The solution to nursing problems

  1. I posted this before and it seems to have been lost.

    I think we can corrent all of the major problems in nursing by simply having all of us take the same day off. Let's say February 11th, 2003, all nurses on duty go home and no, I repeat no nurse comes into work that day. This would include all LPNS, RNs, ADNs, BSNs, MSNs, and RN/Phds. Exactly 24 hours later we return to work and see have some meaningful discussion with the powers in charge.
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  2. 121 Comments

  3. by   SmilingBluEyes
    very interesting suggestion, indeed. i am afraid it will come to that one day, the way things are degenerating in health care, but i am not sure nurses across this country are ready for that magnitude step yet. i, for one,would be all for it.
  4. by   sjoe
    It would have to last for a week before making a major dent. IMHO. Sounds good to me.
  5. by   deespoohbear
    Count me in!!! I have always said that if all the nurses would stick together we would be able to get more done to advance our profession.
  6. by   Dazedgiggle
    Something like this would certainly show unity among nurses.....I'm in!
  7. by   Youda
    I'd like to see a Nurses March on Washington. As many nurses as possible show up and draw public attention and the media to the problems. Maybe have an old fashioned, hippy inspired sit-in at all the state capitols on the same day across the nation (old hippy here).

    I totally agree with you Dave. We need some kind of major, major vocal and very public and visible protest.
  8. by   suni
    we need action so each of us should try to inspire our co-workers to show solidarity and have a major sick out nationally
  9. by   James Huffman
    Before agreeing to such a tactic, the following questions should be answered, in detail.

    1. What are the problems nurses would be wanting to address?

    2. What would constitute a successful resolution of those problems?

    3. Who would be able to solve those problems?

    4. What time frame would those doing the protest consider acceptable for resolving the issue?

    5. What answer would we as nurses give to the public regarding those patients who would die as a result of such an action?

    Jim Huffman, RN

    www.NetworkforNurses.com
  10. by   FTell001
    I see everyone scurrying to resolve the dockworkers strike in California...the president to address the problem!
    I think the only way nurses will get any response to our work conditions is to have a "walk out". Maybe our concerns will be addressed instead of replacing us with imported nurses!
    Count me IN!
  11. by   -jt
    We had a Nurses March on Washington, DC for pt care in 1995 & 1996 that closed down Pennsylvania Ave in downtown DC at lunchtime rush hr traffic - but it didnt even get on the 6pm news. The first time, 35,000 nurses came from all across the country, including Alaska & Hawaii - in their caps, white uniforms & even the old navy blue Florence capes.

    It was a great energerizing day, even if the news did black it out. Maybe its time again & maybe this time more of the 2.7 million nurses in this country would be willing to fund it & show up for it.

    As for walking out of work en mass, I doubt that can happen. If youre on duty, you cant leave till the end of your, but if none of the next shift comes in & there is no one to turn the pts over to, you cant leave at all. The only ones to feel the crunch from nurses not coming to work would be the nurses who were stuck there because Mandatory OT would be instituted for this "emergency" & you either stay & do it or lose your license with a charge of pt abandonment. Need a better plan.
  12. by   Youda
    Originally posted by -jt
    We had a Nurses March on Washington, DC for pt care in 1995 & 1996 that closed down Pennsylvania Ave in downtown DC at lunchtime rush hr traffic - but it didnt even get on the 6pm news.
    I didn't even know that had happened!
    The next time, it can't be about our patients. It has to be about US! The working conditions, the treatment, mandatory OT, short-staffing, no benefits anymore, yearly "pay cuts", the abuse, etc. Heck, I have a friend who went to a one year vo-tech program, became an electrician, and makes about double what I make. My car mechanic makes more than I do. The plumber, the accountants, etc. And everyone has better benefits, retirement plans (what's that?), professional respect . . . But, if one of their hearts stops beating, or they get the flu, who takes care of them? Me.
  13. by   -jt
    <Maybe have an old fashioned, hippy inspired sit-in at all the state capitols on the same day across the nation (old hippy here).>

    State Nurses Associations all across the country hold all kinds of rallies, protests, & lobby days for RNs at their state capitols throughout every year, some simultaneously during Nurses Week. Why not contact yours with your suggestion for the next one & get the ball rolling. It sounds like fun.


    <I think the only way nurses will get any response to our work conditions is to have a "walk out".>

    We're already having a "walk out" - we arent staying in or taking the job at all. AND we're telling everybody why & what they have to do to get us back. So are they doing any of those things? Most are just shrugging their shoulders & running off to the Phillipines to replace us. If you have a "walk out" for a day... the pts are put at risk.... the nurses who are there the night before are stuck there for the rest of the day..... & then what happens?

    The only way any change is going to come about is if more of us get into the politics & the legislation & the law making of it all. Forget the employers. Hound your LEGISLATORS with the facts & demand they give us the laws we need to improve our jobs - laws that the employers will have to comply with.
    Last edit by -jt on Oct 8, '02
  14. by   -jt
    <I didn't even know that had happened!>

    Most of the country didnt know it happened. But it happened. It was at the time when RNs were being downsized & laid off in masses. RNs, LPNs, aides, & MDs marched for nurses & pts care. The point was that what was happening to nurses at the time was affecting pts too (just like it is now). Anyway it was a great day, put together, handled & produced by Laura Gasparis, RN, and supported by RN unions, healthcare worker unions, the state nurses associations, & the ANA - who all promoted the event & got their members there - and some MDs & MD unions even paricipated. A lot of politicians started paying attention. At first there was just a few who agreed to speak at the rally, but when they all saw the size of the crowd streaming to the Capitol, those politicians who had said NO were falling all over themselves changing their minds & asking for a chance to be seen & heard with the nurses. After the rally, we had appointments with our own legislators in their offices to discuss our issues. We could have had 2.7 million RNs there but we only had 35,000 RNs & healthcare workers & still the impact was immense.

    Imagine if more RNs had gotten invloved?

    There was a video made of this day & its available for purchase or you can see a preview of it online:

    >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
    "NURSES GREATEST DAY - Video Of The Nurses March On DC!

    Nurses Week 1995

    35,000 nurses strong fill Pennsylvania Ave. from the Capitol to the White House. They went to the Nation's Capitol to make the public aware of the concerns nurses have for their patients. Relive this historic event. Forty-Five minutes that include all major events and speakers. You may even see yourself, if you were there!"

    preview this video at
    http://www.greatnurses.com/Videos.html
    >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
    Last edit by -jt on Oct 8, '02

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