To early for grad school?

  1. Hi I graduated with my BSN 2001. I am know pursing my master's degree. Some people have told me that I should work for a couple of years before returning to school. But I say why wait? I am 27 years old I do not have any children as of yet and feel I should continue with school while I am able. I am just curious to read other thoughts about this?

    Thanks..
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  2. 12 Comments

  3. by   ptnurse
    Sounds like you have a plan that you are happy with, go for it. Oh, and good luck with your studies. What area of study are you pursuing?
  4. by   Stargazer
    Gracey, by pursuing do you mean that you are actually in grad school or just researching it? Because that'll affect my answer.
  5. by   Gracey
    Hi I am in grad school now finishing off my first semester of 6 units. I am working full time and going to school part time. My goal is to become a geriatric CNS. Thanks for sharing your thoughts.
  6. by   LLH
    I too graduated in 2001 with my BSN and am now finishing my first semester of grad school. If that is what you want to do, don't let anyone tell you different. You can do it if you really want to bad enough.
  7. by   Gardengal
    Gracey,

    I believe that you need enough experience clinically after graduation to give you a good clinical knowledge base from which to apply your new knowledge. I don't think you are pursuing your Masters too soon. Everyone is different in their learning styles and some need a few years, some never are ready and some need to start within a year from school so they can keep the momentum of studying going.

    Let's face it. It's easy to procrastinate and who can truly define a timeline for readiness. My only objection to persons pursuing a Masters is when they do it as soon as they graduate from their BSN (unless they already worked as a clinical nurse as a diploma or Associate degree nurse) My objection in that case is because I don't think the clinical knowhow is there in order to truly apply the additional didactic information and apply it.

    After a year if you feel ready you are. I imagine that it will take a couple of years going to school part time and as you are continuing to work, you are also able to use your new knowledge in your program to help your current patients, just as you are able to use your current clinical skills to aid you in your studies. Good Luck.

    Julie
  8. by   kmchugh
    I don't entirely agree with Julie. There are some people who should wait, but there are others who have the common sense (or whatever) to be able to pursue a master's right out of undergrad.

    So, what's your comfort level? One advantage of what you are doing is that you are continuing to work while you study. That gives you more opportunity to reinforce what you are learning in the clinical environment. Nothing in the world wrong with that.

    Irritant Alert: Some who say wait, like Julie, have entirely valid reasons, whether I or anyone else agrees with those reasons or not. However, I left an SICU after three years to pursue my anesthesia degree. I received a lot of advice on the way out the door, and some of that advice was along the lines "if you want to be a really good CRNA, you should work in the ICU for another (1), (3), or even (5) years. Otherwise you don't have the knowledge it takes." What I discovered was that part of the human condition is a desire on some people's part not to see someone else succeed beyond the level the speaker achieved. For whatever reason, they have chosen to stay where they are, and envy or dislike those who are moving on. Factor that in when thinking about advice you are receiving.

    Besides, you graduated in 2001, right? By my calculations, its LATE 2002. You had to have graduated at least, what, nine months before beginning your first semester (if this fall was your first semester of grad school). If you are ready and want to move on, DO IT! I wish you success, good luck, and have fun.

    Kevin McHugh
  9. by   Q.
    I personally lean towards having a good solid working experience as a nurse before persuing grad school, especially in a role such as a CNS. Some programs, such as CRNA school, require at least a year of critical care experience - and that is for a good reason. However, I have seen people go right from BSN to MSN and have done fine; others have floundered clinically and not been respected by floor nurses. To each his own. Me personally? I knew I wanted to persue my education, but worked for 4 solid years before going to grad school.

    Good luck in whatever you do.
  10. by   renerian
    Wow I am almost done with my graduate program and with working full time with 5 kids it is so HARD. No time for anything else but work, school and housework. Go now while your life is less complicated.


    renerian
  11. by   llg
    I worked for a staff nurse for 2 years, then got my Master's (went full time, without working while in school). It worked out fine for me. I was a NICU CNS for 10 years. Then I went back to school for a PhD. Since then, I have taught a little, and done more NICU CNS stuff. Now, I am in a hospital job that is partly staff development and partly administrative -- working on nursing shortage issues, serving as liaison to local schools of nursing, coordinating our student nurse extern program -- and generally helping out the hospital's chief nurse executive.

    I think the important thing is that you get both academic book learning and also clinical experience. Both teach you valuable things. However, whether you get that clinical experience before, during, or immediately after graduate school doesn't matter nearly as much as the effort you make to get the most learning out of both types of experiences. Also, it's critical to keep learning throughout your career. It's when you think you are "done" and "know it all" that you become dangerous!

    Good luck!
    llg
    Last edit by llg on Dec 4, '02
  12. by   2banurse
    Originally posted by kmchugh
    I don't entirely agree with Julie. There are some people who should wait, but there are others who have the common sense (or whatever) to be able to pursue a master's right out of undergrad.

    So, what's your comfort level? One advantage of what you are doing is that you are continuing to work while you study. That gives you more opportunity to reinforce what you are learning in the clinical environment. Nothing in the world wrong with that.

    Irritant Alert: Some who say wait, like Julie, have entirely valid reasons, whether I or anyone else agrees with those reasons or not. However, I left an SICU after three years to pursue my anesthesia degree. I received a lot of advice on the way out the door, and some of that advice was along the lines "if you want to be a really good CRNA, you should work in the ICU for another (1), (3), or even (5) years. Otherwise you don't have the knowledge it takes." What I discovered was that part of the human condition is a desire on some people's part not to see someone else succeed beyond the level the speaker achieved. For whatever reason, they have chosen to stay where they are, and envy or dislike those who are moving on. Factor that in when thinking about advice you are receiving.

    Besides, you graduated in 2001, right? By my calculations, its LATE 2002. You had to have graduated at least, what, nine months before beginning your first semester (if this fall was your first semester of grad school). If you are ready and want to move on, DO IT! I wish you success, good luck, and have fun.

    Kevin McHugh
    I totally agree with Kevin. You have to decide what's best for you. For some it would probably be better to get more clinical experience, for others not. I've decided to go for the LPN instead of the ADN for two reasons. First, I feel that the LPN program will give me more clinical experience in the 11 month program than the ADN which is two years. Since I can't get into the BSN until Fall '04 due to having to take a couple more prereqs. Second, since the BSN and subsequently an MSN, I will be on track whether I took the ADN or the LPN, however, I think I would feel more confidently clinically because of the LPN.

    Best of luck to you!
    Kris
  13. by   Pamelita
    HI
    I am going to finish my BSN this summer and my ultimate goal is to be a geriatric ARNP.
    I graduated last year with my ADN and I've working for a year w/vent patients/ICUstep/med/surge, etc, ha,ha we are all in one.
    anyways, I do believe that if you are ready to go on you should do it. I am 23!!!!! talk about young but all I hear is how hard is when you are married and have kids. Even when you are not married and have no kids is hard!!!
    Go for it! experience will come, school if you don't do it now, maybe it will be too late and you will Regret it forever!!! I am sure I don't want to regret it. Plus, you have your whole life to work, gain experience and enjoy it
    take care
    Pam
  14. by   WashYaHands
    Since most graduate/CNS programs are 3 year programs (they include both the generic Master's content with the CNS component), you'll have 4 years of experience when you graduate, plus your advance practice nurse knowledge. Geriatric practitioners are in short supply and badly needed. I say go for it. Best of luck to you!

    Linda

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