The math doesn't add up - pg.3 | allnurses

The math doesn't add up - page 3

I'm a math person, so it really bothers me when my manager asks us to do an additional task or duty without subtracting a current task or duty. The math doesn't add up. Our current duties take up... Read More

  1. Visit  noyesno profile page
    0
    Quote from MoopleRN
    While other posters address the thank you cards in your example (said cards should be renamed the letmekissyourbuttocksonemoretimebeforeyoufilloutyo urcustomersatisfactionsurvey, btw), let's look at the math, you math person you! Math has nothing to do with nursing in a 12 or 8 hr shift. Jane Doe needs 14 minutes to waste your time on Mon, on Tues, she needs 22. A new duty of stocking towels needs 3 minutes per pt IF you have the time at all/remember and give a crap enough to actually do that. Point is, there's too many variables for the math to EVER add up.

    You're real point, I think, is that we're too busy putting out fires to satisfy the demands put on us by ppl in management who don't currently/haven't ever done our job (and if so, I agree!). In the nameofStudorweprayamen.
    Excellent points MoopleRN. Me gusta.
  2. Visit  samadams8 profile page
    8
    Quote from mercurysmom
    Hmmm, a personal "thank you" note from the nurse at discharge? The way I used to write "Thanks!" and drew a smiley face on the bill, topped with a few mints, the way I did eons ago when working as a waitress? What exactly are we looking for in terms of a reaction from the patient, a tip?
    Yes, I'm sorry, but this is strange. Now if the hospital wants to send home a brochure that says, "Thank you for using THUS AND SUCH HEALTH SYSTEM, that's great. What does that have to do with nurses sending out thank you notes to their patients? Are physicians and social workers doing this?

    I think this has reached the point of ridiculousness.
  3. Visit  samadams8 profile page
    2
    Quote from CheesePotato
    Aaaaaaand that little "must do" would effectively spell the end of CheesePotato's nursing career. Really. Because my mind immediately went to the following chestnut:

    "Dear Gentleman of 513B--

    That we stand here on the cusp of your release from the hospital to long term intensive care, I would like to take this time to reflect on our time together and offer heartfelt thanks.

    Thank you so much for not only drinking and driving but going that extra mile for excellence and bringing it all home with a well placed, "LOL U no it buddyz" text that effectively helped you flip your car across a four lane expressway. I mean, I really didn't need sleep anyway, so getting called out at two AM to flood you with blood products, realign your pelvis, both femurs, your tibia, ulna, place a couple chest tubes and rex open a bit of your skull was exactly what I needed. Let us not forget the vomit and blood on my shoes and scrubs to the point it saturated my undergarments. I had been meaning to swap them out anyway.

    Oh, and those other two that suffered from your awesomeness? Yeah, that just made my night way fantastic.

    Ah yes, memories.

    Thank you. Truly. Thank you.

    Love and snuggles,

    ~~CP~~"

    Can you say terminated?

    For the life of me, I will never understand management. Last year they wanted us to start verbally thanking patients for "allowing us to participate in their care". Really? You flipped your ATV while high as a kite. This is not really a highlight in my world right now, thank you.

    But, may I suggest writing out a few quick fill form letters and having them placed on rubber stamps? Think of the time you will save while meeting your quota of thank you letters!

    Cheers,

    ~~CP~~

    P.S.

    A certain Lemur mentioned something about a Thank You note meme and after I got done coughing my gum back up out of my lung, I decided that was a splendid idea. Give me a day to get it all ironed out, but it will be a sister blog to my current one *see my profile for details. All credit goes to Lemur for something that is pure hilarity and genius. ::salutes::


    noyesno and opossum like this.
  4. Visit  samadams8 profile page
    3
    Quote from MsBruiser
    Welcome to healthcare. The only way to escape that nonsense is to leave patient care. Innovation in nursing is usually the creation of more needless work or another useless form.

    Thank you notes to patients from nurses is innovative? Wow. As I said, let the hospital send it with their brochure.

    As a patient, I'd prefer excellent care and the personal interaction that comes with a genuine "Best to you and fare-thee-well" or a genuinely caring follow-up call.

    You can take certain things a bit far. Is this reallly something for which we should kill more trees?

    IDK. Sounds like a SNL skit. Pt in wheelchair at hospital door and nurse across from pt. The exchange goes like this. Pt: "Thank you." Nurse: "No. Thank you." Pt: "No. Thank You..." ad infinitum...
    martinalpn, noyesno, and opossum like this.
  5. Visit  tewdles profile page
    15
    The thank you notes/cards need to come from the hospital administration, not the bedside nurses, IMHO.
    IowaKaren, not.done.yet, SleeepyRN, and 12 others like this.
  6. Visit  wooh profile page
    17
    Can't we just be like flight attendants instead, stand at the front door, "Buh-bye. Buh-bye. Buh-bye. Buh-bye..."
  7. Visit  BostonTerrierLoverRN profile page
    2
    ...do we get to hand out Chocolate Mints with the Hospital Logo too?

    @wooh, at least they got people too stop calling them "stewardess!" Maybe there's a shot we can go from "Hey you," "you there," and "excuse me- Com' mere" to just "nurse," lol!
    Last edit by BostonTerrierLoverRN on Dec 9, '12
    Firestarter_RN and wooh like this.
  8. Visit  SwansonRN profile page
    3
    The idea of nurses taking the time to write thank you notes is both infuriating and hilarious. How about your welcome notes?

    The unit clerks on our unit write sympathy cards to the families of our patients that die. We average 45 deaths/month, so I bet that can get time consuming, I wouldn't be surprised if that task were to fall on nursing staff soon, too.
    monkeybug, noyesno, and opossum like this.
  9. Visit  trueblue2000 profile page
    0
    I don't see the big deal. How long does it take to sign a card? 5 seconds? You have five patients per day and adding 25 seconds to your daily "math" is going to break the camel's back? It is OK to refuse to sign it on principle (like, thanking them for what exactly, they should be thanking me!) but complaining because it adds to your work load seems unreasonable to me. And seriously fellow nurses, patients do have choices when choosing a hospital and while we complain about patients it is only because of them that we have a paycheck. No patients = no jobs.
  10. Visit  BlueDevil,DNP profile page
    9
    Well then how about refusing just on principle because it is colossally stupid? I agree, the patients should be thanking the nurses, not the other way around. It's preposterous. If the hospital wants to send thank you notes, they should come from the administration. I wouldn't do it either, or, I'd sign silly fake names.
  11. Visit  netglow profile page
    2
    Quote from trueblue2000
    I don't see the big deal. How long does it take to sign a card? 5 seconds? You have five patients per day and adding 25 seconds to your daily "math" is going to break the camel's back? It is OK to refuse to sign it on principle (like, thanking them for what exactly, they should be thanking me!) but complaining because it adds to your work load seems unreasonable to me. And seriously fellow nurses, patients do have choices when choosing a hospital and while we complain about patients it is only because of them that we have a paycheck. No patients = no jobs.
  12. Visit  wooh profile page
    14
    Quote from trueblue2000
    I don't see the big deal. How long does it take to sign a card? 5 seconds? You have five patients per day and adding 25 seconds to your daily "math" is going to break the camel's back?
    Added to task A that only takes 30 seconds per patient x5 (haha! only 5 patients!)
    Plus task B from last month that only takes 15 seconds per patient x #patients
    Plus task C from 3 weeks ago that only takes 10 minutes x #patients
    Plus task D from 2 weeks ago that only takes 2 minutes x #patients
    Plus task E from last week that only takes 3 minutes x #patients
    Plus next week's task F that only takes 5 minutes x # patients

    At some point the "only takes..." adds up. When EVERY week, heck, every shift, something that "only takes..." gets added, those little bits add up to a lot of time.

    And as someone that used to have to sign my name to those cards... You have to find the cards. You have to let people know when you run out of them. You have to make sure everyone else has signed it before you put it in the pile to be mailed. You have to put one in the designated spot when they get admitted. Look up the address to put on the card. All things that "only take" a few seconds here and there. But not only the time, but the aggravation that gets added on to any task that gets put on the to-do list is NEVER going to be smooth each and every time. There's always going to be the sticking points to cause added annoyance. And time that could be spent on something else, like patient care.
  13. Visit  BostonTerrierLoverRN profile page
    7
    The profession needs a "Reformation," where people realize we're not nuns, saints, or ego builders- we are here to save your butt(and wipe it sometimes)


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