A time to reform nursing education? - page 6

by nyteshade

10,821 Views | 115 Comments

After reading some very interesting posts around here lately in regards to "fluff" being taught in nursing school, I wonder if it is time to reform nursing education. I feel we could do without the nursing diagnosis. I... Read More


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    Nursing school is hard. It is a fantastic career, but it takes a lot for one to earn their title. If anything, it seems that now 4 years is not enough to accomplish everything that is required of you to learn without pushing your sanity over the edge. For those who have made it - you should be proud of yourselves for accomplishing such a hard task.

    I hated doing nursing care plans when I was in school years ago and I too wondered why we had to do this and that. Only years later did it make sense and lead me to an appreciation for what I have learned. I understand that sometimes the theory part and the need to support all your actions with evidence based research seems tedious and useless at times, but I can tell you that having lived outside of the U.S. for 3 years now and having experience first hand not only teaching nursing students in another country (where no textbooks, eletronic libraries, or equipment is available), and being a patient in the hospitals and clinics here - I truly wish you could understand how well you have it in the U.S. AND for the high quality education and endless resources you have there. Nurses in the U.S. today have such a great name to them compared to other parts of the world.

    While I find nurses very kind here, I also often find that many lack the theory behind their practice or the theory they have is from what their teachers taught them rather than based on up to date evidence. They often are not encouraged to critically think or to question a doctor. When I taught students abroad, I worked very hard, despite having very limited resources (as in a 1980s photo copy of a fundamentals of nursing text to teach med/surg nursing), to teach them to critically think. It was so rewarding to see them put the theory and the practice together with evidence based data (the little we could find, in Spanish, for free online).
    nyteshade, CuriousMe, and Fiona59 like this.
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    Quote from SummitAP
    My BSN program has skill sheets with two columns. One for lab checkoffs (which must be done first) and the second column is for real world check offs on real patients.

    We have ~800 hours of clinicals and our final 200 hours are 1:1
    with a preceptor working like a nurse. I think this is a great model.

    I think this is an outstanding method to cement the theory with applications. I am a huge believer in the underlying understanding though. The so called "fluff" and theory is what makes you a thinking clinician with skills rather than just a technician. That's why nurses can get decent pay.

    One thing I do think there should be MORE of: NURSING RESIDENCY. There are just a few of these programs, and more growing, but it needs to be the standard.
    why do people post stuff like this and never post the name of their school ?
    if your school is great, don't you think others would benefit in knowing the name ?
    Fiona59 likes this.
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    Quote from Flying ICU RN
    If you really want to make a difference in nursing education, turn it into a pre-med eligible curriculum to give nurses the ability to transfer the basic science prerequisites for med school later if so desired.

    YES!!!!!

    Rensoul
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    I'm in my first semester of an ADN program and honestly, I wish we had more clinical time. I don't feel like we have enough time in the lab (we get 4 hours a week) or in clinical (1 shift of 7 hours a week, this includes pre conference, post conference and dinner so in reality we are with patients about 4.5 hours a week). I also hate how we don't get our pts till we get there so we don't have time to look up whats going on with them, the meds they are on, or anything. Ugh.
    DogWmn, nyteshade, and Not_A_Hat_Person like this.
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    Quote from james_lankford
    why do people post stuff like this and never post the name of their school ?
    if your school is great, don't you think others would benefit in knowing the name ?
    Just as with employers, it is usually not wise to advertise who you are with. Saying the wrong thing in a public forum, even if you thought it was positive, can be bad for your career. I am not an official spokesperson.

    If anyone does want to know, they can message me.
    cherryames1949 likes this.
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    Quote from retired-603
    I have been in Nursing RN/BSN for 34 + years and never used a Nursing Diagnosis. We in the real world use Medical Diagnosis across the board to plan treatment along with the MD. I hated the concept of nursing diagnosis and found it to be a waste of time.
    This is one of my main problems with it. It introduces vocabulary that does not cross into other areas of the multi-disciplinary team. The medical diagnosis is adequate to make a nursing care plan.
    DogWmn, nyteshade, netglow, and 2 others like this.
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    I have been an RN for about four months. I graduated from nursing school in June. We had TONS of clinicals during nursing school but I feel we did nothing! All we did was change beds, give baths and VERY RARELY give medications. Luckily we have a nursing practicum (the very last class) where you actually do RN stuff ... not CNA stuff. You have 120 hours to learn how to be a good RN that you should have been learning over the course of 2 years. Clinical experiences should be changed, be more student friendly and more flexible!
    DogWmn, nyteshade, netglow, and 1 other like this.
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    Quote from ruaalien2
    I also hate how we don't get our pts till we get there so we don't have time to look up whats going on with them, the meds they are on, or anything. Ugh.

    That's how it is in the real world. Nurses don't have all night to fumble and think about the meds that they will be giving in the morning (unless you do night shift... haha)! My school required us to go to the clinical site the night before and get ALL the information on the patient and look EVERYTHING up and write tons of plans and look up EVERY single med, all the adverse reactions, drug interactions and all that lovely stuff. I really did hate it and it was a waste of time.
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    I'm in my first semester of nursing coursework in a BSN program, and I have a previous degree in an unrelated field. College is usually a bit different than it is in the real world. A good program, no matter what field, will try to emulate the real world as much as possible, but some programs lack the appropriate funding and resources for staff or equipment.

    All those "fluff" classes, the electives, statistics, whatever it may be may seem really useless while you are taking them. But I've found that I really appreciate my well-rounded education from my previous degree, where my curriculum was centered around humanities and journalism.

    Even though they may not perfectly relate to my future career as a nurse, my education has expanded my world view. With a well-rounded education, I'm not just filled with useless knowledge. I feel like I can better contribute to society because I understand and appreciate the realms outside of my specific career. It sounds corny, but I think it's true.
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    Quote from nursel56
    This is one of my main problems with it. It introduces vocabulary that does not cross into other areas of the multi-disciplinary team. The medical diagnosis is adequate to make a nursing care plan.
    Just this. Just this alone is reason enough.
    GeneralJinjur and nyteshade like this.


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