Tattoos and nursing - page 6

Ok so I have a question. I am going to be starting school soon to be a LPN. My question is I have a pretty good sized tattoo on my left wrist. It isnt offensive, its very pretty. It is a... Read More

  1. by   BoiEMT
    I have quite a few tatoos all in places not able to be seen when wearing scrubs. I won't get a tatoo in a place that can be seen when I am at work. Some people disagree, but I think as long as it is in good taste and isn't the first thing that you notice about you, you should be ok.
  2. by   missy2b
    I don't have any tats, nor a desire to get one.

    They bother me less than my coworker who has had open sores on his arms for the past 7 years. . . at least the tats are healed! He doesn't wear gloves, either.
  3. by   babynurse223
    [font=book antiqua]i have 2 tattoos. one is a tribal sun on the outer aspect of my left foot and the other is music notes on my right hip. both are covered while i am at work. however, i am starting grad school this summer to pursue my masters and eventually work in either education or administration. i will have to wear skirts and professional attire and have a fear that while wearing heels, my foot tattoo will be visible and will be interpreted as unprofessional. what do you other nurses out there think?


    ps: as a response to the original post, i think tattoos are acceptable as long as they are tasteful and small. i see them as making a person an individual!:spin:
  4. by   Roy Fokker
    I'll make sure that in my last days on this earth, I get a "DNR" tattooed on my chest.
  5. by   classy gal
    As an experienced professional I want to give a warning against getting or showing any tattoos.

    It is 100% legal to discriminate against people with tattoos. Currently there are lawsuits in the works in the area of religious tattoos but so far the courts have not overruled previous decisions.

    For first responders, your employer can require you to list ALL scars or tattoos. It is a felony to lie. Often times for fire fighters they use a polygraph during the interview. In the extreme case of some city fire fighters they have a "swim test" where the point is not to test your swimming ability but to see if you have a disqualifying tattoo.

    Having a tattoo is more than a form of self expression, their meanings go back much longer. The word "stigma" has the Latin base of tattoo or to permanently stain. Only slaves or known criminals had tattoos and where given tattoos against their will. In todays society a majority of people do associate tattoos with criminal behavior and social deviance. It is a legitimate fear of a patient of contracting hep C from a worker.

    Having a visible tattoo can and will probably preclude you from achieving your potential as far as you career goes. So to all you in the lower echelons of nursing with visible arm/neck tattoos who dream of achieving more:trout:.

    My advice is to not get any. If you all ready have them, hide them and lie about them.
  6. by   notaclue
    I think patients are more concerned with you providing care - I don't think it would be offensive.
  7. by   KellNY
    Quote from classy gal
    In todays society a majority of people do associate tattoos with criminal behavior and social deviance. It is a legitimate fear of a patient of contracting hep C from a worker.

    Having a visible tattoo can and will probably preclude you from achieving your potential as far as you career goes. So to all you in the lower echelons of nursing with visible arm/neck tattoos who dream of achieving more:trout:.

    My advice is to not get any. If you all ready have them, hide them and lie about them.
    Wow. 1st, I'd like to see the research proving that which I bolded--I call BS. Same with the city fire fighter faux "swim test"-every single nyc fire fighter I've ever known (all 16 or so of them) has had at least one tattoo-either the badge with the ladder number, or something fire-fighting related, or related to their wife/kids (name on a rose, tatted baby footprint or portrait, etc).

    2nd, it is not a legitimate fear Re: Hep C, because all tattoo parlors are required to use new needles and sterilized equipment, so the risk is actually extremely low.

    3rd, you can fish slap people all you want, but I have a visible tattoo and I've been offered leadership positions (turned them down) and have been accepted into Midwifery School. I've already exceeded my expected potential. An ER nurse where I work is covered in tats and recently won employee of the month. He's often the charge nurse.

    4th, Your advice to lie about or hide my tattoos? Thanks but no thanks. And I plan on adding to my collection.
    Last edit by KellNY on Apr 21, '07
  8. by   Cherish
    Quote from KellNY
    Wow. 1st, I'd like to see the research proving that which I bolded--I call BS. Same with the city fire fighter faux "swim test"-every single nyc fire fighter I've ever known (all 16 or so of them) has had at least one tattoo-either the badge with the ladder number, or something fire-fighting related, or related to their wife/kids (name on a rose, tatted baby footprint or portrait, etc).

    2nd, it is not a legitimate fear Re: Hep C, because all tattoo parlors are required to use new needles and sterilized equipment, so the risk is actually extremely low.

    3rd, you can fish slap people all you want, but I have a visible tattoo and I've been offered leadership positions (turned them down) and have been accepted into Midwifery School. I've already exceeded my expected potential. An ER nurse where I work is covered in tats and recently won employee of the month. He's often the charge nurse.

    4th, Your advice to lie about or hide my tattoos? Thanks but no thanks. And I plan on adding to my collection.
    :yeahthat:
  9. by   classy gal
    Quote from KellNY
    Wow. 1st, I'd like to see the research proving that which I bolded--I call BS. Same with the city fire fighter faux "swim test"-every single nyc fire fighter I've ever known (all 16 or so of them) has had at least one tattoo-either the badge with the ladder number, or something fire-fighting related, or related to their wife/kids (name on a rose, tatted baby footprint or portrait, etc).

    2nd, it is not a legitimate fear Re: Hep C, because all tattoo parlors are required to use new needles and sterilized equipment, so the risk is actually extremely low.

    3rd, you can fish slap people all you want, but I have a visible tattoo and I've been offered leadership positions (turned them down) and have been accepted into Midwifery School. I've already exceeded my expected potential. An ER nurse where I work is covered in tats and recently won employee of the month. He's often the charge nurse.

    4th, Your advice to lie about or hide my tattoos? Thanks but no thanks. And I plan on adding to my collection.
    Ok lets try this, As I want to warn prospective nursing students against getting tattoos(expecialy on their hand/arms). Let me retort.

    1st. Perhaps NYC does allow tattoos, but many do not. Why make your self less valuable and limit your arena of employability just because you like 'body art'.

    2nd. Tell that to popular media star pamela anderson. She contracted HEP C from an reputable tattoo parlor in Hollywood. It is so prevalent that you can not even donate blood for 6 months after a tattoo. Not so extremely low as you suggest as there are known statistics against your argument.

    3rd. There are many professional positions in life in which a visible tattoo will precluded you from holding. Why limit yourself for the sake of 'body art'? Surely CNAs and janitorial services are riddled with tattoos. Why make like harder for yourself?

    You can live in your own world, believing that modern tattoos are the mark of a free spirit and good employee. But the fact is there are legit reasons for discriminating against tattoos. Even the courts back the tattoo discrimination position.
  10. by   classy gal
    Quote from classy gal

    For first responders, your employer can require you to list ALL scars or tattoos. It is a felony to lie. Often times for fire fighters they use a polygraph during the interview. In the extreme case of some city fire fighters they have a "swim test" where the point is not to test your swimming ability but to see if you have a disqualifying tattoo.
    If i know about 'tattoo swim tests' then it is more common that you would think. I have a nephew who was disqualified to be city fire fighter during a pre-interview. They asked with-out a polygraph if he had ever smoked marijuana. Knowing that in the real interview later they would use a polygraph, so he admitted that in high school and in college (he has a B.S.) to trying marijuana. They told him that he was permanently excluded from employment in their city.
    I would imagine that everyone wants their best chance to excel. Why would you limit yourself by doing something that could preclude you from lifetime employment?

    Please who ever reads this.....

    DON'T GET ANY VISIBLE TATTOOS. And that I mean no NECK / HAND / LOWER ARM TATTOOS. You WILL experience discrimination. And it is legal to do so.
  11. by   KellNY
    Quote from classy gal
    1st. Perhaps NYC does allow tattoos, but many do not. Why make your self less valuable and limit your arena of employability just because you like 'body art'.
    I have no idea about NYC as I've never worked there.
    Quote from classy gal
    2nd. Tell that to popular media star pamela anderson. She contracted HEP C from an reputable tattoo parlor in Hollywood. It is so prevalent that you can not even donate blood for 6 months after a tattoo. Not so extremely low as you suggest as there are known statistics against your argument.
    I'd rather tell it to the millions of others who don't contract hepatitis. And there really isn't much proof as to where Pamela Anderson contracted her Hep-could have been from unprotected sex or a number of other things. And not once did I say that it never happens--I'm not debating that it does (but rarely) so there haven't been any "known statistics" brought against my argument yet.
    Quote from classy gal
    3rd. There are many professional positions in life in which a visible tattoo will precluded you from holding. Why limit yourself for the sake of 'body art'? Surely CNAs and janitorial services are riddled with tattoos. Why make like harder for yourself?
    Yes...that's why they're janitors...because they have tattoos.

    Quote from classy gal
    You can live in your own world, believing that modern tattoos are the mark of a free spirit and good employee.
    The mark of a good employee? No. I never said that-that's just silly. My positive evaluations, job offers and satified patients are my mark. My tattoos don't prove or disprove my value as a registered nurse. They are just ink under my skin.
  12. by   KellNY
    If anyone is interested in FACTS instead of scare tactics, the most recent CDC report states
    About hepatitis: Of the 13,387 annual cases of hepatitis detailed in the most recent CDC report, 12 are associated with tattoo studios. By comparison, 43 cases -- or better than 300% more -- are associated with dental offices [2].
    This can be found on www.cdc.gov

    I think we can all agree that the CDC is a pretty reputable organization. 12 out of 13,387. What is that roughly.... 0.09%--a little less than that, actually? I'd say the risk is pretty low.
  13. by   MOOSEMAN
    As a prior mgr. If your not able to cover up your tattoo while at work. You won't be hired. It's not you who determines what is offensive, it's your co-workers and future pts.

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