The Today Show - page 7

Anyone watch this morning? Their medical expert was on giving tips to patients on how to prevent errors while they are in the hospital. One thing she mentioned was that hospitals (nurses especially)... Read More

  1. by   PANurseRN1
    I'd rather go hunting with Dick Cheney than to go riding with Ted Kennedy.
    Sick.
  2. by   swanganz
    Regarding the prevention of medical errors is simple....you cannot completely prevent errors. They happen, from all angles from the docs, the pharmacists, the nurses... I hope that Matt Laur was trying to spark conversation and truly doesnt believe that dress and medical errors are related. Most people are just ignorant to what responsibilities nurses have.
  3. by   justpoorfect
    How about scrubs that have an imprint of 4 inch letters that say "RN" or "AIDE" or "RESP"? If that's offensive, how about a red cross armband or something?
  4. by   BRANDY LPN
    I am tired and kind of lazy tongiht, so forgive me for not reading the whole thread, and if this has already been mentioned I'm sorry.....

    How in the world will being able to differentiate between staff decrease med errors?????????????????

    I don't care if you wear cutoff shorts and a tube top to work, how many of you have heard of a med error meing caused by an aide, or housekeeping?

    What a bunch of crap, another of the long list of reasons I am no longer practicing.

    Sorry, continue on.... I am all done griping now, and I feel a little better for venting that.
  5. by   mercyteapot
    Wow, and here we've been all along thinking the keys to preventing medical errors were things like safe ratios, adequate training and supervision, staffing levels that ensure no one is forced to come in and work while sick, etc. and it turns out that all along the problem has been our SCRUBS! I don't know about anyone else, but I sure feel silly!!!
  6. by   DusktilDawn
    Quote from swanganz
    Regarding the prevention of medical errors is simple....you cannot completely prevent errors. They happen, from all angles from the docs, the pharmacists, the nurses... I hope that Matt Laur was trying to spark conversation and truly doesnt believe that dress and medical errors are related. Most people are just ignorant to what responsibilities nurses have.
    No you can't prevent all medication errors, but creating a working environment that enables nurses to do their jobs is one place to start, instead of criticizing our professionalism because we no longer wear white dresses and caps. You'd never hear anyone criticizing lawyers and judges for their lack of professionalism because they do not wear powdered wigs. I found it interesting that workload issues, staffing ratios, acuity, continual interruptions, etc were not even mentioned. Gee folks, instead of treating the nurses like maids, allow them to do their job.

    Your right most people are just ignorant to what the responsiblities of a nurse are. Too bad neither Dr. Snyderman or Matt Laur took the opportunity to have a nurse explain that.
  7. by   SillyLilly
    As a patient and a nurse, a few months ago i found myself asking housekeeping for some medicine while in the hospital.... because there were no uniformed scrubs....

    Recently (yesterday) I was hired as a new nurse, and all the nurses on the floor wear white. Bleeeccchhh!

    But, the other job I was thinking about taking, everyone wore wine, which i HATE, even more than white.

    As long as no one takes my picture, Ill be ok...

    So, my point is, yes, it would be easier to differentiate (for some) if each position wore a similar color. I do not see how it would help other wise, and certainly not enough of a big deal to be talked about on the today show.....


    Also, I really wish I could read the actual interview, but the links arent working.....
  8. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    If i were ever to go back to a med-surg floor or LTC nursiing, i'd probably opt for the white shirt, navy pants, white shoes and socks combo. One, it wouldn't be hard to pick out what to wear. Two, the navy pants would avoid that hey-look-it's-my-underwear problem that can happen with white pants.

    Somehting like this:

    The pants, only they would be in Navy


    The shirt, in White (minus the embroidery)


    However, neither of those items of clothing would prevent me from making med errors lol.
  9. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    Quote from mercyteapot
    Wow, and here we've been all along thinking the keys to preventing medical errors were things like safe ratios, adequate training and supervision, staffing levels that ensure no one is forced to come in and work while sick, etc. and it turns out that all along the problem has been our SCRUBS! I don't know about anyone else, but I sure feel silly!!!
    LOL
  10. by   shodobe
    I think most of you are missing the point.This is not a fashion show and yes, patients STILL have problems distinguishing who is who no matter where you work. It seems most are more concerned about how they look for the day instead of how they are going to act and be percieved by the public. I guess some of you think your professionalism is going to ooze from your pores and a gentle glow will envelope you saying, here I am your NURSE!. It isn't going to happen. I have been in this game for almost 30 years and go to the floors to get patients and STILL can't tell the nurses from the aides because of the way they act not how they look! The rudest thing you can do is walk up to someone, grab their nametag, look at it and say, "OH, your the nurse taking care of so and so"! I do not advocate going back to whites, even though it might help, but people should understand that getting up in the morning to go to work shouldn't include how "cute" they are going to look for their shift. This is just my two cents worth, probably only one cent now, so have at it.
  11. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    I got the point just fine, 9 pages ago. I was simply elaborating on the clothing issue alone.
  12. by   Altra
    Quote from shodobe
    I think most of you are missing the point.This is not a fashion show and yes, patients STILL have problems distinguishing who is who no matter where you work. It seems most are more concerned about how they look for the day instead of how they are going to act and be percieved by the public. I guess some of you think your professionalism is going to ooze from your pores and a gentle glow will envelope you saying, here I am your NURSE!. It isn't going to happen. I have been in this game for almost 30 years and go to the floors to get patients and STILL can't tell the nurses from the aides because of the way they act not how they look! The rudest thing you can do is walk up to someone, grab their nametag, look at it and say, "OH, your the nurse taking care of so and so"! I do not advocate going back to whites, even though it might help, but people should understand that getting up in the morning to go to work shouldn't include how "cute" they are going to look for their shift. This is just my two cents worth, probably only one cent now, so have at it.
    I respect your opinion. However, frankly, yes I do think my professionalism "oozes from my pores" when I assess my patient competently, titrate their meds appropriately, educate them, constantly reprioritize the needs of all of my patients, use the sixth sense I'm developing to anticipate when things are going to go badly, and play mediator when docs & patients/families are not communicating adequately.

    Having said that, I do believe there are some firm limits - visible tattoos & piercings, excessive jewelry, or any tummy or cleavage exposure is absolutely unacceptable, in my view. But in my town, on football Sundays, you'll find everyone from docs to dietary in their game shirts.
  13. by   Elisheva
    Don't know how to achieve it, but I do wish there was a separate and distinquishable "look" for the nurse.

    Go ahead, flame me for it, but I wore all whites 10 years ago. Often, I wore white dress uniforms, even - oh, yes, I'll say it, the hose! No cap, though. Maybe it was just my imagination or my "legend in my own self-important mind", but I felt I commanded more respect - not because my uniform was white - but because patients knew who and what I was!

    There's something to be said for a uniform and a polished look: policemen know it, the military knows it. It says I belong to a group of professionals who had to pay a price to get where they are.

    Shoot me. I liked it.

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