This person outranks me?! - page 2

Since I started working in health care as a CNA nearly six years ago, I've had many experiences that have left me wondering how some people get into the positions they hold. I was not a youngin when... Read More

  1. by   Irish_Mist
    Why does your username title say LPN if you are a CNA?

    Anyway, I am a 29 year old RN with a babyish face. If I had a dollar for every time my nursing judgement has been questioned by a PCT who has supposedly been "at it" for 20 plus years, I'd be rich. Just because you have many years of experience as a PCT/CNA does not mean you know as much as an RN.

    If you are so bitter about being outranked and think you know so much, put your money where your mouth is and go to nursing school, pass the NCLEX, become an RN and then take on all the responsibilities that come with it. Until then, you don't know what you don't know.
  2. by   Aunt Slappy
    Quote from klone
    OP, why have you been working as a CNA for the past 6 years when you're an LPN?
    I said I started working in health care six years ago as a CNA. I earned my LPN certificate two years ago and was licensed a month later.

    Quote from meanmaryjean
    Also curious why your bio says '2 years experience' when you joined 12 months ago.....
    Because I have two years of experience as a LPN. Pretty sure the "years of experience" the profile info asks for doesn't refer to your membership duration on the website.
  3. by   Purple_roses
    To be honest, I could say the same thing about myself! Haha! The other day I was just staring at an acronym in a doctor's note...a really simple acronym that I see every day at work and I could NOT for the life of me remember what it stood for and had to ask a coworker. We both had a good laugh over it. Sometimes I just need an extra shot of espresso in my coffee.
    Last edit by Purple_roses on Dec 14, '17
  4. by   Aunt Slappy
    Quote from Irish_Mist
    Why does your username title say LPN if you are a CNA?

    Anyway, I am a 29 year old RN with a babyish face. If I had a dollar for every time my nursing judgement has been questioned by a PCT who has supposedly been "at it" for 20 plus years, I'd be rich. Just because you have many years of experience as a PCT/CNA does not mean you know as much as an RN.

    If you are so bitter about being outranked and think you know so much, put your money where your mouth is and go to nursing school, pass the NCLEX, become an RN and then take on all the responsibilities that come with it. Until then, you don't know what you don't know.
    LMAO I challenge you to claim where I said I know as much as a RN. The whole point of this thread is that he *should* know more than me.
  5. by   macawake
    Quote from Aunt Slappy
    LMAO I challenge you to claim where I said I know as much as a RN. The whole point of this thread is that he *should* know more than me.

    We can hardly draw the conclusion that he doesn't in fact know more than you, from the three examples you mentioned... To me they don't reveal any major knowledge deficit on his part. Since we have no way to to find out about all the things that he might know, that you don't, your examples are simply not enough basis to compare your knowledge against his. It's quite likely that he knows many things that you don't.

    Also, as many posters have mentioned, it's much better to ask if one is unsure about something than to pretend that one knows. To me that's a sign of personal and professional maturity.

    Quote from Sour Lemon
    I have no idea. What are we testing for? A stool sample might be OK with urine in it. Urine for culture definitely wouldn't be OK with stool mixed in. I would have called the lab and asked.
    That's what I was thinking too. Not my area of expertise at all, so I would have called to find out. But it seems we should all have known that macroscopic amounts of food/stomach contents are a no-no... OP, how about the microscopic amounts of food that are likely present in many sputum samples? Are they okay?

    Signed,

    Nurse Idiot, MSN

    Last edit by macawake on Dec 14, '17
  6. by   Aunt Slappy
    Quote from JKL33
    Yes, please tell us the answer to #1!
    Let's use a little critical thinking here. If you need a sample of pulmonary sputum for testing, and it now includes gastric contents, is that a valid sample?
  7. by   Sour Lemon
    As a new graduate RN, I had a CNA scowl at me and question why I put a patient's diaper on backwards. Maybe it was a moment for her to shine and me to fade into the darkness, I don't know.
  8. by   Sour Lemon
    Quote from Aunt Slappy
    Let's use a little critical thinking here. If you need a sample of pulmonary sputum for testing, and it now includes gastric contents, is that a valid sample?
    I have no idea. What are we testing for? A stool sample might be OK with urine in it. Urine for culture definitely wouldn't be OK with stool mixed in. I would have called the lab and asked.
  9. by   Irish_Mist
    Quote from Aunt Slappy
    LMAO I challenge you to claim where I said I know as much as a RN. The whole point of this thread is that he *should* know more than me.
    I'm sorry that I didn't know your entire work experience based on your long and poorly written original post. Your entire original post smacks of arrogance and judgement so I don't think most people would blame me for drawing my conclusions about you. This person is a new nurse and is probably feeling unsure of himself. Perhaps he knows the answers to these questions but is just asking for reassurance. Either way, your post screams "I have a huge chip on my shoulder".
  10. by   JKL33
    Quote from Aunt Slappy
    Let's use a little critical thinking here. If you need a sample of pulmonary sputum for testing, and it now includes gastric contents, is that a valid sample?
    You tell me...if you hack up an AFB+ loogie and puke a little at the same time, is there still AFB in the sample???
    Last edit by JKL33 on Dec 14, '17
  11. by   JKL33
    We can all think of reasons why the sample in question might not work, but smart people don't want to take the chance of throwing away an adequate sample that wasn't pleasant to obtain.
  12. by   Purple_roses
    Quote from JKL33
    You tell me...if you hack up a AFB+ loogie and puke a little at the same time, is there still AFB in the sample???
    I was going to say....true critical thinking should lead a nurse to this conclusion. I could see needing to get a new sputum sample from a policy and procedure standpoint, but critical thinking is what has made multiple nurses here ask OP if gastric contents would honestly disturb testing for AFB.

    OP, if you’re bringing this much snark into work, I’m impressed that the nurse from your OP is still asking for your input at work at all.
  13. by   amoLucia
    I am not so proud and self-inflated that I don't ask for explanations of abbreviations here on AN. I'm asking all the time!!! I asked for something yesterday.

    Things that are simple to you, I may have NEVER heard. I remember asking what NOC was when I first started here. I worked the 11-7 shift for some half or so of my 35+ year career but I never heard it referred to as NOC.

    And I looked at your 50 y/o case pt with IVF and pregnancy WAS NOT my first thought.

    To macawake - I may have to ask you about half of the abbreviations you dropped.

    And if I hack up a sput that might not be perfect, you'd better check with God to make 100% sure the specimen is not good before you toss it. I am not a good sput cougher-upper or urine pee-in-the-cupper.

    You have a extremely lopsided view of people and their expertise. Cut the dude some slack.

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