The Value of AN

  1. 24
    Part of the value of AN is that it conveys the norms of the career we’ve all (or most of us, anyway) chosen to those who otherwise wouldn’t have any way of finding out the norms. Nurses know that you don’t call yourself a nurse unless you’ve been through an accredited program, passed the licensing exam, and hold a nursing license. But evidently some nursing schools don’t cover that fact (or some posters were asleep when it was covered) and don’t know that. And pre-nursing students wouldn’t know unless someone told them. Someone told them right here on the site, and all anyone had to do was read the thread. That’s awesome! That’s a resource I could have benefitted greatly from when I was a lowly nursing student. Or a brand new nurse. Or even a not-so-new nurse who couldn’t figure out why my co-workers hated me. (It’s obvious now, but it wasn’t then, and one post here would have cleared up the mystery for me pretty darned quick, had I the intelligence to pay attention.)


    There are those who ask the question and there are hundreds more of those who can benefit from the answer, whether or not they themselves thought to ask the question. “Do I really have to drive to work in the snow?” “How do I survive working the night shift when I’m always tired?” “Why does my preceptor hate me?” “Fired -- now what?” All these burning questions -- and more -- are asked and answered on AN, and even if you didn’t ask the question, reading through the answers may give you glimmers of insight you didn’t know you needed. It’s a valuable resource.


    Like any profession, ours has norms. One of the toughest things about being a newbie is inadvertently stepping on the norms of your profession, and not realizing that you did so until your colleagues are ostracizing you. Reading AN can prevent some of that drama. Yes, you have to drive to work in the snow and it’s unwise to insist to your manager that “it’s not worth my life” to show up when you’re scheduled. Yes, you really have to work your night shifts and your colleagues will be unimpressed when you insist that you’re really too special to work nights, or that you shouldn’t have to because it makes you miserable. Yes, hospitals do have IT departments scanning the social media for references to their institution or posts by their employees or potential employees. Now whether you’ve paid attention and internalized the advice is another story.


    What I really cannot understand is why those who can benefit most from the free insights and advice offered on AN not only reject the information but angrily insist that it’s incorrect or unimportant. I do know that it tells me a lot about that person, and what kind of an employee and a colleague they will make in the future. And, being the kind of person that I am, I’ll admit that it can also lead to a helluva entertaining thread!
    eeffoc_emmig, DoeRN, NurseNightOwl, and 21 others like this.
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  3. 47 Comments so far...

  4. 9
    I love that I can come here and vent semi-anonymously (I do change several details to protect the not-so-innocent and myself) because doing so around my coworkers can bite me in the backside and my family just doesn't get it. As for the entertaining threads, there's currently one going on that I seem to find some strange urge to refresh often. Although I am enjoying my popcorn and wine to go with it!
  5. 0
    I don't even ....

    😬
  6. 8
    Hey Ruby Vee, just a shout out to tell you not all of your advice falls on deaf ears. =) I enjoy the anonymity and community that AN provides.

    I feel like it is very important to reiterate the points about protecting your identity in this day and age of technology. In January an RN who worked for one of the bigger hospitals in my area warned my graduating class about the evils of posting all our social activity on social media. He told us that recruiters including himself, simply put hopefuls names in Google and looked at what came up. Most searches take less than half a second.

    So a word to the not so wise BE CAREFUL, it is not just "crusty old bats" who are talking just to talk, this is coming from somebody who has grown up in the internet age. Don't take it personally!!!!!!
    roser13, SoldierNurse22, sharpeimom, and 5 others like this.
  7. 8
    Quote from Rose_Queen
    I love that I can come here and vent semi-anonymously (I do change several details to protect the not-so-innocent and myself) because doing so around my coworkers can bite me in the backside and my family just doesn't get it. As for the entertaining threads, there's currently one going on that I seem to find some strange urge to refresh often. Although I am enjoying my popcorn and wine to go with it!
    Agree; I think this is an excellent place to come and know you are not alone in discussing and processing a particular event; thinking about career advancement; of even wanting to have a philosophical debate; the discourse becomes much more entertaining and popcorn-ready fun!

    I also think posters who have huge chips on their shoulder SHOULD pay attention; this is NOT Twitter or Facebook, or any other "social" website; it is a place where professional interaction takes place and is a separate bubble; when you enter into AN, there are certain standards that are going to be upheld-it's NEVER personal, but professional, and that may mean putting on grown-up pants to fully understand and accept some of the healthy dose of information that one needs-it will certainly help whoever in the long run.
    Last edit by LadyFree28 on Mar 9
    SoldierNurse22, imintrouble, GrnTea, and 5 others like this.
  8. 4
    Yes AN is a wonderful source to get some preliminary information, but it's an open online forum. The information on here is limited to the same accuracy as Wikipedia in that anybody can contribute anonymously and throw information askew. I wouldn't take what I read on here and apply it to my nursing practice without researching it pretty rigorously in established texts and quality studies. Not that I think I'm any better or anything, I wouldn't go taking an experienced nurses word as Bible without fact-checking either. Not because I'm biased against them, it's just good practice if you don't know something.
  9. 5
    Quote from Ruby Vee
    One of the toughest things about being a newbie is inadvertently stepping on the norms of your profession, and not realizing that you did so until your colleagues are ostracizing you. Reading AN can prevent some of that drama.
    But you ostracize newbies on AN all the time...
    Just because it's anonymous doesn't mean your harsh comments to new nurses, students, pre-nurses aren't taken to heart (and not in a good way). I've been on AN for a while now, and I find myself wincing at your reflexive responses to novices (and I swear whenever a newbie thread is posted, there you are ready to cut them down). My intention here is not to insult you, but this is an honest observation. Your unprompted initiation of this thread--claiming AN is a safe harbor for newbies--is just ironic...
    Last edit by TheCommuter on Mar 10 : Reason: [/QUOTE] tags
  10. 10
    Quote from kanzi monkey
    But you ostracize newbies on AN all the time...
    Just because it's anonymous doesn't mean your harsh comments to new nurses, students, pre-nurses aren't taken to heart (and not in a good way). I've been on AN for a while now, and I find myself wincing at your reflexive responses to novices (and I swear whenever a newbie thread is posted, there you are ready to cut them down). My intention here is not to insult you, but this is an honest observation. Your unprompted initiation of this thread--claiming AN is a safe harbor for newbies--is just ironic...
    I don't think I've ever "ostracized" someone just for being new, or even new and ignorant. Both of those conditions are temporary and fixable. Now someone who is new, ignorant and refuses to learn in the face of new information, or someone new with a horrible attitude or someone new who disrespects the seasoned nurses they encounter, them I may try to educate. After a few attempts to educate the uneducable, it's tough to just let the nonsense continue . . . .

    I think you'll find that if you're new, ask a question and have a good attitude about answers you don't agree with, I can be very helpful. I didn't get all those "LIKES" just for being cutting to innocent posters who wandered in looking for advice with good intentions. There's a difference between being "to the point" or honest and being "ostracizing."
    Last edit by TheCommuter on Mar 10 : Reason: [/QUOTE] tags
  11. 0
    Me neither. I always welcome new members. I would love to learn from them.
  12. 8
    I have learned a lot from AN and appreciate the honesty in some of the responses. No, the OP might not get the answer they were hoping for, but they usually get the truth from a lot of nurses who have "been there, done that".

    thank you all for your honesty and willingness to take time to answer all of our questions


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