Survey: Should nurses from other countries be recruited to aid in the nursing shortag - page 7

This month's survey Question: Should nurses from other countries be recruited to aid in the nursing shortage? Please take a minute to take answer our survey and please feel free to reply to... Read More

  1. by   Sheri257
    Quote from mfdteacher
    I am well aware that not all nurses work in hospitals, but I'd bet that is where the majority of nursing positions are.
    According to the U.S. Health Department, about 60 percent of nursing jobs are in hospitals. Just FYI.

    Last edit by Sheri257 on Jun 3, '04
  2. by   suzanne4
    Quote from fergus51
    I have known several nurses who passed english tests. Unfortunately, that doesn't mean they can actually function in healthcare with their level of fluency.
    If you are talking about just the TOEFL exam, which is all that the US used to require to work in the US on a temporary work ppermit such as H1-B, that is very correct. TOEFL alone doesn't prove that you have fuctional English skills at all. I know of students that have passed that test and coan't speak a word of English.
    Now they are required to have the TSE (TEst of Spoken English) as well as the TWE (Test of Written English). The scores necessary to pass TSE are equivalent to those of a native speaker. But remember that these tests only look at "regular" English, not "medical" English. That is why I set up my program. My students actually do dictation of medical terms, such as "Call a Code"-"Please page anesthesia stat"-"Call Dr. Jones at his office now"- along with various others. They are quite aware of the cultural differences of working in the US, vs. their home country. They also learn about the American diet, as they will no longer be eating rice at every meal, and how to do patient teaching about same. They can actually tell you the differences between Atkins and South Beach diets.
  3. by   suzanne4
    Quote from cwernc
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    foreign nurses are not the issue, our lack of working nurses is. there are nurses brought over fronm the phillapines that are here for a year, all expenses paid, prior to them starting jobs. they are supported by the hospitals they will work for. why is no one acting on inactive nurses? why is no one looking at disabled nurses. i am disabled and work full time from a chair.
    there are no more temporary work permits for nurses. those that are here on them are not getting them renewed.
    Last edit by suzanne4 on Jun 12, '04
  4. by   suzanne4
    Quote from CCU NRS
    Really tho rerading & writing english are still very separate from a clear understandable voice
    There is also a speaking section that they must get a perfect score on. If thier pronunciation is poor, then they don't pass. This was not required in the past, only of nurses who were applying for a green card after they had been in the US for awhile. With the temporary work permits, it was never required, this is where you run into a problem.
  5. by   suzanne4
    Quote from lizz
    As always, thanks suzanne. I did not know that the new requirements hadn't gone into effect yet. That certainly explains all of these posts where people have been complaining about English proficiency.

    Hopefully, the new laws will help address that problem. Question: Do you know if the marriage exemption that you previously mentioned would also apply under these new laws?

    :spin:
    The new requirements stipulate that the nurse's English skills must be comparable to a native speaker. And the tests are quite difficult. There are actually quite a fewn Indian and Filipino nurses that have problems with the exams and they speak English. It is the same for Australia also.
  6. by   dkbhu49
    I am absolutely against hospitals spending massive am't of $ to recruit nurses from overseas when they won't spend a dime to recruit back ALL the American nurses that got fed up and left . Staffing according to acuity went out the window so now they staff according to NUMBERS! Consequently, they put nurses on call and leave those working so short staffed there's hardly a shift goes by that someone is not in tears from overwork and exhaustion! There are plenty of nurses around, all they want is decent working conditions where they can give good pt care and a decent salary. On the other hand, foreign nurses aren't quite as "mouthey" as American nurses. They're grateful to be here and will do most anything asked of them in order to remain. Mandatory overtime? No problem..I've seen some foreign nurses work 10-12 , 12hr shifts in a row!!!!! Hospital administrations love them, they do what they're told and never complain. What we need now is nurses who will stand up and fight for better working conditions, better pt care, better pay. We can't just lay down and take it anymore.
  7. by   Rep
    Quote from talaxandra
    With the number of ex-pat Fillipina nurses working in Australia and elsewhere, supply within your country must be diminishing. Do the Phillipine public know that there is a nursing drain from the Phillipines?
    Actually, there are lots of nurses here but they can not find work in the hospitals because there are no openings. I myself is a BSN-RN but I am not working as one.
  8. by   lifeisbeautiful
    Should nurses from other countries be recruited to aid in the nursing shortage?

    This is a really tough question and difficult to answer. First, if there are so many people getting laid off in other fields, why are they not being offered a chance with vocational rehab involving nursing? A free education! Wow! Or are they being offered the opportunity, but see how difficult this field can be and don't want to chance it. I just read an article that stated that 2 out of 10 RNs plan to leave the field this year! That is a very high turn-over. In the same report, 40% of nurses reported job dissatisfaction. In the magazine Working Nurse, they completed a 3-part series on 'Demotivation in the Nursing Profession'. They then stated that they were saddened that the article hit such a nerve with the RN's of the community. This is the problem with nursing. Many people try to sugar-coat this career, then act surprised when people are unhappy. I do not think bringing in foreign workers is the answer. As a white woman, I am a minority at the hospital where I work. I work with many foreign nurses that are sooo thankful to be in this county that they skip breaks, lunches and stay late (often without pay which is illegal). So when I stand up for my rights that I am entitled to, I look like an ungrateful *****. Their English is poor, so guess who gets stuck working with the MDs that are difficult? ME!! The doctors' complain to the hospital that the language barrier is dangerous, but the hospital doesn't care. I love working with many of the Registery and Travel Nurses, but it is unfair that we are doing the same job (actually, as staff, we do a lot more work), but they get paid $20-$30 more an hour!! I feel it creates an underlying resentment for the staff nurses. Hospitals need to treat the staff that is loyal, first and focus on retention!! I know many nurses that move from hospital to hospital every year or two just for the great bonuses! Oh, and if you cannot find a job as a RN, come to Southern California...there are tons of openings
  9. by   Sundowner
    My experience with foriegn nurses:
    I work for a corp. that about two years ago decided to bring over about 20 nurses from two different countries. They shacked them up and paid their rent for a year....paid them more than what they pay the regular staff..bent over backwards to keep their whiny butts happy.....not ONE of them were able to pass the PA state boards...so guess what.....none of them can afford their rent anymore. Their spouses and children that they brought with them (we paid for that too) speak next to no english and cant find a job .....theses nurses cant even pass the CNA tests, so they have taken huge pay cuts to go and work in the kitchens with their non english speaking spouses.

    My facility is back to all english speaking, knowledgable, patient friendly,nurses..there is no more jibberish being spoken in the hallways, but sadly I fear that these recruits we spent so much money on are going to end up needing our goverments assistance to stay afloat over here.

    I am not for recruitment by any means. My experience with foriegn nurses has been nothing but bad, as has my patients experiences with them.
  10. by   mamabear
    Quote from grizfan
    Guys, Guys, Guys! people from different countries do not think like we think. It may be a 'cultural crevase' too wide to work in. Experience tells me that the efforts should be made on two groups; new nurses and old nurses. Treat new with care (don't tell a newly dx cancer patient he is going to die). Treat old like they are special (they want to know from you that they are or they will leave). Everyone wants to stay on the job. A pat on the back by those they work with goes a long way. grizfan
    My sentiments exactly! Are we all too P.C. to discuss cultural differences (by foreign, I mean non-North American)?
  11. by   suzanne4
    Quote from Sundowner
    My experience with foriegn nurses:
    I work for a corp. that about two years ago decided to bring over about 20 nurses from two different countries. They shacked them up and paid their rent for a year....paid them more than what they pay the regular staff..bent over backwards to keep their whiny butts happy.....not ONE of them were able to pass the PA state boards...so guess what.....none of them can afford their rent anymore. Their spouses and children that they brought with them (we paid for that too) speak next to no english and cant find a job .....theses nurses cant even pass the CNA tests, so they have taken huge pay cuts to go and work in the kitchens with their non english speaking spouses.

    My facility is back to all english speaking, knowledgable, patient friendly,nurses..there is no more jibberish being spoken in the hallways, but sadly I fear that these recruits we spent so much money on are going to end up needing our goverments assistance to stay afloat over here.

    I am not for recruitment by any means. My experience with foriegn nurses has been nothing but bad, as has my patients experiences with them.
    This is why I have never liked or approved of the temporary work permits.
    Now to work in the US, the nurse must pass either CGFNS or NCLEX, as well as the series of English exams before being given a visa to work in the US as a permanent resident. Apparently your company was more concerned with the number of bodies that they could get and not doing things properly.
    Did they ever even fly over and interview these nurses in person, or were they just looking at paperwork. English skills must be similar to those of a native English speaker. And sorry to say, but my students have better writing skills from many of the posts that I see here.
    Last edit by suzanne4 on Jun 12, '04
  12. by   fergus51
    Quote from mamabear
    My sentiments exactly! Are we all too P.C. to discuss cultural differences (by foreign, I mean non-North American)?
    I don't think it's a matter of being PC or not. I just think that foreign born nurses are often an asset too, not just a drain. We have a lot of foreign born patients. Seems to me that having some foreign born nurses who think differently could be helpful sometimes.
  13. by   missmercy
    We have recently hired some nurses from India -- the company that hired them "let" my facility buy out their contract. They are highly intelligent women! Passed the grueling English exams and the NCLEX. Ther English is correct -- however, the accents are so strong that it is extremely difficult to understand them!! While they have anaverage of 12 years of "nursing" in India, they are rather unfamiliar with our acceptable medical practices: sterile fields and techniques, high tech apparatus etc. They have reported that where they worked in India, only doctors did assessments. The nurse's job was to pass meds(fo 30-50 pts), while pt's families did baths, dressing changes, feeding etc. We bought out the contract after the company assured us that these were skilled nurses ( 1 short interview w/ an HR person) -- now it is my job to assist in their orientation process. I think they are great gals!! They REALLY want to have things work out here -- "because it's America" -- but I have some real concerns about how well they will be able to communicate with co-workers, physicians ( that will probably not be too bad since a HUGE portion of our Dr.s are -- Indian), and most of all patients. They will primarily be working with older folks -- HOH, confused, post ops. I'ld love to say that I am sure they willl do fantastically, but I am not sure at this point. We are investing 5 weeks into their orientation, prior to a month w/ a preceptor on their unit -- days, then a couple of weeks w/ a preceptor on their unit- nights, so there is some serious pressure to make sure they do well......... hope so! they are SO thrilled to be here and really want to do well..... and all the cultural things too -----

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