Stool transplant??? - page 3

We had a rep from our ID department come to a unit staff meeting to talk about infection control and she told us about a patient on another unit who was treated with antibiotics for C Diff for months... Read More

  1. by   Nurse Ratched
    Quote from TraumaQueen
    It's absolutely disgusting, and I think everyone was green and about to vomit afterward....
    And the REALLY impressive part is, how gross does something have to be to gross out a nurse?!? :chuckle
  2. by   CoffeeRTC
    This is gross, but think about the chronic c-dif pt... How horrible for them.. we have a pt who's been on Flagy and Vanco, taken acidophilus, yeast supplements and we even tried macaroons. Every now and then it clears up for a while.. but we all know how bad things can get for a LTC resident. I've looked in to this before and found tons of support groups on line and in person groups for people with c diff. I guess people will try anything as a last resort. Again this is really gross and I would hurl if I had to help out in this procedure.
  3. by   nurseygrrl
    Quote from TraumaQueen
    I found this article

    http://www-east.elsevier.com/ajg/iss...ajg3277edi.htm

    And, the infectious disease doctor was the one who ordered it.
    I printed this and am giving it to my ID nurse tomorrow! LMAO!
  4. by   justjenny
    Quote from Sadie04
    We had a rep from our ID department come to a unit staff meeting to talk about infection control and she told us about a patient on another unit who was treated with antibiotics for C Diff for months unsucessfully. Finally they tried a "stool transplant," where a family member 'donated' a stool sample to transplant into the C Diff patient's lower GI tract to help restore the normal flora. Can you imagine? I never heard of such a thing
    Even though it sounds gross... we learned about this in Microbiology.

    It should be a spouse that donates - someone living in the home. The explanation was: under specific circumstances where the patients normal flora is destroyed, they may have other health problems/concerns, and have chronic symptoms not controlled by normal measures (Ie: severe, chronic diarrhea, etc.)
    Our normal flora helps us in so many ways.... the fastest way to repopulate is the "transplant" with the thought that a spouse (for example) would have the same/very similar flora due to the "intimate" nature of the relationship.

    I guess this could only be used in certain instances, because if someones flora is "different" slightly than yours, I could see where that would worsen the problem.

    HTH
    Jenny
    ADN Grad Dec. 2005
  5. by   jnette
    hmmmm...you can sell your plasma, right? Something like thirty $$ a whack.

    see where I'm going with this?

    reminds me of a park overseas in the early seventies ... all the hashish heads hung out there... hash used to be called "shyt"... take a leisurely stroll through said park on a lovely summer afternoon, and it never failed... sooner or later someone would approach you with "Hey, man ! Wanna buy some SH*T?"

    Sooooooooo... wonder how much we could get for selling doo doo?

    'uhh... how'd you amass YOUR riches...?"
  6. by   eagleriver


    Quote from Sadie04
    We had a rep from our ID department come to a unit staff meeting to talk about infection control and she told us about a patient on another unit who was treated with antibiotics for C Diff for months unsucessfully. Finally they tried a "stool transplant," where a family member 'donated' a stool sample to transplant into the C Diff patient's lower GI tract to help restore the normal flora. Can you imagine? I never heard of such a thing
  7. by   nurseygrrl
    Quote from jnette
    hmmmm...you can sell your plasma, right? Something like thirty $$ a whack.

    see where I'm going with this?

    reminds me of a park overseas in the early seventies ... all the hashish heads hung out there... hash used to be called "shyt"... take a leisurely stroll through said park on a lovely summer afternoon, and it never failed... sooner or later someone would approach you with "Hey, man ! Wanna buy some SH*T?"

    Sooooooooo... wonder how much we could get for selling doo doo?

    'uhh... how'd you amass YOUR riches...?"


    ...and eagleriver~ Why a relative? Would you want any old strangers poop in your colon? :chuckle

    Seriously, I read an article and it said that it should be a relative, preferably a spouse because the intimate nature of the relationship and tendency to eat the same foods, drink the same water...etc. causes your intestinal flora to be similar. So, I guess my hubby's good for something then huh? :chuckle
  8. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    Gives new meaning to the phrase "giving them ****"
  9. by   GI Issue Nurse
    Actually makes a lot of sense and the thought does NOT gross me out, but there is the little fact that I manage an GI Endo lab!! ( LOL, LOL:roll )

    Not something most of us feel comfortable thinking about doing but if the patient gets better then it would be worth it.
  10. by   imenid37
    UGGGGGGGHHHHHHH!!! That's quite revolting! GRRRRROSSS!!!
    Last edit by imenid37 on Mar 4, '04
  11. by   nurseunderwater
    eeeeeeeeeeeeeeewwwwwwwwwwwwwwww. ethical smethical, it's just not a nice thing to contemplate :uhoh21:
  12. by   jasmine4494
    Quote from eagleriver
    From the review of the journal article cited:

    Selection of the donor is of crucial importance to avoid infecting the recipient with a separate disease. The donor should be tested at least for HIV, hepatitis A, B, and C, cytomegalovirus, and Epstein-Barr virus, with stool negative for any detectable parasites or bacterial pathogens. In our experience, choosing the patient's partner offers a theoretical advantage that any transmissible disease would have been transmitted and emerged by now.
  13. by   kimmicoobug
    My husband said he would gladly give me his sh*t if it meant I could get better. Though when I told him I would do the same for him, he got a lil green.

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