transfer techniques

  1. 0
    Hi everyone:
    I have a question about transfer techniques. I'm doing a geriatric rotation (only 2 weeks to go... can't wait) and I've noticed that all the CGAs on the floor transfer differently than we were taught. Specifically, we were taught not to lift from under the resident's arms because of the risk of brachial plexus injuries.... however, that is how ALL the personnel lift in this facility.
    We were taught a two person maximal assist where, while facing the patient, you would lift from under the thigh (right hand under the thigh from the inside and left hand on gait belt for stability), then both people would straighten up, rotate, and place the resident on the wheelchair, gerichair, whatever. Is this very different from actual transfer techniques used in facilities? I know very little about this, but I don't want to assist a CGA in an unsafe transfer that could lead to nerve injuries.
    Just an aside: this facility also has no gait belts. Brought it up to the charge nurse... she suggested that if we'd like to use one, to purchase one at the medical supply store and wear it around our own waists and use it for each resident as we need it. Umm, what? Infection control, anyone? Why don't we just take the same towels or bedsheets and pass them from resident to resident. So maybe its just the facility?
    Anyway, any insight about transfer techniques in the real world would be greatly appreciated.
    Take care all.
    God bless America
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  5. 0
    Originally posted by MsPurp
    Hi everyone:
    I have a question about transfer techniques. I'm doing a geriatric rotation (only 2 weeks to go... can't wait) and I've noticed that all the CGAs on the floor transfer differently than we were taught. Specifically, we were taught not to lift from under the resident's arms because of the risk of brachial plexus injuries.... however, that is how ALL the personnel lift in this facility.
    We were taught a two person maximal assist where, while facing the patient, you would lift from under the thigh (right hand under the thigh from the inside and left hand on gait belt for stability), then both people would straighten up, rotate, and place the resident on the wheelchair, gerichair, whatever. Is this very different from actual transfer techniques used in facilities? I know very little about this, but I don't want to assist a CGA in an unsafe transfer that could lead to nerve injuries.
    Just an aside: this facility also has no gait belts. Brought it up to the charge nurse... she suggested that if we'd like to use one, to purchase one at the medical supply store and wear it around our own waists and use it for each resident as we need it. Umm, what? Infection control, anyone? Why don't we just take the same towels or bedsheets and pass them from resident to resident. So maybe its just the facility?
    Anyway, any insight about transfer techniques in the real world would be greatly appreciated.
    Take care all.
    God bless America
    Welcome to the real world of nursing.What are your chances of having another person to help you lift????? 0-zilch. If the patient has one good leg or two they can assist you,(pivot), If the patient is small you may be able to cradle lift.(remember, lift with your legs, not your back). Some facilities have a "lift" which one person can operate.I don't like the idea of the "one" gait belt, but you might want a back support for yourself, and maybe one bright day you might have help.
  6. 0
    http://www.rohcg.on.ca/mobile/transfer/

    This site is a good one.

    Just reading your question made my L5-S1 hurt! And I did ortho for 22 years!

    I had my own gait belt and used it patient to patient as long as a clean gown or sheet was between the belt and the patient. If you don't have a belt get a sheet and roll it into a belt and use that. I'm afraid those lift belts aren't what they were supposed to be. They work well at nipping your waist but not much more.

    Since you are a student perhaps you will have help?

    This site is a powerpoint type presentation but if you look at the bottom there is a dropdown that you can choose which slide to view.
  7. 0
    Are you guys for real? Ever heard of a "no lift" policy? FYI, that is when ANY and ALL residents/patients who are non/partial weight bearing are moved with hoists/slide sheets/gait belts etc. Ask your administrators - which would be more expensive - to supply staff with appropriate equipment, or to provide workers compensation to a person with a chronic back pain problem requiring physio/surgery/medication. If you all refuse to do it, something will be done.
  8. 0
    Sheesh. That was a negative response. It was a valid question. FYI: my patient is non weight-bearing. Cannot help at all. I would guesstimate her weight at about 180 lbs. I am not bucket lifting her.
    As far as the real world of nursing goes.... if you choose to jeopardize your health and risk a debilitating back injury, lift by yourself. I will stand at the nurses's station and not move until I get help.
  9. 0
    Another abbreviation I don't know: FYI

    About lifting, of course it's always better two work in pairs, but...... sometimes you're on your own! Before you hurt your patient or yourself, wait and call for help.

    I've been nursing now for more then 20 years (oh my God!), I am small (1.56 m. and weigh 45 kg), know a lot of tricks, have to teach my students how to lift, but my first is always: don't lift a patient alone, when you are not sure how much he will be able to help you.

    Don't you learn technics like kinästhetics or Bobath?
    They've got a few very nice and easy tricks.

    Take care of your back, you've only got one!! Renee
  10. 0
    FYI= for your information
  11. 0
    ty (is that right for thank you?)
  12. 0
    No Lift? hahahahahahahahahahahahaha

    That might cost money! Sheesh we could hardly find a thermometer much less have enough hoyers and smooth movers!

    The only no lift places around here were the private ecf s that cost the BIG MONEY per day. Around here nurses are a "dime a dozen" and a PARADIGM will get you 2 dozen.

    So far they've paid a LOT out on me and they're just getting started. But do they care. NOPE
  13. 0
    Call it an investment in staff safety, patient safety too, continuity of care, COST savings, whatever. A nurse is too expensive to use as a fork-lift! A hoist does the job more effectively, efficiently, and is easier and cheaper to repair.
    Outline the cost, not just in human terms of pain, etc. but spell out the financial cost of a nurses' back injury. Sick pay, cover during their sick time, possible lawsuits for employer negligence, workers compensation, (or the insurance premiums to cover those risks) the cost of induction of a replacement if the nurse cannot return to her post, (UK average figure for recruiting an RN is £ 5000+) The financial case exists, it needs making loud and often
    Don


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