The Today Show - page 4

Anyone watch this morning? Their medical expert was on giving tips to patients on how to prevent errors while they are in the hospital. One thing she mentioned was that hospitals (nurses especially)... Read More

  1. by   flashpoint
    I don't see how wearing white is going to make us more professional...sure it will make us easier to spot, but it won't make me a better nurse. It might make me a little more hesitant to "get my hands dirty." I spent half an hour crawling on the floor looking for something a resident dropped last week...don't think I would be so willing to do that in white. I've said this a million times, but I thik we need to get all non-medical staff out of scrubs. Housekeepers do not need to wear scrubs...dietary does not need to wear scrubs...the receptionist does not need to wear scrubs. And what exactly do caps do? I had to wear one in nursing school and sure, it looked kind of sharp, but it didn't keep may hair under control or anything and it got knocked off when I held little kids or hit it against something.

    There are a lot of things that need improved in health care, but it always seems to fall back on the nurses. The hospital I worked for blamed everything on the nurses...the IT manager left his computer on one weekend...some how a little fire started...who got blamed? The nurses...we should have somehow known, even though his office is always locked and isn't anywhere near where patient care areas are.
  2. by   DusktilDawn
    i think the today show could have better served the public than they did:
    make sure you see the surgeon
    definately patients should be encouraged to see and talk to their doctors, especially before being given sedatives pre-op. what wasn't addressed in this piece was encouraging people to write a list of concerns and questions prior to talking to the doctor. i can't tell you how many times the physician has just left the unit and the patient/or family has a question they forgot to address while the physician was in the room.

    marking no on the side that is not being operated on
    bad idea to suggest marking a body part not being operated on prior to surgery on their own, period. as others have stated, marking other limbs not to be affected may add to confusion, especially if they decide to take dr. snyderman's suggestion further and do it on their own. having patients inquire about pre-op check lists that ensure correct procedure on the correct limb is a better suggestion. having patients insist that they and their surgeon sign or mark the surgical limb together is a another good idea.

    medication errors
    interesting how they mention illegible writing on the physician's part, but offer no solutions to this problem, and yes this is a serious issue. how about pharmacies, nurses, hospitals, and other health care facilities insisting on computerized/or typed scripts or refusing to process illegible scripts. also encouraging patients to ask what meds they are receiving. what about encouraging patients to keep an updated list on them at all times in regards to medications and allergies, easily done on a piece of paper or a card that can be kept in their wallets right beside their health cards/credit cards, sin, birth cert, etc. encouraging patients to educate themselves on the medications they are taking, even requesting printed information from their pharmacy or health care provider. i'm baffled at the number of people who don't even know why they are on a medication. personally, i always tell the patient what medications i am giving them, it allows them the opportunity to ask questions. when a patient mentions a deviation from their normal dose or questions the appropriateness of a medication, i take that as a cue to double check again the orders and doses. no mention of not interrupting the nursing staff when they are dispensing medication.

    infection control
    yes, they did discuss handwashing, but how about emphasing that it is one of the most important barriers within a hospital to prevent infection. i do agree with advocating for all who come in contact with the patient washing their hands, including visitors. how about if you are visiting the hospital to see family, that you do not actively display any signs of illness or infection. what about limiting visitor numbers and encouraging compliance with that. what about private rooms.

    utilizing er
    at least they mentioned how ers are being used inappropriately by the public and that they bear some responsiblity for this. i wish they would have mentioned that patients try to be as clear and concise as possible when describing their symptoms during triage. though dr. snyderman doesn't feel er is a place to be polite, i don't advocate for rudeness, in fact that suggestion may do more harm than good. i've always told patients to be proactive and insistant if they feel something is wrong that is not being addressed.

    professionalism
    i personally felt the cap remark was inappropriate and gender biased. sorry, i felt it encouraged an antiquated stereotype. although it is not a problem at the facility i work at distinqishing nurses from other staff, it can be a problem at other facilities. i don't think scrubs should be worn by non-nursing staff. i do think that every person when entering the room should introduce themselves and explain who they are and why they are there:
    "hello, i'm ray and i'm an rn. i will be providing your medications and..."
    "hello, i'm tammy and i'm a pt and i will be...."
    "hello i'm terry and i'm a housekeeper and i will be cleaning your room today..."

    encourage patients to ask for explainations in regards to the different roles. encourage patients to know who their nurse is for the shift, and to treat them as professionals instead of maids.
  3. by   parrotmom
    I agree with no scrubs for ancillary pesonnel. There is no reason for a receptionist/dietary person/housekeeper or transport tech to be in scrubs. A hospital near hee provides polo shirts for these employees which they wear with slacks or in housekeepings case they allow them to wear cotton pants as well. I do not think the majority of people think that putting a white dress and a cap will improve their care but I do believe they ae upset by the casualness of some peoples dress for work. I know many physicians offices as well as clinic that do not allow the cartoon and animation scrubs except in pedi care and do not allow the new capri scrubs which I think are bordering on unprofesional. Capris can not be construed as business attire unless you are selling beach property. Of course I am offended by bank tellers who wear shirts that belong in a night club or people who wear tank tops to work anywhere but a gym or a beach. JMO
  4. by   flashpoint
    Sometimes I think that the experts just need to push an emphasis on common sense. Ask questions...know what medication you are taking...know your diagnosis and research it...know the members of your healthcare team...etc. I think a lot of the "experts" make doctors and nurses out to be the bad guys...patients walk in to the clinic or hospital expecting mistakes, expecting to be ignored, mistreated, misdiagnosed, expecting something bad to happen. Too bad they can emphasize how much training we have, how much experience we have, what excellent resources we have when we need more information...
  5. by   tridil2000
    how many of you shake your patient's hand when introducing yourself?? i can almost guarantee that your pts will treat you with more respect if you shake their hand upon introduction.
  6. by   Elisheva
    Quote from parrotmom
    Of course I am offended by bank tellers who wear shirts that belong in a night club or people who wear tank tops to work anywhere but a gym or a beach. JMO
    Funny you should say that! I went to the bank last week and the teller was wearing a shirt that was so low-cut that I thought she might have a pole beside her window. Cover up, for Pete's sake.
  7. by   PANurseRN1
    I'll go back to wearing a cap when Matt goes back to having hair.
  8. by   jonear2
    Anybody else wondering why on earth the Today Show didn't have a nurse on the program to talk about medication errors and ways to prevent them??? No, because we all know that a high priced physician who nevers passes a single med during the day is ssooooo much more qualified to answer those questions. How about a nurse who has done research regarding the topic and perhaps has been published in NJN? You mean there are nurses who do research??? What are these "nursing journals" of which you speak?
  9. by   jahra
    Quote from LisaRn21
    Hi

    I was not disrespecting or degrading anyone. I was simply stating, if someone decides to demand I wear certain clothes especially a hat on my head I would quit. I don't feel the nurses who have worked over the years helped advance nursing to the profession it is today because of the clothes they wear... it was the caring nature, and the assertiveness. Please don't degrade me for having an opinion .. thank you
    As a nurse who has family members (nurses) who helped change nursing
    to a profession that has included placing entry level at the
    university level, my point is to honor those who have gone before you.
    I respectfully disagree. To many nurses, they were proud to wear
    a nursing cap. The caring nature and assertiveness was present while
    they wore a distinguished uniform they earned and the public respected. During the Depression, it was difficult for many
    individuals to get an education. My aunt who graduated
    during that time, gave me one of her old caps as a gift.
    It was one of her treasured possessions. She asked me to
    give her one of mine when I graduated.


    My statement was- please do not degrade the nursing cap by referring
    to it as a marshmellow. It is degrading to those of us who have
    earned them and worn them.

    Apology accepted.
    Last edit by jahra on Sep 21, '06
  10. by   mcleanl
    I have to agree with some of the other posts....I don't think the she was saying that nurses should go back to wearing caps but simply that it was a way to distinguish nurses from other hospital personal. I have to agree (and I am not some old prude by any stretch) that there are plenty of nurses that need to dress more appropriately. I see low-ride scrubs with thongs hanging out and short shirts that expose bellies when arms are raised, multiple piercings and some nurses that bathe in perfume before they come to work. I graduated in '94 and I have seen things change a lot in that short time. And what about all the mile long fake finger nails??
    I do think that nurses need to be in scrubs (and no, not white ones).
    Someone earlier made a good point....why is dietary and house keeping etc. now wearing scrubs. Scrubs are traditionally worn by patient care givers...so I can see how this would be confusing.
  11. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    Someone should have reminded ol' Nanc that this is 2006, not 1966.

    I'm also noticing that the public figures that advocate for the hat, are typically people that don't wear one (unless it's the cap of self-entitlement).
  12. by   LisaRn21
    Quote from jahra
    As a nurse who has family members (nurses) who helped change nursing
    to a profession that has included placing entry level at the
    university level, my point is to honor those who have gone before you.
    I respectfully disagree. To many nurses, they were proud to wear
    a nursing cap. The caring nature and assertiveness was present while
    they wore a distinguished uniform they earned and the public respected. During the Depression, it was difficult for many
    individuals to get an education. My aunt who graduated
    during that time, gave me one of her old caps as a gift.
    It was one of her treasured possessions. She asked me to
    give her one of mine when I graduated.


    My statement was- please do not degrade the nursing cap by referring
    to it as a marshmellow. It is degrading to those of us who have
    earned them and worn them.

    Apology accepted.
    This is the last time I will defend my post. I am entitled to an opinion and I said I would not wear a cap, and the marshmellow comment ... was about wearing all white not the cap. and no one apologized...however I will apologize that you took my post the wrong way not for what I wrote
  13. by   annmariern
    I was once in the middle of a code doing chest compressions when the nurse supervisor asked someone to relieve me; I thought either she was being kind or I was doing something wrong. She pulled me aside and told me to go and fix my hat that had gone askew!!!! No not the 1920's, early 80's in the UK. But have to say, those caps were much respected. And an impractical item...they have largely abandoned them now.

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