Things you didn't learn in nursing school Things you didn't learn in nursing school - pg.5 | allnurses

Things you didn't learn in nursing school - page 5

Share your thoughts :) Nurses, please share your stories of things you wished you learned in nursing school. also shared this on the allnurses.com facebook page... Read More

  1. Visit  nrsang97 profile page
    #52 0
    Quote from PMFB-RN

    *** When I was in nursing school we HAD to place IVs and draw blood. I remeber we had to place 2 sucessful IVs on real breathing patients in order to pass. No IVs = failure and repeat the clinical or flunk out of nursing school. Same with NG (had to place 1 in a real patient) and many other skills. The students from the local community college who do clinicals in my hospital also have to do hands on skills or fail. Interestingly enough the students from the local state university do not have to do the same.
    I would question the liabiliety issue considering other nursing schools are teaching basic nursing skills. If you can find another school in your state I think you could make a strong case.
    Besides this should be something a prospective nursing student should be researching when choosing a nursing school. Ask if the basic nursing skills are taught before choosing that school.
    No one I know in MI has been able to start an iv during nursing school.

    I never had the opportunity to insert a ngt in nursing school. I was given that opportunity as a new grad.

    Nursing students don't come into the job well prepared at all.
  2. Visit  tewdles profile page
    #53 0
    Quote from nrsang97
    No one I know in MI has been able to start an iv during nursing school.

    I never had the opportunity to insert a ngt in nursing school. I was given that opportunity as a new grad.

    Nursing students don't come into the job well prepared at all.
    They used to be well prepared.
    I attended college in MI...we practiced IVs on each other, passed NGs on each other. Those skills were required in order to pass, as were urinary catheter insertion for the age groups.
  3. Visit  nrsang97 profile page
    #54 0
    Quote from tewdles

    They used to be well prepared.
    I attended college in MI...we practiced IVs on each other, passed NGs on each other. Those skills were required in order to pass, as were urinary catheter insertion for the age groups.
    We were not allowed to practice on each other except for bed baths, bed changes, etc. I was more than willing to let classmates practice iv, and injections on me. We did testing in lab, and if we got the clinical opportunity we took it.
  4. Visit  francoml profile page
    #55 2
    Wow I can't believe what some of you missed in nursing school. I will graduate in may and I have something like 200 hours of clinical time this semester alone! We have to do all of our patients NG tubes, IVs, Foleys, ect. The only thing I cannot do as a student nurse is give blood products or push drugs in central lines. Our clinical rotations are 12 hour shifts in the hospital and we have up to 4 patients we are required to give total care to. My program is super intensive, maybe that is why so many people drop but I must say even though I have a ton of things still to learn, I have always felt prepared going into my clinical rotations. This semester we even spend 5 days (all 12 hour shifts) at a level one trauma center were we focus on intensive care, emergency medicine, and one 12 hour shift in the burn unit! I have also spent 3 days (12 hr shifts) at a mental institution that housed severely unstable and criminally insane patients and I was involved in every aspect of their care. This final semester only consists of 2 days of class time during the week and 3 days of clinical rotation! We even have clinical on the weekends sometimes. We are known in our state for our rigorous program and in 5 weeks we will be having a recruitment luncheon in which employers from around the state will attend! I have already been approached my the head of ER and ICU asking me to work for them when I graduate (ER all the way baby)!!!!
  5. Visit  applewhitern profile page
    #56 1
    We had a rigorous program, too, but that was back in the 80's. We started IV's on each other, gave each other IM injections, etc. The orientation for my first nursing job was 5 days. That was on a 44 bed telemetry unit! After my 5 day orientation, I was charge nurse with two LPN's working with me. Thank God for those two nurses! By the time I graduated nursing school, I could confidently do skills such as IV's, NG's, etc.
  6. Visit  brillohead profile page
    #57 0
    I'm in nursing school in Michigan (ADN program at a community college), and we can start IVs in Med-Surg III after completing our lab day on IV starts early in the semester. We don't always get a chance to do it in clinical based on census and patient needs, but we are ALLOWED to do it if the opportunity arises.
  7. Visit  turnforthenurse profile page
    #58 2
    The fact that in addition to being a nurse, we also had to be a pharmacist, a therapist, a teacher, a plumber, mechanic, nutritionist, a legal drug dealer, a physical therapist, a punching bag...
  8. Visit  bookworm78910 profile page
    #59 1
    I loved the post that related how none of our 12-hour clinical with it's guaranteed 1/2 hour lunch, "go to the bathroom when you need it", "You're all tired? Let's cut off an hour early.." mentality prepared anyone for the real job of nursing. The thing I didn't learn in nursing school was how to keep my compassion for my 16 patients, while adequately caring for them all, passing their meds on time, all the while Administration is breathing down my neck, and the phone is ringing off the hook because no one has the time to stop and answer. The question is though, if any of us truly knew the end from the beginning, how many of us would have endured nursing school?

    Thank God for the rewarding days, that make the toil and stress worth it. They do come.
  9. Visit  ErikaBrodie profile page
    #60 0
    So sadly true. We have to bend over backwards sometimes just to keep patients happy and hence the hospital happy with "good ratings"
  10. Visit  FlightNurseMoJo profile page
    #61 1
    Quote from PMFB-RN
    *** Nursing students are not demanding enough of the nursing school they are paying for their education. It's abserd that nursing schools are no longer teaching basic nursing skills and instead transfering the responsibiliety to employers. Is it any wonder there is so much reluctance by hospitals to hire new grads? New grads have alwasy been expensive to train, having to train them in the most basic and fundamental skills only adds to the expence.[/INDENT]
    Oh, but don't be too assertive with seeking out learning opportunities or procedures, because then you're labelled "too aggressive" and a "know it all" by your instructors.

    I wish I would have known that the world outside my ivory tower nursing school was cutthroat and full of nurses that would throw a new grad under the bus in a heartbeat.
  11. Visit  PMFB-RN profile page
    #62 0
    Quote from ChristineN
    Nursing school never taught me this either, not even in lab on dummies. It sure would have been nice to have at least been introduced to the skill

    I too have noticed the recent trend of nursing schools failing to teach basic nursing skills.
    My hospital expects new grads to come to us with basic skills.
    I don't expect a new grad to be skilled at something like IV insertion, but I would expect them to understand what would be appropriate sized IVS to choose, where they are likely to find good veins, and know enought to at least make an attempt or two on thier own before calling me.
    The fact that nursing school are often failing to teach basic skills really puts new grads behind the 8 ball and increases our cost to train them, thus more reluctant to hire them in the first place.
    There is one particular DEMDN who doesn't teach and basic skills and nobody wants to hire their grads.
  12. Visit  Loracs72 profile page
    #63 1
    I graduated from a 3 year nursing school and have 40 years under my belt. We also practiced skills such as insertion of NGs, IM injections and that really helped when starting as a new grad. In our senior year we had " Team Nursing" where the students were "in charge" of the unit ( on all shifts ) with backup from the RN's It was a valuable experience and gave us a realistic view of nursing. It takes a lot of practice to start IV's. Fortunately most hospitals have IV teams, but then when you need to start an IV, most nurses don't have that skill. And you need to keep doing that skill to keep your skills fresh. When I was a new RN, the older nurses on the unit were the best preceptors and would give us the confidence we needed ! That doesn't happen anymore.... It seems most new graduates want to be in charge or managers without the hand son skills, which is sad.
  13. Visit  SuzanneP54 profile page
    #64 1

    *** When I was in nursing school we HAD to place IVs and draw blood. I remeber we had to place 2 sucessful IVs on real breathing patients in order to pass. No IVs = failure and repeat the clinical or flunk out of nursing school. Same with NG (had to place 1 in a real patient) and many other skills. The students from the local community college who do clinicals in my hospital also have to do hands on skills or fail. Interestingly enough the students from the local state university do not have to do the same.
    I would question the liabiliety issue considering other nursing schools are teaching basic nursing skills. If you can find another school in your state I think you could make a strong case.
    Besides this should be something a prospective nursing student should be researching when choosing a nursing school. Ask if the basic nursing skills are taught before choosing that school.
    No one I know in MI has been able to start an iv during nursing school.

    I never had the opportunity to insert a ngt in nursing school. I was given that opportunity as a new grad.

    Nursing students don't come into the job well prepared at all.

    While I was in nursing school, i never started an IV, drew labs or inserted any tube into any orifice. That was all done in the lab at school. The learning curve at my first job-oh my! I landed a job in the "hell-hole" of the hospital, but I have damn good skills now!

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