this is for all nurses not just Pittsburgh area nurses!!!!!! - page 4

So Nursing Assistants aren't considered "Nurses". If that's the case, then what are we considered? Certified ass wipers? I am a C.N.A. and am considered a "Nurse". We don't get the Respect we... Read More

  1. by   nurs4kids
    Originally posted by chili2641:
    <STRONG>This B/B is good therapy for me. I have been a NA for eight years and I am still very young. I am at a transitional point in my life right now. I have an interst in nursing because I am a cna and it is my job. No it is not my career but I still have to put up with the same attitudes because I work there too.</STRONG>

    chili2641
    Veteran
    Member # 8101
    posted April 07, 2001 08:14 AM
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    I am a twenty-five year old cna from Michigan. I just recently left the field of nursing to pursue other goals. I work with young offenders by helping them to complete their GED's. I will be starting graduate school soon. I hope to one day work as a prison counselor or a public defender. I am an advocate for cnas and I am always in the mood to respectfully argue with others.
    ------------------

    well, which way is it? nursing or not?? lol
  2. by   nurs4kids
    awwww night owl..
    my little ball of fire, was simply being sarcastic. I'm sure..uh, ok I seriously doubt that's her true feelings.
  3. by   Nickli
    I am also a CNA(14 yrs) in Virginia we also have to sit for board and can be sued. I went to college to become a CNA and enjoy it. I feel I am in the Medical field but do not ever state that I am a nurse. I also can do dressings, pass meds, do rounds with doctors, take orders and do lots of charting. See, I went back for Med Tech. So I have been discovering that there is alot of negativity concerning who is or isn't a nurse. We are all in Nursing.
  4. by   Mijourney
    Folks, a crime was committed against someone, and a debate ensues over inferiority/superiority of titles again. It should be an embarrassment to all of us when a paid caregiver commits an act of offense against a patient. That affects all of us no matter our title. We should be discussing ways of thoroughly checking out a person's background before they are hired to perform any type of patient care. How can we, in the nursing profession, protect the public from unstable people?

    If you have a problem with the way the news was presented, simply write, call, or email them.
  5. by   night owl
    Nurse4kids, I understand that she's your sister and that you're being alittle defensive for her, but I would rather not take this up with you for her. I'm sure that if she has something to say about her professionalism as a nurse, you can be certain that she'll let me know...
  6. by   oramar
    Pennsylvania has pretty strick laws about back ground checks for persons taking care of anyone in LTC facilities or hospitals. Since I never heard the original sensational news lead in that misrepresented the attendant as a nurse, I did not write the news people about it. However, I am going to write them and our local representative and tell them I think some investigation should be done here to find out if the regulations were followed in this case.

    [ May 26, 2001: Message edited by: oramar ]
  7. by   nurs4kids
    Originally posted by night owl:
    <STRONG>Nurse4kids, I understand that she's your sister and that you're being alittle defensive for her, but I would rather not take this up with you for her. I'm sure that if she has something to say about her professionalism as a nurse, you can be certain that she'll let me know...</STRONG>
    nightowl,
    I never intended to "take this up with you for her". I'm well aware that she is MORE than capable of handling her own business. I merely intended to state that she was using sarcasm. However, I fail to see any indication toward lack of professionalism in her post(s). If speaking one's mind is unprofessional, then I will NEVER be a professional!
  8. by   Future LPN Sheryl
    "Please note I am not saying that an RN/LPN or any other professioanl is incapable of a heinous crime, only that with education, background checks, and licenses that are regularly renewed it is much harder to fall between the cracks and therefore much less common for a licensed professional to be accused of a crime-especially one involving the very people that they worked so hard to be licensed to care for."

    RNPD, I am a CNA and I do have a license that needs to be renewed every 2 years and IS checked for employment, complaints etc. And who says CNA's don't have education??
  9. by   RNPD
    Sheryl-"Personal care aides" are not the same as CNAs. In much (if not most of the country), nursing assistants are not educated (IN THE FIELD OF NURSING-they may be highly educated in other fields) nor are they licensed or even certified (and this includes PCAs, PCTs, etc). And even those that say they are licensed and need to renew periodicaly are actually holding certificates, not licenses-hence CNA or CERTIFIED nursing assistant. Those that are certified have much more education for nursing assistant and their certificate and renewal of same would make it much harder for people of questionable character to slip through the cracks. But most nursing assistants or personal care aids are minimally educated (again I mean in nursing tasks) and are not required to go through backround checks. Therefore it is more difficult to monitor the type of person who is taking care of the most vulnerable of our people-the patient.

    BTW, there is a difference between a license and a certficate. A license is a legal document that gives permission to perform specific actions or engage in specific activities. A certicate is a document that certifies fulfillment of duties or requirements, such as a course of study. They are not the same.

    I was wrong in the other post when I said to use CNA for the sake of brevity and I'm sorry. For an assistant who is certified, that is as frustrating to hear as for a nurse hearing an assistant be called a nurse. I had no business comparing a minimally educated (in NURSING) person with one who has a more extensive course, is certified, and renews that certificate periodically. I'm sorry and will edit the first post to correct this.

    [ May 26, 2001: Message edited by: RNPD ]

    [ May 26, 2001: Message edited by: RNPD ]
  10. by   chili2641
    I work as a cna on the weekends. During the week I work with young offenders. I am taking a home health position this summer. I decided to pursue a career in criminal law and hope to one day pratice as a defense attorney. I have an A.A and a B.S in criminal justice and behavioral analysis. Thanks for asking.
  11. by   Q.
    Nightowl-

    I will say one simple thing. My "sister" as you called her, is not really my blood sister - good lord. And I also don't think she was "defending" me - I think she was merely pointing out the obvious.

    And secondly, yes, in reference to my post about LPNs, that was sarcasm. I feel no further need to defend my professionalism to you.
  12. by   lita1857
    I would like to pose a question to be mulled over, Do we hear physicians going on and on about qualifications/scope of practice/titles/education etc.? Have you ever heard a physician assistant(PA) represent themselves as the doctor? Here on the BB is a good example of what has held nursing back so many years.When Florence took the lamp and went out to care for people, did she do it as a NURSE? or the other fractions? What was so clear then has become so muddy now. Maybe the answer to nursing is right at our roots.
  13. by   Q.
    Originally posted by lita1857:
    <STRONG>I would like to pose a question to be mulled over, Do we hear physicians going on and on about qualifications/scope of practice/titles/education etc.? </STRONG>
    I am really not trying to be a snot, because I think you had a good post, but actually, in answer to your question - I say a resounding YES. Our residents have the same debates from 1st to 2nd to 3rd to 4th year, to the chief resident, to the OB resident vs the family practice resident, down to if you are general surgery vs orthopedic surgery!

    The thing I notice is, that most residents, at least the ones I work with, are able to know what they do not know, and appreciate the knowledge that their "higher ranked" colleagues have acquired.

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