave and take pay cuts to work for a better management team in another facility. Money doesn't matter if you are miserable.
  11. by   Brownms46
    Originally posted by fedupnurse
    . I work in a large, poorly laid out, high acutiy ICU/CCU. It is set up like a med surg floor because that is what it used to be. The suits have set up other floors, like Tele, so that the staff cannot work together.
    I can't even get a mental picture of how you could safely observe your pts in this kind of setting!!!! Wow..hard to believe someone could have thought that "was"...a good idea!! Blows my mind...just to think about it....
  12. by   christianRN
    Midwest, I work at a 10-bed ICU, and I have been THRILLED with the teamwork. It's unbelievable. Thanks for starting such a positive thread!! Glad to hear from someone else who is blessed in their work setting.

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