For those of you that are a nurse and those of you who call yourself a nurse!! - page 5

by StaceRacer1 7,615 Views | 46 Comments

OH MY GOSH!!!! I JUST GOT HOME A LITTLE WHILE AGO, WHEN I LOGGED IN TO FIND OUT THAT THE POST I POSTED ON SATURDAY HAS BECOME QUITE ENGAGING!!!! I HAVE JUST GOT DONE WITH A 20 HOUR SHIFT!!! I AM QUITE TIRED, BUT I HAVE TO... Read More


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    IN PA, nurse is a protected title under: "The Professional Nursing Law." Not all states have this legal protection of their practice.

    3. Registered Nurse, Use of Title and Abbreviation "R.N."; Credentials; Fraud.--Any person who holds a license to practice professional nursing in this Commonwealth, or who is maintained on inactive status in accordance with section 11 of this act, shall have the right to use the title "registered nurse" and the abbreviation "R.N." No other person shall engage in the practice of professional nursing or use the title "registered nurse" or the abbreviation "R.N." to indicate that the person using the same is a registered nurse. No person shall sell or fraudulently obtain or fraudulently furnish any nursing diploma, license, record, or registration or aid or abet therein.

    http://www.dos.state.pa.us/bpoa/lib/...d/nurseact.pdf
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    Where I work, our advice "nurse" is a md from the phillipines who has not passed the us boards twice. I have tried numerous times to get everyone to quit calling us nurses, and if asked i say we do not have any nurses in this office only medical assistants, and 1 EMT. But I am not going to loose my job over it, I just correct people when I hear it.
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    Thank you, NRSKarenRN, I was looking for that when I noticed you had already posted it. I think the bottom line here is just that we have all worked very hard to be a "nurse" and we take pride in that job title.

    I work with some very very good Er techs, one of them has been heard telling people she is an RN...not a good thing. Not much we can do unless we catch her again.

    I suggest we all take pride in what we do, not what the letters say behind our name.
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    I am a nursing assistant, and I would never refer to myself as a nurse. I will not refer to myself as a nurse until I am one. I hate it when CNA's refer to themselves as nurses.

    I agree that the 'ass wiper' term has to go! CNA's and nurses are a team. CNA's are part of the nursing team although they are not yet nurses. I plan on becoming an RN, and still, I will not see CNA's as ass wipers. Us CNA's work hard for our money, and so do nurses.

    CNA's have not had nearly as much education as nurses, and I will wait until I am a nurse to say "hi, I'm Amanda, I will be your nurse tonight."

    I have even found myself correcting paitents who have said "Nurse, can you help me?" I just say "Actually, I'm a CNA."

    I agree with you totally
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    Some states require that all health care professionals wear identification badges when interacting with patients. Staff are to have their educational status and training on their badges. When a CNA has "nurse" on his/her ID badge, that is considered to be false representation and can lead to legal disputes. The patient has the right to know who is taking care of them and exactly what their credentials are. I began as a candy striper-CNA-RN-BSN and am now working on my masters to become a CRNA. Everyone deserves the appropriate title on their ID badge, because when that title is earned, it is respected. Leslie.
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    Quote from 135ctv

    Why do some nurses put all their degrees after their names? I can understand BSN as it relates to nursing, but I have also seen BA, MA, MS, MBA etc. Wouldn't LPN or RN or BSN be sufficient?
    If I had spent so much time earning the above degrees, I think I would want people to know about them. Yeah, LPN or RN is sufficient, but I think those who have earned advanced degrees deserve to wear them proudly.
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    note: this thread was started in 2001!!! the last post was 2003.


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