such bureaucracy... (kind of a rant)

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    I externed at a local hospital before taking my boards this summer and they called me in for an interview and pretty much hired me before I even passed my boards. I passed, brought in my license and registration, gave them my transcript, referral letters, etc. all that good stuff. They tell me they will reach out to me when they're ready for me to come in for the physical and background check. Meanwhile, I technically don't have an offer letter yet so I'm not banking on anything, and I'm applying to other facilities. 3 weeks later, I call to check on my status. Yesterday I get a call back asking me to come in today to move forward.

    I had an appointment for 9am, showed up at 8:45am, didn't leave the freaking hospital until nearly 3pm!!

    I had to fill out so many HR packets my head was spinning, along with an "application" packet that looked like it was from 1982. After that, I went to OHS for the physical - more paperwork, even though I had printed out and brought a full medication list and medical history, I had to write everything on their forms over and over. I give blood and urine and am given my cheap little medical card with my name, address and file number on it, only they misspelled my street name so I had to wait 15mins for a new one.

    Then I am back in HR filling out another 7+ forms/questionnaires for my background check. Oh, how convenient, I have to reimburse the facility $90+ for the background check, AND I need to submit a money order for $25 for a child and family services check. OH, and I have to get three pages notarized.

    That's okay, I'm told, there are 5 notaries in various locations in the hospital - and so I'm given a list of office locations. 45mins later and each one is crossed off the list - nobody is in today, or they're out to lunch, so I pay the $6 to have them notarized at the pharmacy across the street, after running around and standing in line at the post office for 20mins for a money order.

    Then I'm fingerprinted which was interesting... my passport and social security card is taken to be copied... I fill out and sign one last form and just as I'm leaving I see my soon to be department ADN in the hallway! She's excited to see me and asks when I start orientation.

    "Well, they said they'll try to get everything back next week and hopefully I can begin orientation on 10/28"

    "Oh that'll never happen," she says, "they are notoriously slow. I'll keep my fingers crossed for you but you probably won't start until December since we don't do orientation in November."

    I seriously feel like screaming right now. Why are these facilities so far behind in technology? Why don't the different departments communicate with each other? Why such a bureaucratic system that's so inefficient? I'm so frustrated!

    I considered myself so lucky to get a job right out of school, in the Emergency Department no less! But right now I just want to go back to corporate where we get an offer letter a couple of days after the interview, and we start immediately after peeing in a cup.

    //end rant (sorry)

    so is this common? to be interviewed but not start orientation until 4 months later?
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  3. 26 Comments so far...

  4. 0
    It was for me. Process was from September-February, I started in February.
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    Really? I have never seen that kind of workout for a job. You have to reimburse them for background checks? That would make me think hard about them. It sounds petty and cheapo. Times must be a changing and I am on the last train.
    IowaKaren, KelRN215, Marisette, and 6 others like this.
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    thanks LadyFree28, nice to know I'm not alone in this situation!

    Ruas61, this is EXACTLY what I was thinking too!... it's a city hospital so they're not rolling in it or anything but I have NEVER asked to pay for my own background check before! And to go get a money order and to get pages notarized? I just thought that was so strange but this is my first job in healthcare, I figured maybe I just don't know the norm.

    I was having my doubts about this hospital, but I figure I'm pretty lucky to be offered a position as a new ASN grad in the ED of all places... so beggars can't be choosers... I'd rather work in the ED of a city hospital in a nasty neighborhood (Brooklyn, NYC) than work in a LTC facility or posh private hospital on the upper east side in Med/Surg (no disrespect for those people who do, just not my thing right now).
  7. 0
    Mine was nothing like that. Sure I had a bunch of forms to fill out and had to have a health eval and drug screen, but I didn't have to pay for the background check or get anything notarized.
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    While I'm not defending the hospital particularly, one thing to keep in mind is that healthcare employers have all kinds of regulations and laws regarding employment, including documentation, that corporate employers don't.

    It's also pretty common for hospitals to have set schedules for nursing orientation, that happens at particularly times each month, every other month, every three months (depending on the size of the hospital and how much employing they do), so it's not unusual to have to wait until the next scheduled orientation to be able to start working.

    Except for being asked to pay for the background checks, I'd say the description of the process sounds not all that unusual based on my experience over the years.
    poppycat, SoldierNurse22, and Altra like this.
  9. 2
    I have NEVER heard of having to pay for your own background check... and I'm older than dirt. Is this going to catch on with everyone else as they take advantage of the 'sellers market' with hordes of people clamoring for jobs??? <cringing>

    As for the rest of the process - <sigh>. There are an enormous number of FEDERAL mandates associated with the hiring & employment process in healthcare, so that makes up a large portion of the paperwork burden. Luckily, most large organizations have moved into the modern age and are able to streamline by using electronic systems.
    IowaKaren and Esme12 like this.
  10. 5
    At least you have a job...oh and if you think that is bad never go into government work...
    beshacohen, chare, BrooklynRN11201, and 2 others like this.
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    Sometimes nurses can start orienting on the unit and then get into the orientation class when it starts....that is BS that they don't tell you when your start date is, especially if it is 3-4 months away.

    As for the antiquated "paper system" that you describe, I hope they aren't using such in the ED. If they don't have an updated computer system - and/or are using paper charting - it is scarey and you are being set up for all kinds of errors. I can't believe there are still facilities out there using paper mars/charting but there are.
  12. 0
    Quote from hope3456
    Sometimes nurses can start orienting on the unit and then get into the orientation class when it starts....that is BS that they don't tell you when your start date is, especially if it is 3-4 months away.

    As for the antiquated "paper system" that you describe, I hope they aren't using such in the ED. If they don't have an updated computer system - and/or are using paper charting - it is scarey and you are being set up for all kinds of errors. I can't believe there are still facilities out there using paper mars/charting but there are.
    Thank you!! This is a great idea, I think I'll email the ADN and ask if it's possible to start unit orientation if I can't start regular orientation until December. It's a long shot but worth the attempt I suppose.

    As for the ED and rest of the hospital, nope, no paper charting. I can't believe there are facilities doing that still either! We use Quadramed EMR which is barely better than paper but I think they're upgrading soon. I believe the floors still paper document the I&O flow sheets but I'm pretty sure it's documented electronically at the end of the shift (from what I remember from my clinicals).


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