Taking out the trash - page 8

Are any of you expected to take out the trash at work? I'm not talking about picking up after yourself in general, but taking the bag of trash to the soiled utility room. I got offended when a... Read More

  1. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    Every place i've worked at, the nurse or aide got rid of the "bulk", housekeeping cleaned afterwards.
  2. by   feb9822
    I see this discussion going much the way of other nursing issues. I have heard this one, as a matter of fact, for at least 15 years. If nurses would simply value themselves as much as they say they value their patients, this wouldn't even be an issue.
    A hospital is staffed by multiple disciplines, not only nurses. If others that are responsible for performing duties to keep the patients comfortable are not showing the same dedication to their job as you are to yours, there is a deeper problem present than who takes the garbage out of the room! These issues must be discussed with the department heads over those employees. Yes, nursing must be represented, as I have seen hospitals that have actually put taking trash out as a nursing responsiblity. I would think they would realize that our knowledge is what they are paying us for, and find someone who will take out the trash for less money. Those floors who do take out the trash appear to have more staff than they need, if they indeed have time to do mindless tasks as trash collection rather than patient assessment, patient support, or teaching an inservice. These are the things I was trained to do that no one else in the hospital can do. I am not "beneath" emptying the trash, but I refuse to be taken into the pitfall of "she's too good to do this", I'm just trained in a different expertise. Maybe if we would do less enabling as nurses and grew a spine, we'd have a stronger profession!!
  3. by   leslie :-D
    we are prone to certain personality traits, aren't we? so true.
  4. by   CEO
    Quote from Farkinott
    I think that my fellow colleagues working in the USA need to stick up for their rights! Nurses are skilled professionals, not menial workers! If you continue to "not mind" doing other people's jobs on a regular basis you will forever be entrenched in a subservient role to our higher paid medial colleagues! Get a grip! Do you see physios, ocuppatonal therapists, slcial workers etc. "not minding" to take out the rubbish as it is offending their delicate nostrils?! Some of you guys need to put yourselves at the top of the ladder, not skimming the dregs from the bottom!

    Farkinott, your comment ...."offending their delicate nostrils?! .." is a bit contradictory don't you think? You are slinging off at the sometimes high and mightly attitudes of some of the different professionals that we work with by referring to their 'delicate nostrils'. We are all aware of this type of behaviour - we see it every day in a stuck-up surgeon or allied healh professional, YET you're suggesting that as nurses we start acting in this way too! Quite frankly, you would be a pain in the ar#$ to work with. Where do you get off thinking that you are above other people. Nurses have suffered long and hard from having to work with other professionals who believe that we should fall into line with a master-servant relationship. I'm damned if I'm going to perpetuate that system so that I treat others as if they are subserviant to me. As far as I'm concerned it is a team effort. Housekeeping staff, food services personnel are professionals as well. If your definition of a 'professional' is someone with a degree then think again. I've worked with highly educated people with all sorts of degrees and some of them can't walk and chew gum at the same time.
  5. by   movealong
    If the trash needs to be emptied and nobody else ( housekeeping) is able, sure I'll empty the trash. More so if we did any kind of bedside procedure and filled the trash.

    It doesn't hurt to do it. If the housekeeping staff is busy, you just pitch in. They appreciate it too. So later, when you need a room and bed cleaned stat for a new admission, you'll get a better response from housekeeping if they feel you are one of the team and THEY feel they are part of the team and everyone works together.

    You ever read the studies that mention sometimes the people the patients talk to the most are the housekeeping staff? Because they send more time in the room? I've had them come out and fill me in on some info about a patient before.

    Anyway, trash might not be a priority, but if I've got time, yes I will empty trash. No probem. I wouldn't even think twice about it. If it needs doing, do it.
  6. by   Alnamvet
    If everyone simply did the job they were hired to do in the first place, this would be a non-issue...my license as an RN/FNP makes no mention of picking up the slack for housekeepers,cna's, LPN's, techs, md's, do's, PA's, RRT's, et al...I provide mid level care for patients as, with the understanding that ancillary staff have their roles, which I am to assume they are fulfilling. Nursing has had to fight an uphill battle for too long, for me to buy into this BS about picking up the trash for the patient's benefit...I do my job, and I do it well 'cause I don't have to, nor will I, wonder if the other "professions" are doing theirs. It is not my problem...my patients are my concern, not wondering if other departments/employees are short staffed, or if they are incompetent, or if they are lazy, whatever. Those are management issues, not mine.
  7. by   Farkinott
    I am sorry that you don't value yourself in the same way that I value myself nad my nursing colleagues. I you want to fight to empty the rubbish I will leave it up to you.

    undefined :uhoh21: :uhoh21:
    Quote from CEO
    Farkinott, your comment ...."offending their delicate nostrils?! .." is a bit contradictory don't you think? You are slinging off at the sometimes high and mightly attitudes of some of the different professionals that we work with by referring to their 'delicate nostrils'. We are all aware of this type of behaviour - we see it every day in a stuck-up surgeon or allied healh professional, YET you're suggesting that as nurses we start acting in this way too! Quite frankly, you would be a pain in the ar#$ to work with. Where do you get off thinking that you are above other people. Nurses have suffered long and hard from having to work with other professionals who believe that we should fall into line with a master-servant relationship. I'm damned if I'm going to perpetuate that system so that I treat others as if they are subserviant to me. As far as I'm concerned it is a team effort. Housekeeping staff, food services personnel are professionals as well. If your definition of a 'professional' is someone with a degree then think again. I've worked with highly educated people with all sorts of degrees and some of them can't walk and chew gum at the same time.
  8. by   orrnlori
    I personally think this thread needs an end. Values are subjective and personal. I don't think all this slamming around is effective concerning this topic. There are obviously two camps here. So some of us will take out the trash when needed and others of us find it a contemptable practice below our station in life, and what benefit does going on and on about it bring forth?
  9. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    Quote from Farkinott
    I am sorry that you don't value yourself in the same way that I value myself nad my nursing colleagues. I you want to fight to empty the rubbish I will leave it up to you.

    undefined :uhoh21: :uhoh21:


    Taking out the trash does not make anyone any less valuable. However, a superior attitude does not help any problems either.
  10. by   CEO
    Quote from Farkinott
    I am sorry that you don't value yourself in the same way that I value myself nad my nursing colleagues. I you want to fight to empty the rubbish I will leave it up to you.

    undefined :uhoh21: :uhoh21:
    Of course I value myself and my workmates. Don't be ridiculous now. And, stop taking yourself so seriously. Perhaps you're valuing yourself a bit 'too much'.

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