Survey: Should nurses from other countries be recruited to aid in the nursing shortag - page 10

This month's survey Question: Should nurses from other countries be recruited to aid in the nursing shortage? Please take a minute to take answer our survey and please feel free to reply to... Read More

  1. by   jtfreel
    The nursing shortage is a global issue. If countries recruit from abroad, does that help with the global shortage? Does this practice address the factors fueling this issue? Does it make nursing education as viable a career option as hospital nursing? Does it attract students to enter nursing? None of the above: it says the country with the most money can buy what it needs even at the expense of others.
  2. by   mother/babyRN
    I have no problem with people(nurses) from other places working here if they would like, as long as they are qualified..Much as I would expect other nations to feel about me should I choose to go abroad..However, that said, as so many others have most likely said, I do NOT think they should be specifically recruited for such things because it is an arrogant slap in the face of skilled and willing nurses already here who are not but should be treated financially, emotionally and professionally much much better. Anyone can fill a slot but only a certain few can fill it well and appropriately. The issue of recruiting from foreign countries is a problem because if that is the "answer" to the nursing shortage, it doesn't behoove American nurses already here being treated badly at the very least and wrongly most of the time, to get into the field when it is being usurped because people from other countries may be willing and grateful to accept paltry (for the skills and needs required) fianancial and professional circumstances.
    Been there done that during the last shortage. Didn't work then and won't work now...
  3. by   Stellamj99
    Quote from brian
    This month's survey Question:

    Should nurses from other countries be recruited to aid in the nursing shortage?

    Please take a minute to take answer our survey and please feel free to reply to this topic to post any comments that you may have on the topic.
    No, I do not think that we should be recruiting nurses from other countries. It is bad enough that they are moving so many computer jobs, factories and other businesses out of the country forcing many men and women to go jobless. There is no reason to put our nurses out of work or try to make them work for less after all they have been through. It is very unfair what is happening to our country.
  4. by   Hellllllo Nurse
    Quote from CCU NRS
    Could you split the hair a little more puhlease! That is like saying we don't have a gas shortage we have an oil shortage! Yes we do have a nursing shortage, even though there are more than one hundred thousand licensed nurses that are not currently working that creates a nursing shortage, if they are not working as nurses.

    I don't understand why anyone wants to argue the issue of a shortage. If there are not enough nurses working there is a shortage. Many of the nurses that continue to have a license will never return for reasons such as having married a Doctor, or someone else with enough money to support them, it's like a hairdresser, even though you have no intention of returning to work it is prudent to keep your license updated and valid because one never knows what might happen.

    I doubt that very many nurses have left nursing because they married a doctor! Probably one half of one percent.
    I am married to a PhD prepared research scientist. I am still hanging in there, trying to make nursing work for me. However, it gets harder every day.
    Mgmt sends nurses home and cuts their hours at every nursing job I've ever had. Short staffing, not a nursing shortage, is the reality.

    When will people wake up and realize there is no freakin' nursing shortage!
    The real shortage is in tolerable working conditions for nurses.

    I could not disagree more with your opinions.
    Last edit by Hellllllo Nurse on Jun 20, '04
  5. by   Sheri257
    Quote from Hellllllo Nurse
    When will people wake up and realize there is no freakin' nursing shortage! The real shortage is in tolerable working conditions for nurses.
    As I've stated before, I agree that there may not be a "real" shortage now, but there will probably be a "real" shortage in the future.

    The pool of non-working licensed RNs won't come close to filling the projected vacancies in the next 16 years, even if working conditions improved, and even if you assume all of them could return to work.

    Last edit by Sheri257 on Jun 21, '04
  6. by   CHATSDALE
    SWHYTE sounds like a person who goes into another person's house and c/o the decor and food etc.....(s)he should feel that the people she works with are professional...by the way the one of the worse nurses i ever worked with came to us as a traveling nurse...she wasn't bad because she was canadian she was just one of those people whom you can never figure out who she got through school with so little practical knowledge and a poor work ethic
  7. by   Nurselinks
    Quote from brian
    This month's survey Question:

    Should nurses from other countries be recruited to aid in the nursing shortage?

    Please take a minute to take answer our survey and please feel free to reply to this topic to post any comments that you may have on the topic.
    I think more efforts should be made to use our already available pool of nurses. Making it more accessible for LPN to get their RN training without jumping through whoops. I would much rather have a persons care for me that have an excellent command of the English language. I do not think that a patient should be burden with the problem of trying to understand what their caregiver is trying to communicate. I am a strong advocate of having available translations services 24 hours 7 days a week to ensure that all patient get equal care and understand what is required of them as patients.

    I have be in situations where the patient was almost abused because there were no one present to translate, so the patient was over sedated and I feel that the basic needs of the patient had not been met.
    Last edit by Nurselinks on Jun 21, '04
  8. by   suzanne4
    Quote from Nurselinks
    I think more efforts should be made to use our already available pool of nurses. Making it more accessible for LPN to get their RN training without jumping through whoops. I would much rather have a persons care for me that have an excellent command of the English language. I do not think that a patient should be burden with the problem of trying to understand what their caregiver is trying to communicate. I am a strong advocate of having available translations services 24 hours 7 days a week to ensure that all patient get equal care and understand what is required of them as patients.

    I have be in situations where the patient was almost abused because there were no one present to translate, so the patient was over sedated and I feel that the basic needs of the patient had not been met.
    Fitst there are 24 hour translation services available. It is thru ATT. It is impossible to have some-one in house to translate for all languages. If the hospital uses a service then they have certified translators available, quite helpful when you are not even asure od what the language is.

    Foreign nurses need to have English skills now to be equal to those of a native speaker. They are probably better than quite a few Americans. If there pronunciation is wrong, they do not pass. Those nurses that are in the US on temporary work permits are not having them renewed.

    Not sure where you work.............
    And would a patient be over-sedated because someone couldn't understanad the language??? Poor excuse. Doesn't fly with me.
  9. by   totallytheresa
    Well I thought this to be funny. My bf came over just the other night, seems someone he has sold several cars to at the dealership he works in is an Indian businessman. This man evidently is planning on bringing over about 10,000 nurses from India, where they make hardly any money, and having them live and work here, due to our "nursing shortage" as well as the one expected once baby boomers get older. This man expects to make huge amounts of money off of this, and the big plan is to have them send money home to help their families, his way of "giving back". Ha. And he wants my bf to head up his operation, acclimate these nurses to life in the states, get apts, cell phones, cars, etc... and that he will make my bf a very wealthy man. Well I told him that I thought the whole thing sounded pretty hokey- for one thing. For another- lets make nursing school affordable to us, right here. I am able to put myself through school, but I bet there are many people out there who cannot afford this opportunity.
  10. by   BRAGGY
    Hello there! I am a RN from Australia, as well I have worked in England and I can tell you this, that it is the same old story! "Nursing shortages" And like America, every other industralised country does the same, when it comes to nursing shortages, recruit, any nurse, from anywhere! Personally I like foreign nurses, I have been one myself! As far as supply and demand cycle goes, unlike other industries, I have found to some degree the effect on wage premiums in nursing has been negligable. What about the nurses out there, do you think foreign nurses working in your market place has a real effect on wage premiums in your area?

    Braggy from down under.

    Quote from odatrn
    mfdteacher wrote:

    We do not need foreign nurses, we need to address the problems imposed by the system currently in place. As long as the dollar is more important than the patient, we'll never go back to the hospital.

    You said it best! I don't mind being mindful of the budget crisis in health care, but let the doctors shoulder some of the responsibility in the situation. As for foreign nurses? We are a town of 36,000 and have a community college close by that has ADN and an LPN programs. It is the only thing that keeps our shortage at bay.
  11. by   suzanne4
    Quote from totallytheresa
    Well I thought this to be funny. My bf came over just the other night, seems someone he has sold several cars to at the dealership he works in is an Indian businessman. This man evidently is planning on bringing over about 10,000 nurses from India, where they make hardly any money, and having them live and work here, due to our "nursing shortage" as well as the one expected once baby boomers get older. This man expects to make huge amounts of money off of this, and the big plan is to have them send money home to help their families, his way of "giving back". Ha. And he wants my bf to head up his operation, acclimate these nurses to life in the states, get apts, cell phones, cars, etc... and that he will make my bf a very wealthy man. Well I told him that I thought the whole thing sounded pretty hokey- for one thing. For another- lets make nursing school affordable to us, right here. I am able to put myself through school, but I bet there are many people out there who cannot afford this opportunity.
    He can plan on bringing over as many nurses as he wants, but they have to get a green card first, and with that they have to pass the speaking part of the IELTS or the TSE. And most of them don't, especially coming from India.

    Your boyfriend may be wating quite a long time. Average time to get a green card is about two years for many states.
  12. by   totallytheresa
    Thank you very much- exactly what I told my bf- that they can't just show up here and begin practicing! Even if I moved to another state here, I would have to become certified in their state!



    Quote from suzanne4
    He can plan on bringing over as many nurses as he wants, but they have to get a green card first, and with that they have to pass the speaking part of the IELTS or the TSE. And most of them don't, especially coming from India.

    Your boyfriend may be wating quite a long time. Average time to get a green card is about two years for many states.
  13. by   chris_at_lucas_RN
    As bad as things may seem in the US, it is nothing compared to the situation in the countries from which nurses are recruited, in many cases. The recruiters tend to be money-grubbers who mislead these nurses into believing they will make big money, but they do not give them a very good idea of the cost of living.

    Also, we have enough nurses, we just don't have enough nurses working. They leave the profession for lots of reasons, but a lot of times it is due to working conditions. If foreign nurses are brought in to fill the gap, the problems will never be resolved. In effect, these nurses are willing (apparently) to put up with the problems, which we often equate to unsafe patient situations, in order to live in the US and/or make more money.

    Let's face it, if they made this much money, parity considered, in their own countries, they would probably stay there.

    Bottom line: every time we bring a foreign nurse into the US to fill the gap here, many patients in their home countries go without care. EVERY SINGLE TIME.

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