Travel Nursing from Mexico

  1. Does anyone know of any nurses who are traveling to the US but living in Mexico? (Or any other low cost of living country)

    Here is my thinking on this. One could live in a country with a low cost of living and travel and work in the US, or where ever, for 3 to 6 months a year and live on the prodeeds the rest of the year.

    Is anyone doing this?

    I consider Mexico because the weather is warm, the people are friendly and its close proximity to the US.

    I would be interested in hearing your thoughts on this.
    •  
  2. 15 Comments

  3. by   rollingstone
    Nope, haven't heard of anyone doing this. Interesting idea though.
  4. by   zacarias
    Mantibob,

    I've considered this. It's a great idea, do you speak Spanish? I was thinking in a few years to live in Mexico like Matamoros area, and work in the Rio Grande Valley as a nurse. Or I'd travel nurse six months out of the year, and live in Mexico six months out of the year teaching English.
    There are several different ways of doing this. It's exciting. If you just wanted to live in Mexico without working there for six months at a time, you would only need a tourist visa (FMT) and just ask for the full 180-day limit when you go down there.
  5. by   suzanne4
    There are actually quite a few flight attendents that live in BKK and they call it their home. They commute to the US for their international flights.

    One thing to keep in mind with Mexico. What happens if the border gets closed down when you have a shift to get to? I have had it happen to me.
    Used to have restaurant down there and would commute back and forth. Something to think about....................

  6. by   NurseHardee
    The Border has more obstacles than benefits when considering living on the Mexican side. A better bet, is just to be a travel nurse in the US and having a home further into the country to retreat to between assignments. There you might be able to do some volunteer stuff with a chuirch or community group of some sort. Pay for Mexcian nurxses is horrible, so forget about making much of a living there doing it. And the paper work alone is a total turn off from even trying.

    Nurse Hardee
  7. by   Tweety
    I worked with a nurse who lived in the Ukraine for six months during the summer and worked in the US as an agency nurse for six months. He was able to spread his six months of US dollars over the remainder of the year in the Ukraine, because of their low cost of living. He did however, work every day he possibly could, and during the busy season in Florida he worked seven 12 hour shifts a week for long stretches at a time.
  8. by   zacarias
    Quote from NurseHardee
    The Border has more obstacles than benefits when considering living on the Mexican side. A better bet, is just to be a travel nurse in the US and having a home further into the country to retreat to between assignments.
    The second is a good idea although the border thing doesn't bother me too much. Just a note, approx. 35,000 commute from Tijuana to San Diego everyday for work.
  9. by   Mantibob
    Thanks for the info Zacarias. I was thinking south of Tijuana on the coast just 30 to 40 minutes from san diego. There are hospitals in Chula Vista, ten minutes from the boarder, 20 minutes from the area I am considering. You can own a house over looking the sea in a private gated community with golf course and it costs a total of $35,000. NOT TOO SHABY!!!



    Quote from zacarias
    Mantibob,

    I've considered this. It's a great idea, do you speak Spanish? I was thinking in a few years to live in Mexico like Matamoros area, and work in the Rio Grande Valley as a nurse. Or I'd travel nurse six months out of the year, and live in Mexico six months out of the year teaching English.
    There are several different ways of doing this. It's exciting. If you just wanted to live in Mexico without working there for six months at a time, you would only need a tourist visa (FMT) and just ask for the full 180-day limit when you go down there.
  10. by   Mantibob
    Sorry, Where is BKK?


    Quote from suzanne4
    There are actually quite a few flight attendents that live in BKK and they call it their home. They commute to the US for their international flights.

    One thing to keep in mind with Mexico. What happens if the border gets closed down when you have a shift to get to? I have had it happen to me.
    Used to have restaurant down there and would commute back and forth. Something to think about....................

  11. by   Mantibob
    Good Point. I had not thought about the border being closed.



    Quote from NurseHardee
    The Border has more obstacles than benefits when considering living on the Mexican side. A better bet, is just to be a travel nurse in the US and having a home further into the country to retreat to between assignments. There you might be able to do some volunteer stuff with a chuirch or community group of some sort. Pay for Mexcian nurxses is horrible, so forget about making much of a living there doing it. And the paper work alone is a total turn off from even trying.

    Nurse Hardee
  12. by   Mantibob
    Interesting!! I wonder what the Ukraine is like??



    Quote from 3rdShiftGuy
    I worked with a nurse who lived in the Ukraine for six months during the summer and worked in the US as an agency nurse for six months. He was able to spread his six months of US dollars over the remainder of the year in the Ukraine, because of their low cost of living. He did however, work every day he possibly could, and during the busy season in Florida he worked seven 12 hour shifts a week for long stretches at a time.
  13. by   Mantibob
    WOW!!! 35,000!!



    Quote from zacarias
    The second is a good idea although the border thing doesn't bother me too much. Just a note, approx. 35,000 commute from Tijuana to San Diego everyday for work.
  14. by   NurseHardee
    Got to tell you, Zack... you got more stamina than I do. Border crossings are never pleasant, and who needs that as a more or less daily thing? It's just too damn ugly to want to do, even if it were to only work two back-to-back double shifts, maybe then????? But that's horrible too! NH

    Quote from zacarias
    The second is a good idea although the border thing doesn't bother me too much. Just a note, approx. 35,000 commute from Tijuana to San Diego everyday for work.

close