The Today Show - page 6

Anyone watch this morning? Their medical expert was on giving tips to patients on how to prevent errors while they are in the hospital. One thing she mentioned was that hospitals (nurses especially)... Read More

  1. by   Retired R.N.
    Quote from TheCommuter
    Never in a million years will I wear an all-white uniform. They're too much of an inconvenience since they have the tendency to become dirty very quickly.
    What ever gave you that idea? A white uniform doesn't get dirty any faster than any other color. The old-fashioned nurses' uniforms were 100% cotton and designed to withstand washing in hot water and treatment with chlorine bleach. The starch gave a nice smooth finish that did not irritate tender skin.

    As for the white caps being difficult to keep clean, ours opened out flat, then went into the laundry with the uniforms. Instead of the ordinary starching and ironing, they were simply dipped into a very thick starch solution and "pasted" onto a smooth surface like a mirror or a refrigerator door to dry. Our stripes were then "glued" to the clean dry caps with KY jelly.
  2. by   RN34TX
    Quote from penguin2
    I wear my name tag, the doctors do NOT- and patients are forever confusing me w/one particular surgeon-- as IF she'd be at their bedside in the PACU for more than 30 seconds. Puleeze. I've also had surgeons walk into the PACU & not even recognize their patients that they just operated on. What I love is when a doctor walks in to visit a patient wearing scrubs, and the patient in the other bed asks for a bed pan or a pain med, and what does the Dr. say? "I'll go get the nurse." Patients also assume every MALE nurse is a Dr.-- even when we all wore white. I'd say this surgeon needs to look at her own profession-- as they say- "if you spot it you've got it"!
    As a PACU RN, I loved those comments and can totally relate! I laughed so hard reading your post!

    As a male RN in PACU, I am frequently mistaken for a surgeon by the patients as well.
    "So how did everything go, doc? What did you find in there?" or "Are you the doctor who operated on me?"

    And I'd be thinking the same as you......As IF your surgeon would actually be standing at your bedside waiting for you to wake up to reassure you and tell you how everything went, or God forbid turn you on your side and hand you a basin if you are getting sick while your nurse gets an anti-emetic out of the Pyxis!
    No ma'am!
  3. by   shodobe
    I hate to say this but I did agree with some points the MD on the Today show said. Nursing in general is getting waaaaay to laid back. I started out 30 years ago when the nurses were required to wear their hats and we all wore white! I don't really like the idea of white again and definitely the ladies do not need the hats, but when you can't tell aides from nurses and housekeeping from aides there is definitely a problem to be addressed. I have worked in the OR for the past 29 years so attire isn't an issue. I go up to the floors and everyone is dressed in every color of the rainbow you can't really tell who's who. I know people say, "the patient can just read my nametag". This has been an issue also for a long time whether you want certain patients knowing your last name, especially Pysch units. Older patients seem to be able to distinguish color better than able to read the small print on a nametag. This issue has been brought up in the past with older threads and one I can remember had all departments wearing different colors so when a patient was asked who gave them a procedure, information or whatever they could state, " I can't remember the name but they were wearing such and such a color". Easy to tell what department they were from. I know white is out as well as the caps, but casual Fridays can go only so far, especially when it is every day of the week.
  4. by   bklynborn
    I read a post here not long ago about a gal who said she was going to experiment with wearing white to see if it made a difference. If you are out there come back and let us know how it went.
  5. by   midcom
    I had to join in on the conversation but apoligize that I have not read all the previous postings.
    I fell in love with nursing because of the shoes, uniforms, & most of all the caps. However, that was 51 years ago & I was 4 years old at the time. I have gotten over that love affair. I am now about to start nursing school FINALLY, & am thrilled that I won't be wearing a cap or a startched white uniform. But I agree that the present lack of uniformity, is confusing to patients & family members. My sister was a patient in a large magnet hospital this summer for several weeks. It was impossible to tell the respiratory therapists, nurses, or CNAs apart by their atire & we often asked questions that could not be answered by that person, nursing questions to a RT, etc. My sister was very sick & once she was moved out of ICU, often I had to find the nurse. Several times I wasted lots of time trying to figure out who was a nurse. Heck, it was hard to tell some of the doctors from the nurses! Their nametags didn't help much as it often was impossible to see them much less read them.
    It seems to me that it would be so much easier all around if each profession had something to make them distinct, be it color or whatever. They do it for school. I'll be wearing a navy polo & white uniform pants (not scrubs, my teachers informed me). Another school has their own uniforms. There will be no problem differentiating us from "real" nurses.
    Dixie
  6. by   gitterbug
    I wore all white for years, liked going to colors and prints, but still have all white in the bunch. Cap is gone but will wear one if instructed, afterall, I went to school for them and was very proud to wear it. Truth is, the public does not like change, facilities want to push to blame on us for wanting a little choice in uniform. Truthfully, do you think TPTB will staff floors and units better if RN's wear all white? If that is the case then I will wear white. Would love to go back to being staffed adequately.
  7. by   Fiona59
    I wear all white about twice every two weeks (dress, hose, shoes, or a pantsuit). I actually find that patients are politer, less demanding, in general, better behaved.

    Why, I don't know. But the older people will always say its nice to "see a nurse".

    Oh, and I have a far harder time getting stains out of blue for some reason than I do white.

    Never tried wearing the cap, although there are a few at my hospital that still come in as a "full dressed nurse; dress, hose, shoes, cap" and they've told me they never get a hard time from the patient or the family.

    Maybe stereotypes bring authority, who knows.
  8. by   Antikigirl
    I really do feel it is a age thing too. My younger pts love the scrubs and don't seem to mind us not wearing white! In fact, we have a nurse that wears the full dress whites with cap and find her to be starchy and old fashioned (no offence at all...I don't, but my younger pts have said so).

    Were as the older pts tend to do just the opposite. They find scrubs to be far to casual, and want the "disaplined" (as I hear a few pts say) uniforms.

    Mid age I find a mix! But typically more understanding of either.

    Oh well I say...I wear scubs and am a darned great nurse...so if you judge me by my uniform I choose to wear, well that is their choice...I will still give great service and care either way .

    Would I wear whites or a cap? NO!!!!!!!!!! Never was my thing really, I highly respect it, but just not me by any means (I actually look sick in white...all pale and brings out dark circles under my eyes...I never wear white). Heck, my pts call me NURSE _____ and I love it...they don't have trouble knowing who I am!
  9. by   billaboo
    I agree that mistakes will not be affected by our clothes...interesting.
    However, I think the real problem is not nurses being dressed too casual but the fact that EVERYONE wears scrubs now. Even at my childrens schools...the lunch ladies wear scrubs. I did work at a hospital where they color coordinated job title by scrub colors. Each position had a few color options...ie. RN wears green, purple, and navy. However, I think only staff knew that fact!
    Tricia
  10. by   jemtown
    Our facility just went to a dress code for all RNs. The majority of the uniform is either black or white. It makes the students stand out as we are in all blue. No matter what you're wearing though there's always the potential for errors. TV shows like Today leave a lot to be desired for getting information out to the public-how good can it be if you only have 2 minutes to say it all?
  11. by   jb2u
    Quote from Fiona59
    Why, I don't know. But the older people will always say its nice to "see a nurse".

    Oh, and I have a far harder time getting stains out of blue for some reason than I do white.
    When I worked as a CNA in a nursing home I had to wear all white and the residents did not like it. They thought that it looked too "institutional" and I agree.

    As far as the stains, Yes, they come out, but I've had to work many shifts at the nursing home with tea, resident's coffee, pee, and poop on my uniform for the whole shift. If I had on dark blue, no one would have known, but with whites, I have to explain what happened to everyone so they wouldn't think that I was just some unwashed slob. When you constantly have residents spilling food, spitting food, knee deep in poop, etc...it really is hard to keep those whites white while ON Shift.

    When it comes to respect/perception, I feel that if you carry yourself as a professional and do not allow pts to belittle you then the respect will follow. Yes, some people will disrespect Nurses no matter how professional you are OR how white your uniform is, but for the most part, scrubs are a part of the profession now and if they are ironed, fit properly, and clean, then they are acceptable. I agree that no one should come to work unkempt or wearing "low riders" or half shirts, but to say scrubs in general are unprofessional is incorrect. They are now a part of the profession. Time changes, things change. I don't think we should stand at attention when a Doctor walks onto the floor, I don't think that men should be excluded from military nursing, I don't think Nurses should wash windows, and I don't think that Nurses should have to wear all white or a Hat!
    Yes, time changes and sometimes for the better.
  12. by   Jenny67
    I was watching the Today show a couple weeks ago and a specialist was talking about Dr's offices and telling people that in this day and time there is no good reason for a person to have to wait to see the doctor..

    When I got to work that morning I told my Dr about it who laughed and made the comment that he must not be working in Family Practice.

    Seriously, the reason why patients end up having to wait is simple:

    1. There truly is an emergency situation because a patient is having a heart attack and decided to drive to the office vs the hospital because they feel safer with their doctor.

    2. Patient walks in because he has just about cut his hand off and it was quicker to come to you than drive to the hospital.

    Okay seriously now--

    Too many of our patients arrive past their scheduled time and too many patients have a long list of everything they want to cover during this appointment..
  13. by   PANurseRN1
    Quote from midcom
    I had to join in on the conversation but apoligize that I have not read all the previous postings.
    I fell in love with nursing because of the shoes, uniforms, & most of all the caps. However, that was 51 years ago & I was 4 years old at the time. I have gotten over that love affair. I am now about to start nursing school FINALLY, & am thrilled that I won't be wearing a cap or a startched white uniform. But I agree that the present lack of uniformity, is confusing to patients & family members. My sister was a patient in a large magnet hospital this summer for several weeks. It was impossible to tell the respiratory therapists, nurses, or CNAs apart by their atire & we often asked questions that could not be answered by that person, nursing questions to a RT, etc. My sister was very sick & once she was moved out of ICU, often I had to find the nurse. Several times I wasted lots of time trying to figure out who was a nurse. Heck, it was hard to tell some of the doctors from the nurses! Their nametags didn't help much as it often was impossible to see them much less read them.
    It seems to me that it would be so much easier all around if each profession had something to make them distinct, be it color or whatever. They do it for school. I'll be wearing a navy polo & white uniform pants (not scrubs, my teachers informed me). Another school has their own uniforms. There will be no problem differentiating us from "real" nurses.
    Dixie
    What are facilites supposed to do...make some sort of announcement in the pt. handbook that says who wears what color? We're not schoolchildren, and I hate that comparison.

    There is no reason for housekeeping, dietary, etc. to wear scubs. Sometimes I wonder if it's the hospitals' way of giving the appearance of having more nurses than they actually do.

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