Thinking out of the box re: Nursing education - page 2

a nurse attorney stated during a presentation that Associate Degree Nurses should be awarded a Bachelor's degree b/c of all the work involved in becoming an RN. This was a EUREKA!!! moment for... Read More

  1. by   oldiebutgoodie
    I think the biggest issue with ADN vs BSN is the cost. In my mind, most anybody doing an ADN program right now is probably just as able to do a BSN program. However, ADN programs are way more affordable than BSN programs.

    To me, the answer is affordable BSN programs. If somehow community colleges could be accredited to offer BSN programs (with the requisite research, etc. classes) that would help to end this issue.

    Right now, BSN programs seem to cost an arm and a leg.

    Oldiebutgoodie
  2. by   anne74
    The whole idea behind a bachelor's degree is to spend 4 years concentrating on a certain subject, but also studying other subjects to make you a well-rounded individual. These include English, History, Research, Arts, etc. All of the other bachelor's degrees spend extra time studying subjects outside of their major. That's just how the Bachelor's Degree model works. It's quite possible that engineers, accountants, etc. could be done with their schooling in 2 years if they only concentrated on their crucial classes.

    So, practically speaking, the 2 yrs of just core nursing classes is probably enough to train a nurse. Two years is probably enough to train any professional, if we cut out all the extra, unrelated classes. But if we want our profession to have respect from the public, we have to follow the model of all other professions, and use the 4-yr bachelor's model. And having the extra education is not a bad thing - I do think it adds more depth to a person. But it sucks that it's expensive and not always applicable to your day-to-day job.

    And yes - BSN programs are outrageously priced. Mine cost $57,000. Just my student loans are 1/3 of my income. Why don't nursing salaries keep in line with the cost of nursing school?
    Last edit by anne74 on Jan 22, '07
  3. by   scribblerpnp
    [quote=psalm_55;2028788]of hours required are less than those required for nurses.

    a close relative graduated law school a year ago. law school is 3 years beyond a bachelor's. the first 2 years are intense. the 3rd year is considered a "waste" by many. Some law schools are toying with the idea of doing away with that 3rd year. others are offering a doctorate degree (J.D) at the completion of the 3 years.
    quote]


    OK, I know this is a little off subject and nit-picky, but ALL LAWYERS who graduate a school of law graduate with a J.D. (Juris Doctorate). It is a doctorate-level program
  4. by   Tweety
    Quote from RNsRWe
    I got not a single credit for any of my clinical work; the additional lecture time and skills lab lecture time was ALL that got additional credits. Why not recognize the academic efforts that go into those clinical assignments? And, therefore, accept that a new level of degree is long since past-due?

    That's a shame. I got 9 credit hours per nursing course, because of the clinical component.
  5. by   JeanettePNP
    Quote from Angie O'Plasty, RN
    Many of my patients don't even realize that nurses have to go to college nowadays. People hear the word "nurse" and automatically think "hiney-wiper," not "college grad" equipped with a brain.
    Actually my perception was the opposite. Before I started looking into nursing school, I thought they needed six years of training at least! Was I shocked to learn that you could become a nurse in only two years.
  6. by   Tweety
    Quote from anne74
    The whole idea behind a bachelor's degree is to spend 4 years concentrating on a certain subject, but also studying other subjects to make you a well-rounded individual. These include English, History, Research, Arts, etc. All of the other bachelor's degrees spend extra time studying subjects outside of their major. That's just how the Bachelor's Degree model works. It's quite possible that engineers, accountants, etc. could be done with their schooling in 2 years if they only concentrated on their crucial classes.
    Most Associate Degrees also have many non-nursing requirements in the social sciences and arts. When most of us upgrade to a BSN it's not those courses we're short on. In fact I was short a humanities course and that's it. However, I went to a christian school that required some religion courses. The courses we need are in assessment, research, community health, pahto-pharm, leadership etc. More nursing stuff.
    Last edit by Tweety on Jan 22, '07
  7. by   Tweety
    I decided to look up the credit hours at St. Pete College for various associate degree programs:

    Dental Hygiene - 88 hours
    Physical Therapy Assistant - 74
    Radiology - 77

    Nursing - 72

    Students here can't complain that Nursing is more credit hours than other programs. It is an NLN approved program.

    I realize this is one school and can't be generalized.

    I was quite surprised. All of the programs have a heavy clinical component. We could be elitist and say things like, "but we have people's lives in our hands", and "we spend much more time on care plans and our program is harder."

    I think they would object to a ADN becoming a baccalaureate degree based on these kinds of arguements.

    I was also waiting for someone, and it did happen, with a BSN who would resent earning their BSN in a BSN program and seeing ADN's given it. Frankly, I'm on my 15th of 18 courses needed to complete my BSN, and if they instituted something like this I too would be just a tad bit resentful.
    Last edit by Tweety on Jan 22, '07
  8. by   txspadequeenRN
    Power to the Mods!!! LOL

    Quote from Tweety
    We moderators are not going to let that happen. There are a few open threads on ADN vs. BSN and those are the only ones allowed to go on and on. This topic is a little different, and we do allow for discussions that ask specific questions. If it goes on page after page in a similar vein to existing threads, we'll close this one. If it stays on topic, no problem if it goes page after page.

close